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26

This is called ligature. There is some useful background knowledge on Wikipedia In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph. Many ligatures combine f with an adjacent letter. The most prominent example is fi (or f‌i, rendered with two normal letters). The tittle of the i in many ...


21

There are two types of ligatures. Type 1: The reason ligatures exist is to prevent spaces between some letters which could disturb your reading flow. For example in some fonts "fi" overlap each other or especialy "fl". In order to find a solution for this problem, ligatures were invented, each becoming just one letter on the typeblock: Normal letters vs ...


17

No One Rule Fits All Situations This is all somewhat complicated, because it ties in with kerning support and font selection, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer that will serve for all situations. In my experience, ligatures are more apt to be needed in a tightly set serif roman or italic, not so much in a sans font. For more discussion and ...


8

Discretionary ligatures, by definition, are intended to not be on by default. Standard ligatures are those that the type designer thought should be on by default. The particular ligatures shown, the ct and st ligatures, are historical ligatures that date back centuries. They are considered rather archaic now, and would only be appropriate if one wanted an ...


8

In many fonts designed for readable body text, ligatures tend to be subtle tweaks that are barely noticeable, just fixing what would otherwise be an awkward placement of adjacent letter shapes. The Futura fi ligature in your example, however, isn't really like that — it stands out quite prominently, and is arguably unnecessary, in that the un-ligated ...


7

That lowercase ij is awesome 😄 My first thought was, "wow, low bridge ahead" – but I had a hunch it was to fit in with the rest of descending characters, and so it does. You even use this on the lowercase f, which makes for a fine visual rhythm in fij- words, and it's a very nice change from the usual efs. As for the capital: being a native Dutch speaker, ...


7

As mentioned, this is a ligature, and is one of many similar ligatures such as ffi, fl, ffl, Th, oe and ae. If you're interested in this sort of detail within fonts (and within design, as a larger topic), I'd highly recommend the book Type Matters, by Jim Williams. It's an excellent reference manual for anyone interested in typography, and, if applied in ...


6

To get the arch of the R above the crossbar of the T, I imagine. The E and A are lower and rounded, so the R fits into their negative space, but the T pokes to the left. It's really noticeable. It's irritating my eye quite a bit. The designer(s) did not do a good job with that ligature pair.


5

For ligatures to be supported in an OpenType font, two things need to be there: the actual ligature glyphs (which you can check by scrolling through the glyph table with a symbol picker etc.) and a glyph substitution table that tells software to replace a sequence of characters by a ligature. There’s a handy piece of software called DTL OTMaster Light (free,...


4

You can add css font-variant-ligatures:no-common-ligatures (or font-variant-ligatures:none) to prevent Chrome (and Firefox!) from displaying 'r' that way. IE/Edge don't have the bug. You could also insert ‌ between every pair 'rt' and 'rf' (the problem shows in it, too) in the source text (it's invisible), to make browsers think that the ...


4

I don't know which software you are using, but I recommend you read the FontLab Studio 5 manual. I am going to give you a quick answer on how to do both tasks you mention in FontLab Studio 5. For this example, I drew 3 simple glyphs (f, i, n) and a fi ligature. These are the glyphs in the preview panel: Now, if you click the OpenType Panel button: the ...


3

I did this in Word, but you should be able to do it in anything that has a glyph or symbol viewer. Ligatures are unique characters that have to be created, so just view the glyphs and see if the characters are there! If so, then ligatures are supported for that font. Most fonts will have at least 'fi' and 'fl' glyphs; 'ff', 'ffi', and 'ffl' are common as ...


2

Unfortunately, Photoshop doesn't recognize the ligature table in your version of Baskerville. I get the same result with my TrueType version from Monotype. I have tested Adobe's ITC New Baskerville Std (opentype) and it does work. It looks extremely close to the Monotype version I have, so that's a good way to go if you have it, or can buy it. Aside from ...


1

If you have the time, I urge you to ignore suggestions to don't-even-try-and-use-something-already-done, and at least try to do the new thing you propose. Thus, you can start by reading The OpenType Cookbook in order to understand how the features, lookups, substitutions, etc. work. Then read more and keep asking if you need help. As far as I know, it is ...


1

Baskerville doesn't allow me either to toggle ligatures on or off. It works with other fonts like Myriad Pro Regular for example, the fi ligature in not grayed out in the character's menu. I see 2 options: 1- Change the font or 2- If you really want to keep this font, create your text with the ligature in a word document then save it in PDF with a font ...


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