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I would look at the number of anchor points you have in the SVG file. More anchors points can typically increase the file size as there is more information to be rendered. I opened the two SVG files in Illustrator and screen shot them in outline mode. (It's easier to see the actual paths this way) This one has 156 anchors points This one has 686 anchors ...


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SVG files use uncompressed, human-readable text to describe an image so that it can be recreated with a render engine, such as the one included in your browser. PNG files use compressed binary data to store exact binary information. Human-readable text will always have some size overhead compared to vague binary dataflags that only need to be a few bytes (...


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The SVG file is bigger because it contains more data (in the form of paths and nodes) in comparison to the data contained in the PNG. SVGs aren't really comparable to PNG images. One is vector, the other is raster, and never the twain shall meet! It's as if you are making an assumption that SVGs should be as small as a PNG, and that isn't always the case. ...


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We use the term pixels in seemingly different contexts. We call the raw image samples in a raster image "pixels" and we seemingly call the imaging element on a output screen a pixel. This makes more sense if you understand that there must be sample data for each imaging element unit in the graphics card. So even if you talk about physical imaging elements ...


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I love this question. Congratulations, either you are a philosopher or a really technical guy! An image file contains data points (DPs) with rgb values. In graphics arts and resolution "DP" Stands for "Dots per". A "dot" is the minimum element of a printed image. The difference is that on a printed image you either have a dot or you do not have it. On ...


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