26

It's absolutely necessary to attribute any third party graphics that your site utilizes as specified by the license agreement. Just because there might be other sites out there not properly attributing artwork doesn't make it okay at all. If the icon is so "basic" or "minor" that you think it's silly to give attribution, then consider just creating the ...


16

No. You should have written in your contract that client has all rights to materials he gives to you. With your invoice you should give him list (names) of files you bought to use for the project and the ones he gave you. Sometimes I print dummy layout with signature so I will know which file is which. I keep them for anyone trying to ask for license or ...


13

I would always search the site for any attribution requirements or guidelines. In the absence of that, the The Noun Project has some clear and concise instructions for different forms of media that can be reliably used as a guideline: How to Attribute This Icon Digital Attribution Websites - Include the attribution either on the page where ...


13

I, personally, don't concern myself immediately with client provided assets. As @Szczerzo answered, the contract should state that you are not responsible for rights to client-provided resources as well as a clause stating the client is responsible for any and all legal fees or damages resulting from their supply of unlicensed assets. And there should be a ...


12

There is one thing that a user of the work cannot do, and that is to claim copyright on the original work. One of two things happens (legally) with CC0: either the work is released into the public domain (if local copyright law permits that); or the author of the work retains full copyright, but the work is licensed for any and all uses. Effectively (though ...


11

Yes, a vectorized image generally counts as a derivative of the original, which means that distributing it without the original copyright holder's permission would be a copyright violation. Of course, if you just want to make a nice poster to hang on your own wall, then you're probably safe — doing so may or may not be legal, depending on your local ...


10

Whatever you decide, WRITE UP A CONTRACT. You must both sign it before you begin work. The contract should contain your requirements for licensing and state that you own the copyright otherwise. You can probably find some good language as a starting point from AIGA: http://www.aiga.org Do not in any way proceed without a contract. Even if your contract is ...


10

You can put tutorial work in your portfolio provided you explain that it is tutorial work. Alas, I don't know if that would gain you much in an interview. The fact that you can finish a tutorial doesn't necessarily translate into design and problem solving skills which is what the person looking at your portfolio wants to see.


10

Whether or not you own the book is irrelevant. Purchasing a book does not give you any rights to reproduce any part of it. You can’t use the images (or text) from the book without express prior written permission. This would need to be requested from whoever owns the copyright. This will be stated somewhere in the book. Giving credit is not enough. If ...


9

For a business card, my recommendation would be Use a URL-shortening service to create a short url for the webpage that is hosting the original graphic with full attribution. Use small print on the card to give the short url with the credit. Example: If you have room, you might want to include the creator's name as well as the link. You also might want ...


8

I haven't read about anyone being sued for vectorizing, but I have read about someone being sued for pixelating. After seven months of legal wrangling, we reached a settlement. Last September, I paid Maisel a sum of $32,500 and I'm unable to use the artwork again. Pixelating is removing detail whereas vectorizing would be adding detail (if you do it ...


8

Until recently it was possible to buy the Adobe CS6 pack permanently as a one-time payment. But that is no longer an option and Adobe CC software is currently only available via subscriptions. Yeah, like going to the gym :) There is a free 7-day trial where you download, install and use the software for 7 days and then it becomes locked until a payment is ...


7

In every question about licensing terms, the correct procedure is to contact the rights-holder of the font or typeface. The actual owner of the typeface, and licensing, is the only one who with the authority to answer your questions about license terms. If you for some reason cannot contact or get a response from the owner of the rights in question, your ...


7

I'm not a lawyer, but there are a few things here that any designer who's worked with CC material can clear up. does this mean that the shirt cannot be sold? Not at all. Plenty of people sell physical goods containing open-licensed intellectual property (e.g. open source software on a disc for convenience or installed as a service, books that are out of ...


