28

If you want to recreate the image using Photoshop, you could do something like the following (please excuse my very quick and poor example!). Create a rectangle Use Transform > Skew to transform the rectangle in a way that imitates the desired perspective Duplicate the layer and place it behind the original one, complete the corners by drawing more ...


19

You would have to do each side manually (especially if trying to make it follow the grid). What you do is, use the Direct Selection Tool (A) and select all the points that would have to move in that specific direction and then move just those points (it's a bit hard to explain, so I've included a screen capture) You see how I selected all the anchor points ...


18

Here is an overview on how I would do it with Inkscape, which should be easily translatable to Illustrator (if not, Inkscape is free). I won’t go into the details, as it is not your desired program. Create something like this: The rectangles on the left are squares with a border length corresponding to the border length of your cube. Group the top square ...


14

Many designers have already created PSD files using Smart Objects that you can use to accomplish this "isometric 3D" style (thanks to Tom here). All you need to do is replace/add your image or design to the Smart Object layer and that's it. Here's how. 1. Download a PSD File To Use As A Starting Point There are plenty out there, here's a list of the ...


11

I won't directly answer the question, I will, instead suggest an alternate workflow. The benefit of this workflow is that it is guaranteed that you will not get this problem. First build a isometric grid. Make vertical lines and rotate the field 2 times with 120 degree offset. Tip: If you make the lines uncolored then you can just directly color the image. ...


11

For twigital the designer(Chris) used Illustrator, a grid and the 3D Rotate tool. Notice it has presets for isometric rotations. If you need more than what Illustrator provides by default, try the CADtools plugin for Illustrator, which provides tools for isometric drawing and dimensioning. I've got a few more resources to share. Based on this tutorial I'...


11

Drawing shadows Doing accurate shadows is quite easy, albeit a bit tedious. All you need is to do is to systematically find intersections of lines. Not all that different from drawing (or constructing) the original orthographic or perspective images in the first place. Before we begin lets define two different shadow models: Directional lights, are light ...


10

You can do this in Photoshop CS 5 (Extended) but somewhat painfully. However, if you have Photoshop CS 6 Extended it is now even easier to do this with Photoshop's updated 3D tools and user experience. Additionally, as it is in true 3D space all of the perspective is controlled by a virtual camera, which you can adjust like Field of View and Depth of Field. ...


9

Two relevant terms: The type of flat-3D perspective is isometric view (or more accurately pseudo-isometric because it looks like it's not strictly based on 120 degrees). The style of limited-detail but accurate drawing is like instructional diagrams - in particular, it looks based on styles commonly used in in-flight safety diagrams. A lot of the incidental ...


9

Ok, here is how you do this. Prepare your image layers and all. Im going to be using a very simple image with colored squares. Image 1: Original setup with simple shapes, this would work with any layered source however. Select ALL your layers you intend to stack up, into isometric or perspective. I will be transforming to isometric [1]. Scale down ...


9

Draw a rounded rectangle on the grid. Select the rectangle. Set up the Skew Transform in the Transform panel, with the horizontal scew set to -60, and the vertical set to -30. Apply the transform. Reposition the shape to snap to the grid. Note: after the transform, the height of the rectangle appears to double as it becomes stretched. So if you create your ...


8

We can approach this problem in many ways. Using a plotting app First approach is to get hold of the original data and turn the rotation to isometric, i would use this approach. The original image is probably done in matlab (and I prefer not deal with it). But I prefer Mathematica as it makes better graphs in my oppinion, and is in this case nicer overall....


7

I would recommend using the Illustrator perspective grid because it allows you to easily maintain and edit things on a plane. Here's a very quick example I put together: I recently answered a question dealing with the perspective grid that also included some further reading links at the bottoms. It's a great tool to read up on if you're serious about doing ...


