New answers tagged

3

What you have is an icon which has been converted from line to shape. Which means you will have to find a not-converted icon or redraw the lines yourself manually to be then able to apply a dashed style to the line (aka: stroke). Once you have an actual line shape, you can apply a dashed line via 'Window → Stroke' and play with the numbers in red highlight ...


11

At first glance, this may look like a typographical overshoot, i.e., round bases and tops of letters extending a bit further up- or downwards than flat ones – which accounts for an optical illusion. However, if you look closely, you will note that the logo and the S already feature an overshoot in the original. Also, in the corrected version, the overshoot ...


9

In typography, this is called an overshoot. And has been a very long-standing practice. In typeface design, the overshoot of a round or pointed letter (like O or A) is the degree to which it extends higher or lower than a comparably sized "flat" letter (like X or H), to achieve an optical effect of being the same size; it compensates for inaccuracies in ...


1

It's just a simple gradient of two colors. I replicated it in photoshop by using the eye dropper tool to get the top and bottom color (put them as foreground and background colors) and then used the gradient tool as a straight vertical line from the very top of the icon to the very bottom. Although I would recommend to not use the exact same colors as a ...


1

See now me, I would've done a "standard" symbology wrapped into a black circle to keep your figure-ground consistency. Then again, this kind of thing is very specifically up my alley anyway - architectural illustration / graphics. Something perhaps along this direction, but better developed (this was ~ 4 minutes) and more carefully matched to the website ...


2

You want to use recognisable icons so the user immediately recognises the information, and can also associate it with the same information on multiple listings.


2

Add an outer stroke to the central shape Go to menu Object → Expand Press Cmd + Shift + Alt + 8 Mac or Ctrl + Shift + Alt + 8 Win to Release the Compound Shape Press Cmd + Shift + G Mac or Ctrl + Shift + G Win to Ungroup Select all and press Shift + M to activate the Shape Builder Tool and click in every part of the outer stroke holding Alt to delete ...


2

Your name says dolphin, but your logo, and particular your icon doesn’t say dolphin. I know there is a tiny fin and waves, but this is more whispering dolphin than saying it. Here are two quick sketches of how you could scream dolphin (if that’s what you want): Another advantage is that it reads more like a D and thus makes your entire name more readable. ...


2

It's olphix + a shape in front of it. Let your name be visible as a whole. It's very difficult to mix an icon and a letter as one symbol without generating reading errors. You haven't succeeded. It's much easier to write Dolphix and insert a separate icon. Another thing: It somehow resembles a text in a medicine or food supplement package, like this: ...


7

Sorry if this comes across a bit harsh. It's honestly not meant to be anything other than helpful. I have no stake in how good or bad your logo may be. I can only offer some suggestions I would follow in my own effort to create a logo for myself, or another designer in general. You are posting this at a design-oriented site asking designers about a logo for ...


1

I can give you some recommendations while creating your logo: While the typographic part seems to be that you already have it resolved, I think you should forget it for now and focus on the image I would also propose to forget the color issue for the time being, color sometimes distracts us from the main idea, at the beginning of the development of a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included