New answers tagged

0

I'm aware this is a really old question, however I think I know what caused the problem. When the path was created, a Shape must have been applied in the tool controls such as "Triangle in". This is a path effect, and it will mess up the clip. Remove the path effect before applying the clip. Path effects can be removed using Path > Remove Path ...


1

Looks like the x might not editable text, for example text which has been converted to outlines will no longer be editable as text. You can tell by clicking and dragging on the text with the text tool. Should look like this if it's editable text, it will be highlighted. You can also tell by simply selecting the text box using the Select Tool (S), and check ...


3

Looks like someone has written about a concept for a tool. It doesn't exist in Inkscape yet. It looks a bit like the Shape Builder tool in Illustrator. You can already do something kind of similar in Inkscape using the existing boolean operations. I'll use one of the examples in your link. Draw the circles with a stroke and no fill, and make sure they ...


3

The page that you've linked seems to be just someone's concept for such a tool and is not actually implemented in Inkscape. Something like that is in development, however. In the meantime, you'll have to use boolean operations that you can find under the 'Path' menu, or use the 'Boolean operation' path-effect.


2

Another method: Draw a vertical line. Set your angle snap to some divisor of 60° if it isn't already (Preferences → Behavior → Steps). Duplicate it, rotate it 60° (hold ctrl to snap to steps). Move it so its endpoint aligns with that of the previous line. Continue as in Billy Kerr's answer. This might be more generally useful, since it will also help if ...


0

I would solve it this way: draw a straight line to connect the curve with your x-axis (press F6 and keep Ctrl pressed to ensure the line is straight) use the fill bounded areas tool (paintbucket icon, the U hotkey) by clicking anywhere on the enclosed area formed by the curve, the axis, and the line you just drew


1

Try this. Select the red circle in the flag and do Path > Object to Path. Then save the SVG again. Might also be better to choose "Plain SVG" as the format when saving to remove the Inkscape specific XML. I tested this solution, and viewed the results in Chrome, Firefox and Edge. All working fine. As to why this happened, that's harder to ...


9

Billy Kerr's answer is the canonical way to draw regular hexagons (and beautifully illustrated, I might add), but I would propose an alternative for your specific situation: a hexagonal grid. In Document Properties, select the Grids tab. Choose Axonometric Grid and press New. Change the grid spacing as desired, but leave the angles as they are (30°). Ensure ...


25

Draw a 6-sided polygon (a hexagon) with the Star and Polygon tool. Hold down Ctrl as you click and drag to constrain the angle. Do Path > Object to Path to convert to paths. Using the Select by Nodes tool, select all the nodes, then hit the Break Path at Selected Nodes button. Do Path > Break apart. This will release all the paths to individual ...


0

The problem comes because you have to be careful when copying the last circle you put. If you go create circles with the space bar and after having created the last one you release the left button of the mouse, which is with which you dragged the circle used to copy, it will put two circles at that point: the one you created when pressing the space bar and ...


0

Using the ofn-path-edit script, several ways: #1: Make a selection (Freehand, rectangle...) around the characters you want to delete (or keep) and use the Delete Stroke/Extract strokes function. #2: Use the Break text path apart function, that will create a new path per character (or diacritic mark). Keep the one you need.


0

If the text is all one combined path, you can delete nodes using the Paths Tool by holding down Ctrl+Shift+click to delete them. Continue deleting until the letter is completely gone. You can also delete line segments using the same method by doing this on a line rather than a node, but the nodes will be left behind. If the paths for each letter are separate,...


2

After checking the SVG, the construction is a bit of a mess TBH. It contains both raster and vector elements with the raster images contained within clipping paths. These seem to be creating conflation artefacts around the clipped raster images, i.e. where the solid areas meet the transparency. It's a bit weird though to be honest. I wouldn't have expected ...


1

Try this: In Inkscape open the SVG, and then do File > Save As, then set the file type to "Optimized SVG". This can be used to remove all of the Inkscape specific XML which if left will probably just confuse Illustrator. Remember to give the file a new name if you don't want to overwrite the original. Set up the options like this: When you open ...


0

I do believe you can achieve this via the command line with the use of Inkscape's actions and verbs. The official documentation on this is a little sparse but I found this page which has more info https://how-to.fandom.com/wiki/How_to_use_Inkscape_in_commandline_mode. If you click on the verb list you can see there's a DeleteLayer verb. You would need to use ...


0

Have you tried making a curve that follows the unbend target, mirroring that curve horizontally, then applying that as a bend operation as in the link?


3

Imagine the black lines should be cut along the edge which is now the red rectangle and the parts outside the edge should simply vanish without causing anything else (= no new lines, no hidden parts, nothing vanishes splits nor moves inside the edge). Unfortunately original colors will be lost if there's more than one. The first steps are the same as ...


2

Assuming the hexagons are all separate objects, select all of them and do Path > Combine. This will make a combined/compound path. Essentially, this will turn them all into one path (i.e. one object). If the hexagons are already a combined path, skip this step. Enable snapping to the page boundary, and snapping to cusp nodes, then draw a rectangle same ...


0

The core curve of the spiro path is the Euler spiral. Although the implementation's math may be flawless, I personally believe the input method may be suboptimal: The handles are ignored.


-2

My tip is to look for large high resolution images like those used by big restaurants like Mcdonalds menu, you will find them in free or paid image banks like Shutterstock and other vendors. This will avoid pixelation when you use them in your PDF, always use larger images than you need so when you format them to smaller sizes they will look sharper and more ...


1

Your image is 450x747 and you use 300dpi, so you have pixels enough to fill 1,5inch x 2,49inch which is obviously not the case with your PDF. Screen dpi is usually around 72, so you can try importing the images with 72dpi. If you have a hi-res version, then you can set higher dpi.


1

Use the object window and select it. Object->objects. It's the most underrated and unseen feature in inkscape. This should be visible per default.


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