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14

Choose magic wand tool set options to: 1, levels Tolerance Anti-alias on Click on background white Holding shift down click inside handle, to add to the existing selection. Invert selection shift+ctrl+I Make a new adjustment layer Solid color, white Apply a layer style of stroke Done. Your values may be different as scale might change things. Image 1: ...


14

Centerline Tracing The method you are looking for is "centerline tracing". This converts a bitmap to a vector line rather than an object graphic. Very few tracers will be able to do that. There is a free Open Source tool AutoTrace which does this fairly well but with limitations depending on the quality of the source image. Tracing the signature you ...


10

What is happening is when you trace your image, Illustrator is making your "transparent background" into "white space". What you need to do is remove this from your trace. 1.Menu > Window > Image Trace 2.A new window will open. This will give you a lot of trace options you can play with and the one in particular you are looking for is under the ...


9

You can't protect the graphics 100% from copycats and thieves, but you can make it too much work for them and they'll change target. Know that in the fashion industry, even before internet, lot of cheap manufacturers would travel to higher quality shops and simply take pictures of the prints with a mini-camera; then ask their designers to reproduce the ...


9

This may not be the most efficient method, but here is what I do: Take the file into photoshop, fiddle with the levels and brightness-contrast to get a high contrast image. Then make it black and white and maybe fiddle a little more with the contrast. Remove the background (the white), and save it as an image with transparency (e.g. png). Then, in ...


8

I would do the following: Open the bitmap with a raster graphics editor like GIMP. Use a paint bucket tool to fill in the areas so you have solid black shapes, instead of outlines. Clean up any rough edges or gaps in your fill. Use Inkscape to trace the filled in version you just produced, and then delete the bitmap. Style the resulting path with a ...


8

The bad news: With automatic tracing algorithms alone, you won't be able to get a clean result. There will always be noise. The good news: If you're willing to invest just a bit of effort in manual cleanup, you can get a very decent vectorized reconstruction. This is what I was able to get in roughly 5 minutes: (Click on the image for a high-res version or ...


7

Its is not so easy using Illustrator, but definitely it is easier using one of the 3D environment packages using the "Camera Match" feature. It is harder in illustrator because: The cup is not a perfect cylinder. When extruding a cylinder in Illustrator you have to match it with the cylinder on the Lego guy manually. anyway here what you have to do. First ...


6

I find I get myself into this situation when I've cut'n'pasted a bitmap image directly into Illustrator and then the Object / Image Trace image has all greyed out options and the Window / Image Trace has no buttons available. The solution I've found is to Object / Rasterize... it first, as the moment the item is pasted into Illustrator it is an "object" ...


6

You have so many options with "Automatic Tracing Solutions" using Photoshop by CTRL select your layer and convert the marquee into Path. using trace in Illustrator using Corel Trace if you have using a free online tool called "Magic Vector" and it can convert your scanned image into any vector format. personally I prefer this tool so much, as it is the most ...


5

After reading comments under the question.... Photoshop has basic path editing capabilities. That is not to say they are lacking for the most part, but there are some areas which Photoshop is not as robust as Illustrator. Remember vector items are an addition to Photoshop, not it's core goal. For Photoshop, you need to use the Pen Tool to draw a vector ...


5

Potracegui I recommend you to download the GUI interface for potrace and autotrace, which contains two algorithms for tracing bitmapped images. It collects informations in an easy way (hopefully) and then it launches potrace or autotrace with all the relevant options. Using a GUI sometimes is more comfortable that using command line, it is more interactive, ...


5

Let's say we have 2 shapes as on your picture (face + head). I make these two shapes overlapping with the face layer below the "head": I duplicate the head layer, Select 1 head and face layers and by Pathfinder operation Minus Back get this perfect match - Next: Let's say you should create long ray as you asked. I choose on Direct Selection Tool (A) ...


5

Grab the Pen Tool and manually draw two paths - one around the bulk of the pitcher, ignoring the handle, then one around the handle. Then combine the vector/shape layers for the shapes into one layer. Add a stroke if a vector layer, or add a stroke via Layer Styles.


5

Never assume the logo file you are given by any client is the "best" they have. This is especially true if the file is a raster image. If the client does not provide a vector version of their logo, the chances that there are higher quality raster images on the web are generally pretty good. In this case, a quick google reverse image search finds a much ...


5

You could use the centerline trace extension available from here: https://github.com/fablabnbg/inkscape-centerline-trace to trace your scanned image in Inkscape. Or you could set the simplifying threshold in the settings: Edit > Preferences > Behavior : Simplification threshold. Applied to the question's line drawing: The transformation takes about 10 ...


4

Smart guides (ctrl-u / cmd-u) can help, but they aren't always enough, especially on curves. Often it's best to overlapping path lines - if it's solid fill it might be better to just go underneath, and if it's empty outlines it might be better to just stop when you connect the line (like you would if drawing on paper: you wouldn't carefully draw over the ...


4

Start with a very high resolution raster effect: Maybe 1200 ppi. Apply a slight blur to eliminate any evidence of aliased pixels. Spend some real quality time with the multitude of variables in Illustrator's trace settings. You can make surprising changes with small adjustments. And don't forget that this is low tech effect.


4

I may be misunderstanding your question, but I don't imagine there is a simple way for GIMP (or any other graphics program) to discern and color arbitrary regions on an image with a unique color. How would it know things like Great Britain or United States having multiple geographically-separated regions but color them the same? You'd better buckle down ...


4

First, it may sound obvious, but check your links panel and make sure you don't have that pesky png laying around the pasteboard somewhere. I've noticed that a lot of designers instinctively dupe the image prior to expanding paths "just in case". In terms of the final vector art itself, you basically have two options. Cut down the number of vectors via ...


4

There are no cells in a PDF file, just graphics objects. What you see is not a cell but a background color square. The original file has added white color labels to some of the items yes. It seems to be that they have set a white background while others have not. This is not an error in illustrator but jus something the original author did. You can simply ...


4

If you have an image to trace which consists of white on transparent background, invert the pixels by going to Edit > Edit Colors > Invert Colors, which will turn the white parts to black. Now you can trace it with the "Ignore White" option on. You can always color your accepted result into any other color after you expand the tracing.


4

Raster image editors like GIMP or Photoshop are practically useless for what you are trying to do. They only have very basic vector support. They aren't the right tool for the job. The only real way to do this is to use a vector image editor, and redraw the work in vectors, by hand. If you want an SVG, then Inkscape is free and Open Source, or if you have ...


4

Once you Expand a Live Trace, the tracing options are no longer available. There is no way to "go back" and edit the options used in tracing other than to Undo or start over. If you merely want to remove the white background when live tracing, tick the Ignore White option on the Image Trace Panel under the Advanced Options.


3

If I understand you correctly, the pathfinder tool is the answer for you. Go to Window > Pathfinder to open the Pathfinder window, select both shapes you want to join and press the Unite button in the pathfinder window (it's the first one.) That should do the trick.


3

When Illustrator traces an image it searches for details and creates paths, and it does it pretty well, it never has the sharp detail of the original photo but I like the artistic look it applies. Vector files store all their information as mathematical values, allowing them to scale to any size, this means a small vector image's file size probably won't ...


3

Draw your box filled with your pattern over the artwork. From here you have a couple options: This assumes your pattern has "holes" in it and is not a solid-filled pattern. Select all and click the Make Mask on the Transparency Panel. You may need to uncheck the Clip option on the panel or check the Invert option on the panel. Select the pattern box and ...


3

The problem is basically in the way Inkscape is deciding to split your image into color regions: instead of simply having the lighter colors overlap the darker ones (or vice versa), you're ending up with two adjacent color areas that both overlap a third color. Since the edges don't line up perfectly (due to both tracing inaccuracies, and also some ...


3

Make it not white before using Illustrator. Although, depending upon the artwork, there may be better options than using Image Trace in Illustrator. For example.... merely export paths to Illustrator from within Photoshop.


3

You must Expand your image after tracing. Then just ungroup and you're done.


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