36

The hole in a real VW is a common sheet metal trick named "Rounded Louver". Realistic drawing of a louver needs complex shading. It's easiest if you can accept it as bent inwards, without shiny glosses and without a chrome edge list. Here are three of them on a flat surface: One louver is made by interpolating between a black line and blue edge ...


17

I think it depends on the art style you want to go for. If you're doing a flat design style like in your first image, then you can replicate the vents by using 2 rounded-rectangles that overlap. If you're going with the other images, then it would be a similar process. Draw the shapes and use gradients.


8

Yes But being creative or artistic does not necessarily mean "ability to draw". Creativity is a must-have. A good designer needs to be able to imagine/see information in various constructs, envision color usage, often determine imagery to be used. All this takes creative thinking. While you generally don't have to be creative enough to come up with ...


7

You could use a Scatter Brush in Illustrator rather than a pattern brush. Simply draw one shape... however you want no gradients or effects though, simple fills and strokes. And choose Scatter Brush after dragging the art to the Brush Panel. From there, it's a matter of adjusting the brush options. Be certain to set the Rotation Relative To: to path rather ...


6

When I'm struggling with the 'realism' of a design, I oftentimes find myself referencing photography. What you are looking for is ambient light: the light which is already in the room before any objects are added. (which is also kinda what user287001 is hinting at) In your case, the ambient light is warm yellow sunlight, coming in through the orange ...


5

No. In a 2D drawing program you must force 2 things to match: The geometry and its interaction with light. 2D programs know nothing of the 3D space and how material reflects light there, so it's up to you to make the things to fit. Well trained painters and draughtsmen can do it, but the needed amount of talent and practicing is beyond the capabilities of ...


5

Creative, yes. Almost any job in the world needs some kind of creative input. Artistic, not necessarily. Depends on what you're designing and what time you have available. You can't be artistic in 5 minutes. There's many designers out there that are creative, but not artistic. You could, in a way, say that illustrators generally tend to be more artistic ...


5

First, add objects for intermediate steps. If you examine your sample it blends from medium > small > large > small > medium. There are 5 stages to that blend. So you need 5 objects. Here I've shown the intermediate steps as red circles. And then created the blend. Remember stacking order matters. Blend stack, by default, from the top object to the bottom ...


5

Not asked, but as well you can try blending. It has a plus: You can get a series of shapes which evolve from the beginning to the end. Or they can as well have the same form, they only scale and rotate. Controlling the spacing isn't possible, blending distributes the intermediate versions quite uniformly between the start and stop shapes. You can edit the ...


4

What you see in that image can easily be achieved with a 2D app like Inkscape, but if you really need to learn 3D, try Blender or Sketchup all of which are good, free options.


4

If the room must stay low contrast brown reduce the contrast of the box and person: This is not actually a fix. The person and the box are now dull, too. You can fix this by making the window brighter and letting it cause some light on the surfaces. Common consistent light binds the parts together. A simplified example (the floor is untreated and the ...


4

This question is opinion based. But here is my logic. As you are asking for "design principles" I should say: 1. The design should be intuitive 2. If the design is not intuitive enough you should provide the clues to decode it I am not sure if evoking another-separated design logic (some clock hands) is the right approach unless your building has 12 ...


4

Design and/or Illustration is a profession. Like any profession there are some things one can often do themselves without any actual training. It's not like it takes a PhD to understand what looks good to you or in order for a person draw. However, like any profession the more specialized you want the results to be the more knowledge of the profession you ...


3

Quickly? No. Could you do it with some time, practice and skill? Yes. Using three pen-drawn bézier curves and the blend tool I've created one single fold - you can see how it could work to then build that up to create skeins of fabric: But it would be neither fast nor efficient. Sorry took me so long to complete my answer - I just didn't have time to put ...


3

Yes and no, and this answer is going to be wildly unpopular but bear with me. I feel that its really the other way around*. It all depends on what you mean by creative. If you would have asked me this question 5 years ago I would have answered no. Today i have to sadly answer yes but not because of the reason most people think but basically having worked in ...


3

What you are looking at isn't weird but the artboard setup for video. They indicate the safe area for a screen, where the center of the screen would be and ruler around the outside. The easiest way to resolve this is to simply not select a template from the Video and Film collection when you are setting up a new artboard. However, you can easily change these ...


2

I've seen this same question a few times recently. There's no name for it, really, ok its a "trend" right now, everybody seems to be doing it, but nobody gave it an actual name. This guy Cosmin Serban sure does use the term flat illustration alot on his Youtube channel where you probably have that second screenshot from. The name flat 2.0 illustration seems ...


2

Left one Why I prefer the left.... It's clear in message placement is interesting at a glance (because it's not all centered) The concept of a magnifying glass and search is instantly perceived What I'd do to alter the left one... Consider placement a bit more. There doesn't seem to be any direct thought as to why elements are placed where they are. By ...


2

You can't get that with the Drop Shadow effect, but instead: Select your original T shape Do an offset via Object → Path → Offset Path Create a copy of the offset shape and ALT+SHIFT+Drag diagonally Create an Object → Blend between these 2 offset shapes with 'Specified Distance' set to 0


2

Google Maps offers a very extensive API for style customisation. You can customise almost any element. This is done through a Javascript API: the styles are saved in a JSON structure and then applied when the map is loaded in your website. You can find the full documentation here. But Google also offers a Wizard which lets you control almost all of the ...


2

A quick search with Flat Illustration gives me plenty of similar examples, that uses simple shapes, flat (solid) colors and shadows. It also includes similar examples with textures and gradients, some with more details.


2

Draw the top floor at 12 o'clock and the bottom floor at 6 o'clock. Draw the rest near their relative elevations even numbers to the right and odd numbers to the left, have floor number identifiers and lines which point to right elevation in the tower shape. If the floors have some special names let them be well visible, too. More complex floors can have ...


2

No, there is no standard way — use your best judgement. However, yes, it does make sense to have the GF at 6 o'clock. I would also apply a numbered tag to each floor plan to make it easier to follow: GF, 1F, 2F, etc.


2

Forget software. It helps AFTER you get plausible results with traditional drawing tools on paper. Get a pencil. Software doesn't invent the needed forms, you must be able to imagine them and present them with lines, curves and shadings. If you are a beginner you must walk the same route as the others who can draw. Get books, study and draw and draw and ...


2

My personal opinion, is that this does not appear "amateurish" to me. However, I think it may be a bit child-like for more professional educational services. I would expect education geared towards a younger demographic if I saw that logo. The last thing on my mind would be more adult, or professional-level, courses. In fact, I'd see the logo and ...


2

Realistically speaking no, its not possible to gain something without expending some work. So with absolutely no skill you can not get anything done. There is a category of software that might help: Most known of these is Poser. Essentially its a software that has pre made drawings that you can yourself pose. However this does not work well with your desire ...


2

Does buying the tools to fix a car instantly make you a car mechanic? Does inheriting a million dollars instantly make you an investor in the stock market? No & no. Skill is unfortunatelly something you need to learn, even with the tools on the table. What I recommend you try is to look at stock sites and - not sure but maybe - you can find the exact ...


2

The color of the bottom object stays and the color of the top object vanishes when making an intersecion in A.Designer. Try instead of intersection operation named "Divide". Delete the extras. Before: After applying "Divide" and moving the pieces apart: You may still need the duplicate of the rectangle because like in many other ...


2

"Pop art" seems to fit the bill to me. It really doesn't matter if an illustration is created in a traditional manner or digital manner. That doesn't necessary alter the name of a style, if there even is a name (not everything has a name).


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