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2

Because in 2.10 you can work in "Perceptual" or "Linear" light, and the standard 2.10 layer blend modes are "Linear" and do not give the same results as the 2.8 ones. You can use the 2.8 "perceptual" blend modes (aka "Legacy" modes) using the switch on the right of the blend mode selector:


0

I'm not sure what you're using to do the drawing, your package might be more or less sensitive to contrast, though basically I think its contrast detection is too harsh. This was a quick go using Photoshop & Studio Artist... First, use 'Select Subject' to roughly isolate the main target. I didn't worry about accuracy, i don't think it was necessary. I ...


3

I think the main problem with your example is the lack of contrast between the background and subject. Here's one method which could be used to make the subject pop more, like an illustration. Duplicate the layer, then create layer masks to separate the fox from the background. Perhaps something like this shown below. Here I masked out the fox, using the ...


1

Take the pen (=a Photoshop tool) to your better hand and draw a clipping path. It's a hefty job for one who hasn't practiced it. With the path make a selection and copy the foreground to the top layer. The bottom layer can be the whole image. Let the top layer get filtering (see NOTE1) which leaves rich details. Let the bottom layer get filtering which ...


5

The path->difference operation could help: to use this the yellow A needs to be a path rather than a letter. If this is not the case, convert the letter into a path. Same for the stripes. If they are strokes rather than paths, convert them. select both the yellow letter and a white bar (red in my picture) and choose the path->difference menue the ...


1

The correct blending mode would be Difference. This blending mode does not only mark you which pixels are different but at what extent. It the difference is very subtle, you can not see it, you need to adjust the resulting image to see the pixels. On this webpage, I used the blending mode to analyze the difference between a base image and the artifacts ...


6

Create a shape layer in the desired shape and with any colour fill; Add your drop shadow using Layer Styles; Make sure that on the Drop Shadow settings, the box 'Layer Knocks Out Drop Shadow' is ticked; In the Layers palette, reduce the layer's 'Fill' property (not Opacity) to 0%. 'Fill' functions exactly the same as Opacity, except it doesn't affect any ...


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