5

Convert the rectangle to paths by selecting it and clicking Path > Object to Path, or Shift+Ctrl+C Select everything with the Select and Transform Objects Tool F1 Switch to the Edit Paths by Nodes tool F2, then hold down Shift while clicking and dragging to select all the nodes of the rectangle plus the bottom nodes of the curves. Select any additional ...


4

I think I'd use the InkTan extension to generate the outline. Still needs a bit of path joining afterwards, but it will be exact by default. https://github.com/Rhysun/inkTan To turn these three objects into a single one, connect the ends of the tangents with new segments, so they form a rectangle, then do Path > Union with all three objects.


4

There's a drop shadow SVG filter, but the shapes are being cropped by the dimensions of Flood effect of the filter. To fix it, open the SVG in Inkscape (since it was created in Inkscape). Select one of the objects, and click Filters > Filter Editor In the filter editor select the "Flood" effect, and select the Filter General Settings tab. Manually adjust ...


2

That's not how clipping works. A clipping path needs to be a single path, or a compound path. If you want to do it using a clipping mask, instead draw a simple shape with curves using the Bézier tool, then apply that as the clipping mask. Example: Result of applying clipping path shown right Another completely different method is not to use a clipping ...


2

Note: A clipPath is actually an SVG vector element, so it's technically not correct to say it isn't vector. Unfortunately, you can't expand something that has been clipped to pure outlines, and essentially have the clipping path cut out the pattern. You'll need to use a different technique. To achieve what you want, you could do the following: Create a ...


2

I found a way. Select Circle + Text and then click on Path->Difference


2

In Inkscape ungroup the graphic Select both the M and black square Click Path > Difference Now the M is cut out from the black, leaving a hole. You can check this by going into the Document Properties and enable the Checkerboard Background which will display the transparency grid.


2

This is just a suggestion: I'd use a single document, with separate layers for text in different languages. So you have only one drawing, and when you export your drawing, you make visible only one of the text layers at a time.


2

Make sure the circles are aligned either vertically or horizontally, then draw a rectangle between them, ensuring that the size matches and that it ends at the centers of both circles. Then merge with the pathfinder tool and rotate/recolor as needed.


2

The case is already solved with a tangent drawing extension. Actually in this special case the tangents can be drawn also without that extension. They are as long as the line between the circle midpoints and they can be made by duplicating that connection line. Placing them properly with snapping happens when one draws a 90 degrees rotated copy of the line. ...


1

If you've imported a shape to Inkscape, it may already be a path. Press F2 or select the node editor tool. When you click on your shape, it should show the nodes which define the shape. If you've imported an image, ignore the above and see the following: Your need to convert the image to a path implies that you have a bitmap, rather than a vector. Select ...


1

Adjusting the flood dimensions and co-ordinates works for me. Make sure you have the object selected first before trying to edit the flood. However, when applying an inner drop shadow you could skip these flood adjustment steps entirely by converting the stroke to outlines first. Select the object and do Path > Stroke to Path. Now apply the filter. Note: ...


1

I found a useful tutorial video directly addressing your goal. Youtube Text on Path video Considering that you've made it this far, the answer boils down to selecting the circle and using the horizontal mirror feature to flip the circle. The video covers a few other features of text on path that makes the entire video worth viewing for Inkscape beginners....


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