5

1) You first create a rectangle of your choice color and then spread it all over the screen and then 2) Then select that rectangle and click on Fill option and then 3) And then from the drop-down at the upper left written Solid select it and change it to Linear for Linear Gradient and Radial for Radial Gradient and others according to your choice 4) And ...


4

I think it's less complicated than you think. Just make some gradient. Here I've made a quick copy of the gradient used in your example. Then use that same gradient for a bunch of fills and/or brush strokes. Maybe use Blend Tool to make some of those repeated patterns. Maybe rotate the gradient in some of the shapes like in the example. This was made ...


4

What makes it look like it could be made of rubber? I tried blur like others have already done. But I happened to have some rubber membrane buttons available in front of me and they didn't look blurry. They were sharp but rounded. They also had some highlights, shadows and also a very fine texture which didn't totally disintegrate glosses at the edges. If ...


3

This is only a partial answer. It's about the surfaces on the grey background. Assuming you do not expect anything which is accompanied by an exact math formula those surfaces or at least something resembling can be produced in Illustrator. An example: Draw a rectangle. Make a copy of it: In the left one of the copies is filled with a colorful gradient. In ...


3

Those are not "adjustment layers". Those are Gradient Fill Layers. Layer > New Fill Layer > Gradient Double click the layer thumbnail and you can adjust the gradient.


3

Redrawing manually is probably the best way. Sometimes the best results require a little drudgery. There's no real need to use the Pen Tool for this if that's what scares you. The Curvature tool is nice for making almost perfect curves without too much effort. It could be constructed as follows: On top of the raster image, draw simple curves made with the ...


3

You have the stroke highlighted in the Gradient Panel. The Gradient Annotator does not work or appear for gradients on strokes. The annotator will only appear for fills.


3

There's nothing automatic as far as I know. Perhaps an extension could be written for it. Anyway, you could align the stops of a gradient using snapping to paths which have been distributed using Align & Distribute. For example


3

You can use Gradient overlay. Make sure all your lines are grouped or they are part of one layer. Then right click (or from fx button) over your layer or group (your artwork), select Blending Options and use desired gradient overlay, like this: Alternatively, you can create a new gradient layer and use clipping mask. If you want gradient over your ...


3

I don't think Illustrator is the best tool for this, so I'll show a solution for Photoshop. Don't know if you're interested in that. Let's start with some slightly blurred image. First use Filter > Pixelate > Mosaic to pixelate the image. Here I used these settings: Then use Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask to apply those shadows to the pixels. ...


3

In order to avoid the stripes, I suggest the following: Create the map in really high resolution 4000x4000 or even more. Apply a little gausian blur when it's done to smooth it more. In brush settings adjust spacing to minimum. Tip: You can try the Liquify filter to create these flares, although it's not exactly the desired result but it might be useful. ...


2

Here's one method. Draw the lines over the raster logo, making sure to overlap some of the lines Use the Shape Builder tool to make solid pieces you can fill, and to delete the pieces and lines that aren't required. Fill the separate pieces with gradients as required Finally add a white stroke with "Width Profile 1" along the three bottom segments, and ...


2

You can start with a rectangular image that you fill with a repeated linear gradient (using the repetition option of the blend tool of course, set to Sawtooth): And then apply Filters>Distorts>Polar coordinates with To polar ticked:


2

You could use three overlapping circles, one on top filled with same colour as the background, one filled with a lighter orange under that under that, and and one filled with a darker orange/brown under that. Select all circles and apply a Gaussian Blur effect. This method will also create a very slightly lighter edge all around the button enhancing the ...


2

Color theory is not a hard science, its more traditional level stuff. Mixed with older hard science studies. Now color science, which is a cognitive science subfield, is a hard science, but also really really complicated. . There are some standard scientific scales. Like for example on better figures org. Color science gives you methods to calculate color ...


2

In Inkscape 1.0, when you select the gradient (as in your 1st picture), then you can check the edit icon below (or alternatively, use the gradient editing tool by pressing G). A guide with 2 nodes appears on your figure (in the canvas). You can select each node and change its colour, or you can double click in between and add more nodes.


