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55

You can't save transparency to a .jpg. The file format simply doesn't support it. Anything that is transparent will become white when saved to a .jpeg. Try .png or .gif, those file formats do accept transparency.


35

Because they are way better at compressing pictures that have lots of colours and irregular shapes, like photographs. Have you tried the same epxeriment you did, but then with a photograph? The .png is most probably going to be noticeably bigger than any .jpg, regardless of the .jpg's compression factor. Example: .png picture, 110k .jpg at 100% quality, ...


25

In short, Facebook is converting your image to the JPEG/JPG format (Join Photographic Experts Group). There seems to be no current way to upload images to use as a profile picture or to your photo album which Facebook will not convert to JPEG. ...a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital photography (image). The degree of compression can ...


22

Any time a format isn't available in the Save As dialog, it means that format is invalid for the document in the state it's in. There's no such thing (as Lese and cwedge point out), as a 32-bit (or 16-bit) jpeg, nor a duotone, Lab or 1-bit bitmap jpeg. Photoshop versions prior to CS5 would simply not show jpeg as an available option for 16-bit images, which ...


17

This in not blurriness, but the JPEG compression doing its thing. Strong colour contrasts between irregular shapes are always distorted like this by the compression in a .jpg. We call them 'artefacts'. You could try to reduce the amount of JPEG compression. Increase the 'quality' slider when you export / save as a .jpg and the results should be better. The ...


13

JPEG has backing from the photographic industry and predates PNG by a half-dozen years or so, while PNG was designed as a replacement for GIF, which was rather zealously protected by CompuServe. People were sued for using GIFs on their websites, for example, simply because they didn't use a program that was licensed by CompuServe to make those images. From ...


12

In the Export dialog box, tick the 'Use Artboards' option. This saves the image including the containing artboard, what you're seeing as the white frame behind your logo. If you need to re-adjust the white area (the artboard), hit Shift+O and drag the square handles which will appear at the edge of each side or at the corners.


11

Although the question was asked about Adobe Photoshop, the behavior is due to the lossy JPEG format and would be similar with any image editor. Cropping a JPEG can make it less compressible, especially when the x and y offsets of the cropped area are odd numbers. This causes a re-subsampling of the color channels that can make the cropped image more complex ...


11

No. A JPG is a raster image with no concept of layers or history or anything of the kind that would let you revert it to a previous state or remove anything leaving what was underneath intact. The only solution is to find the original file (version history in Dropbox or Google Drive comes to mind) or some other non-graphic-related technical solution.


10

Here is an article on exactly your problem. Been having this problem as well. Hope this helps! Facebook uses a low quality jpg compression so any solid colors end up looking heavily pixelated. Solution is to add images at double the size with noise.


9

Why low quality JPG saved as high quality in Photoshop increases the file size? If you have a low quality JPEG which you open and re–save with 100% quality (or 0% compression) in any image editing software, the output will be bigger in size than the source. In order to understand this, it is good to take a crash course on JPEG. JPEG compression isn't ...


9

Having the same problem with a white text on a solid red background. My solution was to replace the solid red by a gradient of to reds. Afterwards I also added a Noise filter (or grain filter (7) in the filter gallery) in Photoshop. The improvement was very noticeable and the result was perfect. In attachment you can see the original and the finished result.


8

When saving images as .jpeg you always lose information. The dialog basically asks you how much information you would like to lose in favor of smaller size on disk (1 = most loss, 100 = least loss). There is no way to tell what you originally selected and the only use would be to have a history of your workflow because this loss is irrecoverably applied to ...


8

Lossless cropping of a JPEG image is possible using the "jpegtran" application that comes with libjpeg; see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libjpeg. Quoting from "man jpegtran" on a system where jpegtran is installed: .. lossless crop is restricted by the current JPEG format: the upper left corner of the selected region must fall on an iMCU [8 or 16] ...


8

The bad news: With automatic tracing algorithms alone, you won't be able to get a clean result. There will always be noise. The good news: If you're willing to invest just a bit of effort in manual cleanup, you can get a very decent vectorized reconstruction. This is what I was able to get in roughly 5 minutes: (Click on the image for a high-res version or ...


8

Manly is correct that the file is linked, as it should be, and you can simply uncheck "linked" in the dialog when placing an image. If you drag and drop an image directly in to your document (which will create a linked image) or have an existing linked image (It will tell you if an image is linked at the very left of the control panel when the image is ...


7

This is an outdated piece of advice related to using images in older layout programs that were not Photoshop-aware. It has no relevance to Save for Web. A jpeg is a flat file, and Photoshop takes care of the flattening (and conversion to sRGB for web use) automatically. In general, practice non-destructive editing: never flatten a PSD, never change original ...


7

When an image is saved in Photoshop as .jpeg, .png, .tiff, etc. The file will also save the ruler (better known as "guides") information within it. I think Photoshop saves that info in a small portion of the file called metadata if I remember correctly.


7

My first, second and third answers to this question would be "Find a different printer, because the one you have is incompetent." There is no grande format equipment made that requires jpeg as input. Typical spec, this one from the Fuji website: Formats All popular desktop formats including PostScript 3, EPS, TIFF, PDF, both RGB and CMYK color spaces....


7

There is no simple answer - each compression event dumps some data, it tends to dump less with subsequent saves as most of the disposable data has already been disposed of. Factors include the compression level, the size of the image, it's content, your personal threshold of "noticeable" and the quality of your monitor.


7

I've seen a video featuring this. I'm not sure what it was anymore, but check out these 3 videos (from YouTube and Vimeo): (The images aren't hyperlinked. Instead, there are linked texts at the bottom of each.) 1-Jpeg degradation by Connecticut State Library 2-JPG artifact test 1000 saves by Martin Flucka 3-Generation Loss by hadto This last one by hadto ...


7

Something not mentioned in great detail is the way these compression algorithms work. JPEG is targeted directly at photographs where slight changes in pixel color are not noticed. PNG is targeted more for fabricated images that contain large areas of a single color where is compression is taken full advantage of like in your example of a huge all white photo ...


6

From Facebook's help center: How can I make sure that my photos display in the highest possible quality? To avoid compression when you upload your cover photo, make sure the file size is under 100 KB.


6

What you're observing is not a clipping mask, per se. Jpeg has no transparency and no concept of clipping or masking. Jpeg does have several metadata sections, and many programs will happily store extra information in there. Photoshop stores paths, as you've noticed, and guides. To replicate this, create a new file and add some paths and guides. Then "...


6

Yes! You can do this from command line (using the Terminal app) with ImageMagick. After you install ImageMagick, navigate to the directory where your picture is located and run the following command: identify -verbose yourimage.jpg | grep -i quality Where yourimage.jpg is the name of the image. And you should get the value which indicates the image ...


6

If you really are sensitive to the quality then you should avoid jpeg. You allready lost quality when the original image was saved as jpeg, nothing brings this quality back. In general you should avoid saving your documents out to jpeg unless your shipping the images off somewhere in their final form. Its hard to say wether the quality suffers much at all, ...


6

I would resave the TIFF file with LZW compression turned on. That should get the size down considerably. Edit: If you are using Photoshop, you would simply "Save As", choose .TIF as your format and location. After that you should get a dialog box (see below) with compression options.


6

jPeg images save automatically with a flat solid background. You will be able to achieve saving your image with a transparent background to .png format. It won't work with JPEG format. Some reference to assist transparent background


6

No, you cannot prevent someone from distorting an image because transforming the image is done by the program. You can only tell them not to distort the logo by sending the companies branding guideline or tell them how they can scale/move the logo without distorting the logo.


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