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18

As long as this is a clearly understood arrangement from the start from both parts, you certainly can. Be upfront about it, write a clear contract, and all is well. No designer would be offended/annoyed as long as it is abundantly clear from the start. Edit: As @Joojaa points out, a very important thing: make sure you agree on the software beforehand, so ...


12

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. "Interpret this brief" tests What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to: Give each candidate a plausible, basic design brief ...


9

Finding excellent designers are hard. Not because they are few, but because the MAIN thing is how you & the designers communicate, get along, like each other, understand each others standpoint and language, how the designer envisions your aims. Find designs you like, and find out who did it. Collect samples of what you like, so you have something to ...


9

If you're asking this question, 99% of the time you should hire someone. By asking this question you show that at least one (likely all of) the following are true: You care about the design enough to want it to be done very well (as you should). You don't feel very confident in your own ability to create a great logo. You don't have a very clear goal in ...


7

Your position is unusual but not that unusual, and you're lucky that, more than in other trades, good design recruiters are usually more interested in the quality of your portfolio and what it shows of your aesthetic sense, creativity and ability to meet a brief than they are in doing a box-ticking exercise on your resume. (but not all recruiters are good ...


7

Many of my clients have previously asked for the source files. It is important that you let the person you are working with that you intend to do that yourself. I am sure they will be happy to hand in the files, and if they won't, they will let you know from the start. Good luck!


7

I've been designing logos for 20 years and designing a logo for yourself is a difficult task. You need a good design process, time and confidence. If you can afford a good designer I would recommend that. If time is important then use a distinctive font and come back to the logo later. Many successful businesses have revised logos that are nothing like the ...


6

Determine your requirements. It sounds like you do not need a Graphic Designer which is a fairly broad term. You need a front-end web designer. You're developing the back end, are you using Wordpress, Rails, Django, Laravel or any other well known system? I would look for a front end designer with familiarity with that system. Particularly if doing Wordpress ...


6

I don't know if I'd call it a disconnect. This is a product of the desktop publishing era. Many small businesses (at least in the US) employ an in-house "marketing" person who does it all. They often learn graphics apps on the job or through some kind of on-line training. I've seen this first hand, coming in as a freelancer. One person who learns web and ...


6

The short answer is: there unfortunately usually aren't many motivations. It's a problem (some suggestions on how to help get designers involved below). If you look at open source projects, it's often very clear that no designers are heavily involved and that design elements are created by developers who have basic design skills: even for open-source design ...


6

Is this an arrangement someone would ever possibly agree to? Only entry level designers who don't know what they're doing. What you're asking for is a lot of work and for only name mention. You're asking them to gamble time and hard work on the chances that you'll be successful enough to support not only yourself but also their efforts. You're essentially ...


5

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


5

For a recent job opening, we were looking for a web designer. A lot of resumes we were seeing were print focused, lots of Adobe experience, and maybe they took a web class a year ago. The test I created was to ask candidates to live write a simple product prototype. Header, nav bar, 25% left column with secondary nav. I didn't care what tools or frameworks ...


5

I'm a big fan of multidisciplinary work so I really like how you're trying to make the best of both worlds. One potential area that I see is work with conductive inks and hybrid media. As both an electrical engineer and a graphic designer, it seems like you could be an asset as an hired consultant for people who want to inject some interactivity in their ...


4

Quite honestly... direct (snail) mail. A nice promotional package mailed to the Creative Director or Art Director. Phone calls show laziness. Emails will be seen purely as spam (unsolicited advertisements). A physical package delivered via mail shows interest, effort, direct attention, and a bit of research in the company (provided it's addressed to the ...


4

I wouldn't say those job descriptions are asking the candidate to actually be able to execute graphic design, but rather manage it--be it through vendors or other teams within the organization. Marketing and Graphic Design obviously are closely related and there is certainly overlap. It certainly doesn't hurt marketing folks to have some graphic design ...


4

If you are seeking a partner and not simply someone to do free work, you need to pitch to the designer the same way you'd pitch to any financial partner. After all, you are you are asking for an investment on the part of the designer. You need to explain and/or convince the designer that the service or product is something they would like to invest in. Make ...


4

You're asking how best to find people to do work for free. This is called spec work and is frowned upon by the industry: http://www.no-spec.com/ On top of that, it's a bad idea. Do you think you will get talented, experienced people that like working for free? In general, my advice for finding a graphic designer: pick a portfolio of good work and then ...


4

The one place you'll find some of the most incredible designers: http://www.dribbble.com


4

Further to what @user568458 said in the comment above about my answer on the other question: Try writing it in your contract with the designer. I AM NOT A LAWYER AND THIS IS NOT LEGAL WORDING. This is just a suggestion. You should run this by an actual lawyer, and I have no idea if this will hold up in court. But I think it's a decent start, and as a ...


4

Should you hire a [plumber] or just [fix the toilet] in a way you are not satisfied with? Should you hire a [mechanic] or just [guess what's wrong with the car] in a way you are not satisfied with? Should you hire a [lawn care service] or just [use that old push mower] in a way you are not satisfied with? This isn't a graphic design question. It's a ...


4

As a 15 year old You're planning ahead! That's great! A lot of us ended up in the field by going to school for it. Graphic Design is a field of study in a lot of colleges and universities. Some of them are BA (Bachelor of Arts) degrees, while some are BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts). The latter tends to be more of a full fledged art school where you'd be ...


3

Purely opinion... Open Source is for hobbyist or "moonlighting" designers primarily. Not exclusively, but primarily. If a designer has a 9 to 5 job where they can depends upon a paycheck and life's necessities, then they tend to spend their spare time doing the things they want to do which may or may not always be what their employer pays them to do. If ...


3

EDIT: Comments are correct in that this doesn't strictly answer the question. I saw two matters here, one being the finding the correct person and the other the interviewing, and I went for the first. For me, the interviewing is a tool to reach the first. Creative thinking is definitely a must, but I'd actually try to find designers that can demonstrate ...


3

Write a really good cover letter Your prospective employer, if they're worth working for, wants to know where your passions lie and that you can communicate well. Depending on what kind of org you want to work in, show a little personality and skip the overly formal accountant-type letter. Make sure your work samples rock Once you have their interest, ...


3

What I'd suggest is first check if there are any open positions that fit your skills, and then maybe also write cold applications (they may not be very likely to get you a job, but you never know). Write a short letter explaining why you are valuable (as usual) and add a portfolio with your best pieces. As it was said before, I also think it counts a lot ...


3

In my experience, a good portfolio is (almost) all you need. Experience is of course very, very valuable, but if you have been freelancing and you can showcase your work, everything else will come second. If I have to hire another designer, I don't care about their training. Now, of course, I am not a company or a studio. For them, having experience in the ...


3

I do use freelancer.com quite a bit, but have used them for web development mainly. I am considering using them for graphic design as well. Do think a cultural connection is more important here so would go for a designer connected to the culture/background of the client. Different cultures tend to produce different styles and these styles might by too loud ...


3

Farray and DA01 both make excellent points that you should take to heart. Whether you intend it or not, your question boils down to, "How can I get people to give me free design ideas for my new product?", so there is something fundamentally wrong with both the thought process and the business plan. If your project is worthwhile and the business plan makes ...


3

I think there is some confusion. Looking for a designer who is willing to do work on the promise of future profit-sharing and other compensation is not spec work. That's just the nature of many startups. However, asking a designer to someone to come up with "rough ideas they might have for the product" while not guaranteeing any sort of compensation or ...


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