2

There are a couple things to consider when going with a gradient in a logo. But first, you should almost always use PMS numbers when designing a logo, preferably from the "Coated" palette for color accuracy. Even though there are multiple methods of reproducing the logo in hundreds of different formats, PMS is an internationally accepted standard ...


2

You don't really need to use Pantone colors, as most logos are done in CMYK and/or RGB. Even those logos that do actually use Pantone colors, they also come in CMYK-only and RGB-only versions, because those designers know Pantone can be tricky to work with and generally more expensive to print. However, if you print digitally, which is the more common form ...


2

This is a way to get this in Illustrator. I am not sure if this will work for you without knowing what your use is. Create Rectangle at artboard size with linear black to white fill and no stroke. Make Ellipse with white fill and no stroke. Select both rectangle and ellipse. In Transparency Panel (Window>Transparency) click the "Make Mask" ...


2

GIFs do not allow for smooth 8-bit transparency. It is simply a limitation of the format itself. There's nothing you can do to alter or overcome that limitation. GIF transparency is 1-bit - meaning it's either on or off, nothing in between. The best you can do in a GIF is to dither the transparency which will create a sort of stipple or dot pattern within ...


2

One more: There's black text on white background in the bottom. Above the text there's a group. (see NOTE1) The group contains a grey rectangle and blurred white ellipses or circles. The rectangle and the blurred shapes have blending mode = Normal, but the group has blending mode=Multiply. There's still black text and totally free form gradient light. The ...


2

Grey rectangle, black type. Gradients are applied as additional fills for the rectangle (under the type)... white 100% opacity to white 0% opacity gradient fills... This keeps type visible and readable while highlighting specific areas... No blending modes necessary, but you could use blending modes if you want. Just move the box above the type and set it's ...


2

I would use an Opacity Mask... Copy the text (It doesn't matter if the text is "live text" or "outlines". The following steps are all the same.) Select the the gradient shape Click the Make Mask button on the Transparency Panel (Window > Transparency) Click the mask thumbnail on the Transparency Panel to edit the mask Choose Edit > ...


2

Manually.... Click a gradient Color Stop, drag from the Color Panel to the Swatch Panel Kind of, sort of, more automated... Select an object with the gradient fill Choose Edit > Edit Colors > Recolor Artwork Expand the Dialog Window if it isn't already expanded. Click the little Color Group icon in the upper right corner - it looks like a folder Click ...


2

I don't think this is created from a gradient. As mentioned in comments it seems to just be a simple geometric pattern consisting of a lot of circles on top of some rectangles. You could probably use all sorts of transform magic to make it easier, but here I just want to show you how to draw the pattern with the mouse and keyboard using Ellipse Tool, ...


1

Here's a possible work around Make sure the PSD is saved before you proceed Right click the groups with layer effects, and do Merge Group Do the export Close the document without saving


1

Some of these you could 'fake' in Illustrator, but for most of them, some kind of 3D software is required. You can see the polygons (squares that make up the mesh) on some of those 3D shapes, which indicates they were made in 3D software. All of these can be made in Blender, which is free.


1

Use the Gradient Tool in GIMP. You'll need to set the Shape to one of the two Conical options in the tool options, and choose a colourful gradient, or create your own gradient. Example using the Conical (sym) setting. Example using the Conical (asym) setting and a custom gradient I made to match the one in your example EDIT If you want the gradient, here's ...


1

You can select multiple objects using the Select by Nodes tool N by holding down Shift as you click, to select each object. Then, while holding down Shift as you click, you can select multiple handles. Then click and drag and move them as one. Example Another possible solution, if all the objects are the same shape, is to create Clones, and edit the ...


1

There is. For some inexplicable reason it is hidden inside the 'Dynamics' options, whose help page is here. One of the preset dynamics you can select is 'Color From Gradient', and it does exactly what the 2.2 dialog describes with a slightly different UI.


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