29

The purpose of a timeline is to show how the dots (or events in your case) break the line, so no need to squeeze the dots inside the line. Also adding bananas or cherries at the ends of the line and a pattern behind all this can affect the meaning and visibility of the actual break points. I would decrease the thickness of the line and make the dots larger, ...


11

I don't feel the colors "jump out" in any way. I think the contrast ratio is far too low. for everything other than the darkest blue. In fact,that light blue and light yellow are nearly impossible to see. The variation between the darker blues is so minute, one would need to be specifically looking for that aspect to pick up on it. If it were my work, I'd ...


8

The re-use of similar shapes, patterns, spacing, type, colour and other elements throughout a design can simply be referred to as Repetition. I would say that the Premier League example you provided demonstrates simple repetition. However there are terms for repetition at different scales which you might find interesting: Self-Similarity refers to "a ...


7

Yes But being creative or artistic does not necessarily mean "ability to draw". Creativity is a must-have. A good designer needs to be able to imagine/see information in various constructs, envision color usage, often determine imagery to be used. All this takes creative thinking. While you generally don't have to be creative enough to come up with earth-...


6

An A4 sized paper is 1/4 the size of an A0 poster. Work on a a4 paper, print it and view it. Calculate that it will look the same as an A0 poster viewed at 4 times the distance. If you can see it ok at 1 m, the poster will look the same at 4 m. Make decisions based on that. P.S. The font size you are using, for example, 28 pts, will be 7 pts... too small....


5

There's no such setting. Illustrator simply does not function that way. You may be accustomed to Photoshop creating new layers for everything. Those are necessary in Photoshop. They aren't needed in Illustrator. The only time Illustrator creates a new Layer is when the user tells it to. In other words, if you want a new layer you have to manually create it. ...


5

What you have is an icon which has been converted from line to shape. Which means you will have to find a not-converted icon or redraw the lines yourself manually to be then able to apply a dashed style to the line (aka: stroke). Once you have an actual line shape, you can apply a dashed line via 'Window → Stroke' and play with the numbers in red highlight ...


4

The referenced artist in question calls them "paint sculptures", and says this about the approach: Technique: acrylic paint brush strokes scanned & composed in Photoshop And has an image posted called production assets which looks like this: So though I love @user287001's proposed method, I can pretty confidently say that it isn't the one used by ...


4

In branding, it used to be common for designers to define a 'visual language' based on shapes derived or cropped from the actual logo. Arguably this is not so much 'in fashion' anymore, since large brands started minimizing their guidelines and most startups in recent years just went with typo-looking logos. Vodafone are using that bubble in their logo as a ...


4

This is not a specific effect, but instead a single leaf-looking shape, duplicated 3 times with colors adjusted and opacity probably set to 'Multiply'. There is no 'click-there-to-do-this' solution, it is most likely done manually.


4

Creative, yes. Almost any job in the world needs some kind of creative input. Artistic, not necessarily. Depends on what you're designing and what time you have available. You can't be artistic in 5 minutes. There's many designers out there that are creative, but not artistic. You could, in a way, say that illustrators generally tend to be more artistic ...


3

"Re-use and repetition of certain elements" is practically a dictionary definition of motif. A repeated visual motif is used in many forms of design and art, and is often integral to a brand identity. Motif need not involve scale contrast or silhouettes though, nor does it have to be derived from the logo (although very common). The most famous example I ...


3

That looks like mid-century modern style or mid-mod for short. It is characterized by quirky angular characters, cartoon eyes, and bold vintage colors. Some Hanna-Barbera material is similar such as the Pink Panther and the Flintstones, so you might also find examples by looking for the Hanna-Barbera style. In your example, there is also a limited palette ...


3

I think the banner would be more likely to draw people in if the character was made much bigger. While that doesn't change the colors you are using, it would change the proportion at which they're used; you would get more of the flesh color which is close to the complementary (blue/orange) and efficient at catching attention. In addition, getting closer to ...


3

That blue is much too dark, needs to be more cheerful. Add a bit of color and texture to the background, plus everything else is too white. Make the website a big purple round cornered button. Also the man in the middle needs to stand out, so needs a bit of contrast / different color scheme. Some inspiration below.


3

It is too dark. A brand color especially if its such a dark one doesn't need to be the entire piece like that. Look at the histogram of your piece, here's an Answer of mine on Photography explaining a little: Photography.Stackexchange: Can I tell which photo has more contrast from their histograms In general you want a piece to have a nice full range. And ...


3

The text is way too small particularly in the 3-steps section. Increase the font size dramatically and find a way to format these. The contacts section can sit under the 3-steps, but don't push it down too much, try to leave some space at the bottom. Alternatively, move the title above the illustration and center-aligned, then the 3-steps just below the ...


3

You should definitely move the name and/or logo to the top. You want to make sure people looking for the booth can find it, and assume someone is going to be standing in front of it. The text is both too small and too wordy. Assuming you mocked it up with roughly the same character counts of course. Once you make these much larger you'll have less space at ...


3

What you see in that image can easily be achieved with a 2D app like Inkscape, but if you really need to learn 3D, try Blender or Sketchup all of which are good, free options.


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