7

No one can claim to be the original author on a public domain work. That is considered Copyfraud. Assingning a different license to a public domain work and redistributing it is possible. But that does not change the original public domain dedication. So there will be no way of enforcing those restrictions ;)


7

There are three issues here: The easy one. Do you have permission or a license from the artist? Or did they artist release their work under something like Creative Commons? If no, you're stealing their work, don't do it. If yes, move on to... The medium difficulty question. Can a person's likeness be used like this? Leaving aside who it is for now, see this ...


7

The answer to this question is: What does your contract say. If your contract says nothing about copyright transfer then they own the copyright. See the thing is, the person who made the file owns the copyright of the file. Does not really matter what happened before. What about the copyright of the things you did before. Well you own the copyright. But you ...


6

Think of yourself as a carpenter and the client has hired you to trim out a house. You buy the tools, the client pays for the final product (the trim being installed). You walk away with the tools you bought as part of doing business. This is the same with fonts. It's a tool that you as a graphic designer use to produce work for clients. Since the logo ...


6

The guy who created the Obama Hope poster was dinged for violating AP's copyright. While I'm not a lawyer, I'd say if it's for your personal use, you're probably not going to get sued, but if you put it out into the world in any capacity, and/or if you try to make money from it, you'll be in trouble.


6

If your main concern is not wanting to mess up your web design with bylines attached to every graphic, be aware that you generally have some flexibility with how you give attribution. In particular, you may be able to give attribution in HTML comments that don't actually show up on the page. The full legal text of the international version of CC-BY-3.0 ...


6

The material is copyrighted. You can use it under the terms of the CC licence offered, you can negotiate with the copyright owner for a different license. Or find another resource that has a license you're happy with. Or develop your own. Either it's worth doing this right, or it isn't worth doing. Pick one.


6

I am going to stick my head out, as I have thought a good deal about this. I am first and foremost concerned with practicalities and decency and what actually is going on and a viable solution. (Obligatory disclaimer: this is my personal opinion and experience. This does not reflect any law, nor does it cover all kinds of permissions given with various ...


6

GitHub Perhaps obviously (although perhaps not so obviously in the era of Wikipedia and having one's StackExchange Q&A edited by others without asking)...someone's GitHub repository on the web is not something you modify directly. Instead you "fork" it to create your own clone, that only you (and collaborators you designate) can modify. So if the ...


6

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, so I can't take responsbility, yadda yadda yadda. No. 'Changing' a work 'a bit to make it mine' is a so-called derivative work, for which the original author explicitly owns the copyright. Besides, taking someone else's work, changing it a bit, and presenting it as completely your own, wouldn't that be deception or fraud, or ...


6

Photographers selling photos through a stock agency have their own agreement with the agency. The agency then has an agreement with the customer. Who can have objections to the commercial use of such public like places, bridges or buildings? Plenty of people. But note that in most cases, it's not the public place that is copyrighted, but the particular ...


6

If it's clearly Radcliff's likeness, then you'll probably run into a problem. It's to do with a persons privacy rights, and to prevent them looking like they endorse things that they don't. If it is plainly in character as Potter, you'd have a problem there as well, probably with Rowling / her publisher / the movie studio / etc. kinda sounds like it's not a ...


6

No, you can not base your icon on another icon that is a clear copyright breach. Being a free software has no bearing on the issue. See what your trying to do is piggyback on somebody else's work because its already recognized by your potential users. This is exactly the kind of thing copyright is trying to prevent. You need to do your own icons and do ...


6

Redrawing something means you have created derivative work, not original work. (PDF from copyright.gov) Merely "redrawing" something does not, in most instances, grant you an unencumbered copyright. In addition, there is no such thing as "change it by x amount and it's okay". If the original image can be discerned from the copy in any way, it maybe ...


5

If the license says it should be attributed, I don't think it should be questionned if it should be attributed or not. These are the conditions and you are free to make your own visual if the conditions are not right for you. Then again, I am fairly sure that in common practice, a lot of people don't bother attributing even when the license requires it which ...


5

Do you want the possibility of getting work from the new owner? Do you want the possibility of getting more works from the current owner if she every starts a new business? If the answer to one of these question is yes, do not even think about being so daft as to even talk to her about recharging for work you have already charged her for. As to what ...


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