7

My way to align/join etc multiple points is as follows: Press "A" and choose the points in question - Now, right click and choose Average->Both: + The result: gif:


7

You can transform a object from normal view into isometric in the transform palette with the matrix operation in one go. The benefit of this approach is that you can undo it later, to make edits to your object and transform it back. What you do is: expand the transom palette shift+ctrl+M Go to the matrix subtab and Enable edit current matrix Type in the ...


5

3D Extrude & Bevel → Map Art You can achieve this with the Map Art feature of 3D Extrude & Bevel. You can only map artwork that has been created as a symbol. This gives you the advantage of being able to create your symbols, map them to your 3D object then update your symbols and automatically update your 3D object. Create your symbols You need to ...


5

What i usually do when I'm faced with a problem I can't seem to solve is try to find some example pictures. In your case, the circle will become more of an ellipse. You could start by 'dumbing it down' to a square, and then see what that gives you. Here are some examples:


5

If you're looking for something internal, why not use Smart Guides and adjust the Preferences to show Construction Guides at 30° angles? This will give you a "snap" at the 30° angles. While not the same as constraining, I often find the smart Guides snapping sufficient. The only thing perhaps easier than adjusting preferences is using the Protractor Panel ...


5

In Illustrator, use the Effect > 3D > Extrude & Bevel option Create a square Effect > 3D > Extrude & Bevel Object > Expand Appearance Now you have an easily editable cube. Add inner strokes, to achieve that look


5

In essence drawing in isometric is the same as drawing in 2D. With the exception that you need to move each time in 3 directions instead of 2. This means that you need to artificially move in one direction more than your used to. Books could be written about this. Isometric drawing is usually introduced by drawing on a grid. This is because it is ...


5

Move it vertically down holding Shift + Alt to duplicate Send it back Reduce the opacity Add a Transparency Mask with a rectangle filled with a gradient from black at the bottom to white at the top


4

A good method for creating this sort of 3d perspective rim is as follows: Using the perspective tool put the object into the correct perspective (or leave it in position for a different effect). Copy the layer and use the original (make sure the layer is below the copy) and nudge it with the down arrow key until it is as low as you want the rim to be deep....


4

One option is to use Illustrator's 3D Extrude & Bevel. Start with a flat circle and go to Effect → 3D → Extrude & Bevel... There are isometric presets already available. Another option is to use an isometric grid. There is a nice tutorial on creating an isometric grid in Illustrator here: How to Create an Isometric Grid in Less than 2 Minutes!. ...


4

Select the text, then go to Effect->3D->Rotate. Then choose the Isometric Top option: For an alternative orientation you can change the parameters like so:


4

There's no real need to enter the 3D domain for this kind of illustration. In Illustrator, select your text that you want to put on the bottle and go to Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Warp... and select the Arch option. Tweak the Bend amount (with Preview checked) to get the right amount of curve to fit the bottle label. If it's not perfect then ...


4

You obviously drew a rounded rectangle, applied -30 degrees vertical skew and then it didn't fit. The clou is to have right dimensions before skewing: The black rectangle has width = 3 grid horizontal diagonals. For testing other things in the same image there's also equally wide red rectangle with sharp corners. Those other things: removing the rounding ...


4

You have to follow each face directions. You mark them first and create the fill with shades of gray color. See the image below:


3

Preface I would like to offer an alternate solution. The SSR method used by @CAI is perfectly valid transformation technique that has uses beyond grids. SSR is actually setting a orthographic matrix in place the hard way because theres no way to set it directly (do save the scale sequence as an action it is super useful). While its one of the things you ...


3

Use the Rectangular Grid Tool to create a uniform grid. Object → Transform → Scale, check Non-Uniform and set Vertical scale to 86,602% Object → Transform → Shear at 30 degrees Object → Transform → Rotate at -30 degrees View → Guides → Make Guides


3

Well you could use this jsx script: var Prefs = app.preferences; var angle = Prefs.getRealPreference('constrain/angle'); angle += 30.0; if (angle >70) angle = 0; Prefs.setRealPreference('constrain/angle', angle); You can tie this into a action, and keyboard shortcut from there. But then illustrator will forget this next time you load (yeah adobe ...


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