14

This is a small item, so avoid filling precious whitespace by containing every element into its own separate box. Instead, break the design down into 2 sections for better separation between the top part (general overview) and bottom part (detailed 'specs'). For instance, you could leave the top against a white background, and only use the yellowish ...


11

This is an opinion based answer, and there is no right or wrong here. Generally, I quite like the basic style of it. It's very traditional in a kind of educational establishment way. However in my opinion the main problem here is the way you have listed the various features centred on two lines. I don't think there's anything wrong with the fonts. It's just ...


6

Precise isometric view Select Container Frame Copy height to clipboard Set Rotation Angle to -30 Set Shear X Angle to 30 Select Content Frame Paste in the height from before Fit frame to content Eyeballed axonometric view Select the Content Frame Rotate it to your liking Select the Container Frame Scale the height to your liking


5

Great thanks to everybody for your replies! I found it difficult to place all the information under icons, so I ended up with aligning the first column right and the second left, as suggested by Lucian. Made 'CLASS' the same size as features. Also listed the features in one line, separated by commas, as suggested by Billy Kerr, and made their font a bit ...


3

For parallel projection only, no other perspectives: Apply Object > Transform > Shear. Then Scale and rotate with the normal selection tool for good apparent proportions. You can also find good numerical values for shearing, scale and rotate. InDesign remembers numerical values for repeated work. An example of the result: Here the shearing is horizontal ...


3

This question is opinion based. But here is my logic. As you are asking for "design principles" I should say: 1. The design should be intuitive 2. If the design is not intuitive enough you should provide the clues to decode it I am not sure if evoking another-separated design logic (some clock hands) is the right approach unless your building has 12 ...


2

Draw the top floor at 12 o'clock and the bottom floor at 6 o'clock. Draw the rest near their relative elevations even numbers to the right and odd numbers to the left, have floor number identifiers and lines which point to right elevation in the tower shape. If the floors have some special names let them be well visible, too. More complex floors can have ...


2

No, there is no standard way — use your best judgement. However, yes, it does make sense to have the GF at 6 o'clock. I would also apply a numbered tag to each floor plan to make it easier to follow: GF, 1F, 2F, etc.


1

This is anything but sure because you haven't revealed what "put on screen " means. I guess you have a partially transparent layer which has complex black and white gradient patterns. On a background layer they look not so pleasant: But if you set the blending mode =Screen, the effect is what's wanted: Now you search a way to store the decorative shape ...


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