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30

Ethically and morally..... using any "contest" is merely taking advantage of designers. Contest do nothing but take advantage of designers and give all the benefit to the person running the contest. It essentially amounts to "slave labor" of a sort. All designers should adamantly avoid "contest" settings. However, if a designer freely agrees to being taken ...


11

No, it is not right. Use what you paid for and make sure all the other contestants you are taking inspiration from are compensated. These authors own their work unless/until you buy it. If you can only afford one winning proposal, then that's what you should be using.


10

I realized that it is OK to take inspiration from others work, but what I have done is illegal and immoral because I used lots of design ideas from other contestants. The correct way is to ask for permission from those creators, and pay them the mutually-agreed-upon price if they give permission. But, I didn't have financial means to pay them. So, I was ...


6

Redrawing something means you have created derivative work, not original work. (PDF from copyright.gov) Merely "redrawing" something does not, in most instances, grant you an unencumbered copyright. In addition, there is no such thing as "change it by x amount and it's okay". If the original image can be discerned from the copy in any way, it maybe ...


2

I don't think it is that similar to Beats logo, it is however, a bit similar to Publix logo: Especially because of the colors On another note, that curve under the p doesn't seem to fit.It doesn't look like a natural curve (notice how it indents and then curves). In the Publix and Beats logo, they don't even have a curve at all.


2

Just to add to what's been posted. This is why it's very important to have a contract and to communicate through email. Emails can be tracked back. Including a link to a DropBox for file download of a rendered PDF will not work. When doing logo design the options should be included in the email and I'd advise creating an email template similar to how ...


2

I'm not a lawyer or barrister, and I don't play one on TV; hence any advice I dispense is not legal advice, and is somewhere between suspect, apocryphal and commonsense: take nothing at face value and do your own research in your locale. I am a multi-decade graphic designer and illustrator, and as a result I've been round the roundabout on IP issues - this ...


2

Yes. It is a "registered symbol". However.... The Bluetooth symbol is specifically designed to be included on product packaging and marketing materials in order to indicate to the consumer that the item is "Bluetooth aware" or capable. With this in mind, of course you can use the symbol on packaging for your product. Merely ensure you stick to the usage ...


1

No. In slightly more detail: Ideas aren't copyrightable. But their expression is. If it's just an idea, well, you can use it. But the closer in expression your implementation is to what they've shown you in their entries, the more likely it is to be legally protected. And if their designs are legally protected, which seems likely, then unless the ...


1

Generally one doesn't "revise" a work-for-hire agreement. You either agree to a work-for-hire arrangement or you don't. There's really no grey area. By nature, any work-for-hire agreement will grant one party (the client) all rights to everything which is created. You don't "modify" that. You simply refuse to agree to it. In most cases a work-for-hire ...


1

As far as I know they are copyrighted. The Pac-Man video game source and object code were registered with the U.S. Copyright Office by Commonwealth Toy and Novelty Company, Inc. and Bally Midway Manufacturing Company in 1982, as was, in a separate registration, all derivative works based on Pac-Man. If you wish you can visit the Law.stackexchange for more ...


1

Let it go. This is what happens when you do favours. No contract, no real issue.


1

(Disclaimer: I am not a laywer.) If you don't have a contract, then you're SOL. You gave away your intellectual property without any restrictions on its usage. You did own the copyright until you handed it over to the other person. You deliberately made the artwork to be used as corporate identification, not just a one-off T-shirt or poster, so your ...


1

Employment is a work-for-hire agreement. Legally, your employer is paying for licenses, that does not grant you permission to use those licenses outside the scope of your employment. Everything you have (and create) at your office is your employer's not yours. That include software and/or software subscriptions. Unless there's some written agreement in place ...


1

No. Just ask Shepard Fairey Photos are copyrighted. Using a photo as a basis for new work is derivative work and an infringement on existing copyrights. There's no such thing as "edit an image by x amount and it's okay". If any part is recognizably the same compared to the original, in may be considered infringement. Be aware, just because others may ...


1

ISO has published general licensing conditions for their publications. The "Don't re-use" -icon is a part of one publication. ISO has the copyright of all their publications. Buying a publication gives to you the right to use it. They say that you get the right to use an icon to obey a standard, but you cannot give nor sell icons otherwise. I believe that ...


1

Yes. You should be worried about copyrights and licensing. Royalty-free stock imagery is typically set to strictly forbid use in a logo. Shutterstock specifically states that logo usage is not permissible on their site - unless you purchase the rights to the image which can cost considerably more than typical royalty-free costs. You will find this rather ...


1

18 U.S. Code Section 713(a) in summary says that displaying a reproduction or likeness of the Great Seal of the U.S. or the seals of the President, Vice-President, Senate, House of Representations or Congress is a federal crime if you convey a "false impression of sponsorship or approval" by the Government of the U.S. or any of its departments, agencies or ...


1

Disclaimer: My answer below does not constitute legal advice, since I am not a lawyer. If you want legal advice, hire a lawyer. In most cases, actual people themselves cannot be copyrighted. There are some exceptions such as fictional/literary characters. In most cases, it's only images of people which are copyrightable works. Copyright also covers the ...


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