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4

Sorry I didn't see this sooner. I am an intellectual property attorney, and my practice focuses entirely on copyright and trademark issues. Since I am an attorney and you are not my client, I am unable to provide legal advice to you. However, I will comment that the above answers, while thoughtful and well-intentioned, are not accurate statements, at least ...


3

Freepik employs different licenses. Sometimes you need to pay to use, even when attributing explicitly! The only way to be sure is to look at the license. If this is unclear, you need to contact Freepik.


2

Unfortunately, you could be on the hook. Laws vary from country to country about how remedies to creative theft can be made (lawsuit, independently adjudicated, etc.), but most of the world abides by certain standards for fair use and creative rights through the Berne Convention and other treaties. If you are really interested, a short article with good ...


2

What you describe is a normal use as part of a desktop font license. So you would double-check what is allowed in the desktop EULA of that specific font, then buy the license and you can go ahead and sell your posters.


1

First, I am not a lawyer, so this is NOT legal advice, just a suggestion for what to look into. It would depend on how the "Personal" and "Commercial" is defined. Sometimes, the difference is whether or not you are making a profit off what you are producing. Sometimes it's using it in ANY type of business or professional purpose is ...


1

There are many other 3-striped logos out there — I don't see an immediate connection between your logo and the other one. Also quite far from Adidas and Tesla aswell. Now, if they are prepared to take legal action, our opinions here are more or less pointless, and you will ultimately need legal advice. Honestly you may consider changing your logo under the ...


1

Don't sell unaltered copies of an image. e.g. sell an exact copy of a stock photo as a poster, print or on a physical product. You can sell posters where you use a stock photo, as long as the poster is not just the photo (aka reselling the image). You cannot just frame it and sell it, nor print a mug and sell it, unless the stock photo is edited somehow. ...


1

"Copyright" depends greatly on where a company is based and laws in any particular region. Whether or not something can be copyrighted depends greatly upon where the copyright is being filed. In the US, generally you can copyright how something is presented or displayed. However, simply because something is copyrighted in the US, that does not mean any other ...


1

You can not patent graphic design generally. What you get instead is copyright. While i would like to say that copyright and patent right are mutually exclusive that's not entirely true, though it is broadly speaking true. There is also a middle ground in some jurisdictions that is a "design patent", which has different names in different countries. This ...


1

You can probably* use all of the fonts that were pre-installed on your PC/Mac for any purpose - commercial or otherwise. These pre-installed fonts are licensed by Microsoft/Apple for use on computers for any purpose. However, fonts are certainly copyrightable, but that means you can't redistribute the font files in most cases. It doesn't mean you can't use ...


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