13

Ambiguity or unreadability is not always a bad thing in a logo. Being too literal can, at times, cause a design to suffer. It all inevitably comes down to how a mark is going to be used. An unreadable logo by itself can be detrimental to a startup or a company without a decent marketing budget. If the goal is to just throw the mark on items or good and have ...


6

You're going to have to Outline the text and then use the Direct Select tool on the parts you want rounded. I'm also not sure how far back this feature exists but in Adobe Illustrator CC there's a Corner Radius function. Using the Direct Selection along with Corner Radius on specific points you can achieve the result you're after as so: If you're using an ...


6

The client is never "ignorant". They are the client. They are paying the invoices, their opinion always matters. How you combat feedback you don't deem worthwhile... You provide information to explain why your designs are on track. "That looks like a cartoon" -- Actually, Facebook's current trend is to use expressive illustration to represent its' users. ...


6

In 1973, it was hand drawn/painted. There's no reason to believe he didn't merely draw it all. And there's especially no reason to believe he didn't specifically hand color the image how he wanted. It's kind of insulting to him to think he couldn't have possibly drawn and colored the image. Of course he could have. That's what artists did in the 70s before ...


4

Yes, this is a problem. If you aren't pushing yourself to try new ideas and find interesting solutions, you aren't going to grow as a designer. Look up some of your favorite graphic designers, try to find 8-10 different pieces of their work. Spend some time identifying similarities between their pieces, and then spend time focusing on the differences. ...


4

Possible solution may be a Scatter Brush. If you create a "sketchy" brush as a Scatter Brush then set it to be relative to the path, you can get close. Every corner looks similar, but I think this is as close as you can get with any sort of "automated" method. Add an additional stroke and apply the scatter brush. Without the base stroke you get a very ...


4

I use different method in photoshop to achieve similar results. It all boils down to getting more details in the noise (by creating it on a bigger image/layer) and blowing up the contrast. Here is a short description of the process: 1. Create a new project at least twice in size of your original image If you want to add the effect on the whole image, ...


4

Photoshop Layer Styles are not compatible with Illustrator. In addition, there is no way to "convert" them. You would need to construct Illustrator styles within Illustrator.


4

By default, Illustrator's Blend is set to Smooth Color. This creates a blend between the color of the first object and the color of the last object. If there is no color variation, Illustrator's Blend default to Specified Steps. So to answer.. black to black is a specified Steps blend. Black to any other color is a smooth color blend. You can alter this ...


4

I'd say it's merely a Monochrome Vector Illustration. Maybe slip in "cartoon" or "comic" as a keyword. I don't think there's a specific name for the style itself.


4

In the United States, you can file a copyright with the Library of Congress (LOC) prior to production: See https://copyright.gov/ This does not prevent anyone copying the idea, but it does protect how you've implemented that idea (the artwork). It may still be lifted, but if your copyright is on file first at the Library of Congress, you have great footing ...


4

That looks like a good use of negative space to convey your message. Things to look out for: make sure the "7" shape doesn't look like it's a different font from the other numbers. keep it simple, try to not add too much detail to the torn paper that could obscure the shape of the "7". ensure there's good contrast between the empty shape and background so ...


3

Assuming you've already created your text and made it into a symbol... To wrap text around a cylinder in Illustrator you need to start by (wait for it...) creating a cylinder! (Make it a color which will contrast nicely with your text color) Create a smallish circle: Beginning with a smaller circle will make a narrower cylinder with less extrusion ...


3

Open a new blank image in Photoshop, add a new layer, and create a rectangular selection 25 pixels high. Fill it black. Copy and paste it and space it 25 pixels down, and repeat for a third stripe. Make sure Smart Guides are enabled, as it will make the task much easier. Select all three stripe layers, and group them. Press CTRL+T to transform, and rotate -...


3

Yes. This is what Graphic Styles in Illustrator are designed to do. More information can be found in Illustrator's Help Files : https://helpx.adobe.com/illustrator/using/graphic-styles.html It may also be beneficial to explore Symbols within Illustrator. Symbols are based more upon specific artwork than effects, but the use of Symbol Instances can be handy....


3

Disclaimer: This question is verging on a legal question, and since I am not a lawyer, this answer doesn't constitute legal advice. If you want legal advice hire a lawyer. You can't really do anything to prevent someone from stealing something you have designed, especially if it's something you are publishing publicly or something you are selling to the ...


2

I did some tests to see if I could find out what you were talking about... I figured it out. What you need to do is this... Go into the flyout menu of the Graphic Styles Panel Make sure that 'Override Character Color' is unchecked: Then apply your style... Hope this helps.


2

There's no perfect solution for this but my guess is the easiest way is to do this: Duplicate artboard in original file Detach all elements from symbol Copy/paste artboard into new file Change elements as needed I assume you'll be fiddling with the colors in some screens, not a whole bunch of them. If you need to repeat the same change multiple times you ...


2

Do not look for or at things you like. Look at stuff you do not like at first. Then make things that are deliberately "wrong". Take – say – half an hour to do a designers' version of Croquis - design fast, do not think too much. Five minutes max for each and over to the next one. Pen and paper will be the fastest and most flexible, so you do not get bogged ...


2

To get more granular control over textures, I would suggest using a placed PhotoShop file as a mask, rather than using AI’s raster system (which, as you have pointed out, does lead to resolution problems) PS - make a texture file, save it as a .psd AI - Place file above desired object AI - In the Transparency tab, click Make Mask You can edit the texture ...


2

If you have your company products you have your company artwork. You do not vectorize a photo of your own products, you use the original artwork. You either: 1) Generate a pure 3D render from scrach and prepare the materials accordingly to the 3D object (unwrap it) https://www.blender.org/ 2) Use some mockups, in this case a pile of toilet paper, and morph ...


2

Sorry, this isn't really going to provide a solution to a problem I experience a great deal. There really is no solution to this which I'm aware of. This is really the same for any "styles" feature in any Adobe application - Graphic Styles, Paragraph Styles, Character Styles, object Styles, Table Styles, Layer Styles, etc. in Photoshop, InDesign, ...


2

this is a lowpoly illustration. A simple google search shows similar photos


2

...A steel I-Beam looks like, well an "I". You're using a lowercase "L." If they don't care that its an I-Beam or just kinda look like steel beams in general than using Capital letters will probably be your best option. Serif fonts could also help: That was done in about 2 seconds right in Photoshop CC2015 with the New 3D Extrusion from Selected Layer ...


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