11

Here's one approach, there may be others. Draw two straight lines, select them both, then create a bunch of lines in between using Extensions > Generate from Path > Interpolate, ungroup them, then do Path > Combine Draw the curve Copy the curved path (you'll need this later) Select All Ctrl+A, then do Path > Cut Path or ctrl+Alt+/ Select and Delete the ...


3

You can do this using the XML editor Shift+Ctrl+X Select the object, and in the XML editor, set the inkscape:transform-center for both x and y to 0. Example


2

I was able to reasonably duplicate your image, without fill as that aspect is inconsequential. After creating the circle with a "stock" dashed configuration, I rotated it to ensure that the longer dash also rotated, to approximately 4:32 position. This image below is from the XML editor: As you can see, well, you could if you click on the image, there is a ...


2

If the embedded image is a raster image then you can't. Fill and stroke attributes can only be applied to vector objects. A possible workaround is to apply an outline filter to the raster images. Select all the raster images (holding down Shift as you click each image will allow you to make a multiple selection) Do Filters > Morphology > Outline - adjust ...


2

Go to menu Object → Transform (or hit Shift + Ctrl + M by default) and make sure you have Apply to each object separately option enabled – see the picture:


2

There's no special term, although you could just call it an outline, and there are several techniques that could be used. A semi-automated method is to make a copy of the design, make sure everything is ungrouped until there are no groups left, and do Path > Union or use the shortcut Ctrl++ Then do Path > Dynamic Offset or use the shortcut Ctrl+J, and ...


2

Another, possibly quite precise option, using the measurement tool: https://youtu.be/lcYv5dLTScU


2

If you mean the Paint Bucket tool, then from the main menu select Edit > Preferences > Tools > Paint Bucket Check the option "This tools own style". This will set a default style for that tool only. You can use the currently selected object to set it to whatever you want. The tool will then always use that style. Every time you use it however, you will ...


2

Yes. Select the text box with the Select and Transform tool F1 Open the XML editor using Shift+Ctrl+X In the right pane of the XML editor, select the "Transform" item in the list. In the settings box at the bottom right of the XML editor there will be a value that says "scale(xxx,xxx)". Delete everything in that box and click Set Example showing what to ...


1

If you're using the same marker for all your objects, you do not have to recreate it, only select it from the list in the 'Stroke' tab of the Fill&Stroke dialog. If you want to get rid of unused and unneeded marker definitions, do File > Clean up document. All those that are used will stay in the list.


1

Two more options: Pattern: Select the image, do Object > Pattern > Convert to pattern, and apply the stroke afterwards. The object will now be filled with a repeating pattern, but as long as you don't change the object's size or move the pattern handles, you won't see that. Additional Rectangle: Select the image, copy it to the clipboard. Draw an ...


1

create orthogonal reference line of approximate desired length (hold control while creating line) and adjust as needed in appropriate width field. note: size in mm equals one-half inch change color and increase width of stroke for ease of use reduce opacity for same reason place new line on separate layer for ease of destruction drag horizontal and ...


1

It is necessary to select the nodes of the individual lobes and use the join selected node button in order to get a complete fill. Use F2 to enter node editing, click on one path, shift click on second path adjoining, then draw a bounding box over the common nodes. Using the join selected node button will create a single node where there was previously two. ...


1

I realize this is an old question, but worth a revisit I think. You can find the vanishing points in an image by extrapolating lines of perspective within it. You can draw simple lines in Inkscape and turn them into guides by hitting Shift+G. This example image has two vanishing points:


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible