14

I can't tell you if this technique has a name as such. You are certainly on the right track with Posterize and Threshold, but I believe the main "effect" used here is the color mode Indexed Color. Just applying an effect won't be enough to achieve this style though. The images you post have other things in common: they all have high contrast, lots ...


9

Looks like the Noise Dither pattern you get when converting to Indexed Colour Mode, with a low number of colours. For example zoomed detail


9

My suspicion is that this has everything to do with the fact that Gaussian Blur is a rasterised effect. It basically converts your object into pixels (gasp!) and then applies a Photoshop effect to it—hence the 'Photoshop Effects' mention in the Effect menu. As Pixels take up memory space and thus CPU power, it seems reasonable to create an upper limit to the ...


8

All the menu items under the Effects > Photoshop Effects > section are raster effects. This may or may not be appropriate for any project. However, if the goal is to retain things in exportable vector form, then the "Photoshop Effects" should generally be avoided or used minimally. Many of the raster effects are constrained to the shape's ...


6

Getting the same non-repeating random complexity than your linked image has is much easier in a bitmap image editor (GIMP, Photoshop etc...)than in Illustrator. I guess it's a real painting which has intentional scratches in the top color layers. Having it as a vector in Illustrator has advantages. One of them is free scalability without pixelation nor blur. ...


6

You want to switch to photoshop for this one. And then either use the brushes to paint the forms or find a suitable texture. Mostly grunge textures are good for this sort of stuff. https://texturelabs.org/?ct=25&pg=1 Original Grunge texture Overlaid with texture (blending mode 'screen'): Edges will need separate treatment, either with a textured brush ...


4

Actually, it probably is working or has been applied successfully but since there's only one color, you can't observe it (unless you zoom in a lot and notice some rough edges). Just like your problem, for example, I've applied the crystallize effect to this shape, but I can't notice it in my shape. According to official Adobe's user guide: Effect > ...


4

Since you mentioned GIMP, here's a simple method Fill a bacgkround layer with the colour you want Create a new white layer, and apply the noise filter. Set the layer mode to Multiply Create a new transparent layer. Choose the Chalk 02 brush, set to a large size, increase the Spacing in the Tool options. Then paint to create a random texture, lower the ...


3

You asked how to use the crystallize effect to get smooth wrinkly edges. Here's one way: The shape which needs the edge treatment The shape embedded into a bigger differently colored shape - it's needed because you want to see the effect with no tricks. In this phase you should also rasterize the combo because it will be rasterized anyway, as you knew ...


3

I think it will be difficult for you to find a filter or effect that will reproduce this in one click. It looks to me like your sample image has several different texture overlays applied to it- one that lightens the base color and one that darkens the base color in places. I suggest that if you are really into this then try some of your own and come back if ...


3

A guess: You have it only as a low resolution bitmap and you need a vector version. In this case trace it and forget the idea to make an exact replica by applying some distortion transform to a less curved pattern of ellipses. There's too many unknown variables that should be guessed right. A mathematician might find the wanted transformation rule, but for ...


3

I did it in photoshop. photoshop effect. can be much better.


3

I can't comment on the overall workflow without a full understanding of it... which I'm not going to get via small comments here. My point in my comment was... I, myself, tend to hesitate to mix applications merely because one aspect of one design is taking time to render. It seems to me that you are creating more work merely because AI can be slow to render....


3

I don't think Illustrator is the best tool for this, so I'll show a solution for Photoshop. Don't know if you're interested in that. Let's start with some slightly blurred image. First use Filter > Pixelate > Mosaic to pixelate the image. Here I used these settings: Then use Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask to apply those shadows to the pixels. ...


3

Building textures in vector is not easy. Especially if you want the effect to actually be a vector, rather than a pixel effect inside of Illustrator. A good trick that I use these days is to start in Photoshop and then vectorise in Illustrator. Create a mid to high resolution image in Photoshop that has the texture you want. You can create this from scratch ...


3

Seemingly you have already got an explanation and how to persuade Illustrator to be less stingy when deciding how big raster image will be generated as the result of Gaussian blur effect. The already given workaround (=use Feather) doesn't expand the shape like Gaussian blur, but makes the edges thinner - you may need to make an offset path to get the blur ...


2

I will separate my answer into several parts. You are asking about the quality of the glow. But in the workflow you describe, it seems that you are rasterizing not only the glow but also the shapes that are generating it. Depending on the process, the colors, the intended output, etc, you can, not only lose the ability to edit your main shape, but also have ...


2

Unfortunately the items listed under "Photoshop Effects" are applied raster effects and must have a background. They can't be created without the auto-generated background. So, what can one do? Create the effect where the use of white doesn't matter or means "transparent" -- such as on a mask. Apply the effect to an Opacity Mask rather ...


2

The original array may have had rotated ellipses (at the left had side). Possibly using a step blend to make each row. Maybe something like this Then distorted with a 2 x 2 Envelope Mesh This is fine if you are happy enough with something similar, however since you want the exact same form, I think it would be really difficult to use that method to ...


1

Easiest way: Create the L as a thick stroke and set it to round edges. Convert this to a shape via Object → Path → Outline stroke. Then, create a rectangle and do a pathfinder subtract and remove that part where you need straight corners.


1

Create a long rectangle shape and fill monochrome gradient. Preferably (say 70%) transparent. Duplicate it several times to create a set. Group all and again copy and paste same and reverse the gradient direction (or horizontally flip the group). Combine both groups. Group them again and make a copy and rotate it 90 degress and place over it. Now group ...


1

Enable Smart Guides so that you can see when the anchor intersects the V-shaped path. Hold down Shift to constrain the path vertically


1

Yes I got it, it is done with the offset path and nudge, thanks @joojaa .


1

You could use Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Mesh. Set the number of rows the same as the number of lines of text, and columns to 1. Then edit the mesh using the Direct Selection Tool A. In the example below, to get this to work better, I also converted the text to outlines and added an invisible box around the text and grouped them, so that the ...


1

Select the shape and choose Object > Expand Appearance from the menu. This will "bake in" the effect and remove the dynamic or "live" aspect of it.


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