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12

I think that your first option is a much better practice. I wouldn't treat a numbered list any different than I would design an alphabetical list. Would you setup a book's index in an alternating-column style? Having a reader's eye scan back and forth across multiple columns doesn't sell the continuity that an ordered list should provide. Multiple column ...


6

Option A, for the love of dog, please. Whipping my eyes back and forth to read Option B is exhausting. (This is how Stack Exchange does alphabetical order with the tags, and I hate it.) It's almost like you have to carry too much information from left to right as you hop from one column to the next instead of just skimming downward quickly. I see almost no ...


4

Option A is great, it feels intuitive. Reading columns top-to-bottom is natural for Western readers. Option B is better suited for rows instead of columns, and maybe that's an approach to try; less space between entries, more space between lines. The responsive-friendly point is legitimate, but as it stands now, I think this layout will hinder your content'...


3

Left or right depends on the context, so each option can be good. That's for the designer to decide and there is no 'best practice'. What you can do is improve your choice by using the Open Type tabular numbers feature, explained here: https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/a/110877/62949


3

Google Docs If the intention is to share the list.... Then just with that single factor being predominant, I'd suggest Google Docs which are designed to be easily shared. Then digging further if you want a list, perhaps with dates, turnaround times, or other items in a table-like structure, a Google Doc Spreadsheet seems to be a good choice. There is also ...


3

If working with a .INDB file (Indesign book), with separate docs as chapters: Primary section: set as numbered list - level 1. Create a new list, uncheck "Continue Numbers From Previous Document In Book" in the options, then name and save the list. (No need to set your "Drop cap" paragraph as a list) Secondary section: set as numbered list - level 2. ...


2

Assuming that the numbers are a part of the text and can be styled as a paragraph you can set up a paragraph style that uses Rules as faux backgrounds. Create a new paragraph style and set Character Color → [Paper]. Set a Rule Above with a weight as high as you want the background and a negative Offset so that it is vertically centered on your number. Make ...


2

My guess is you have a character style affecting the first bullet. To do this properly create a paragraph style for the list and apply it while removing overrides. This should clean up any 'mixed' formatting.


2

Place the cursor on the first paragraph of your second list, go to 'Bullets & Numbering' and change the mode from 'Continue from previous number' to 'Start At' and type '1' in the next box.


2

This is really a matter of opinion. I prefer right aligned numbers, then inset, left aligned text to the right of the numbers. I also prefer my numbered list to not have periods or parentheses at all. That is unless at least one of the list item text also starts with a number - then I'll use a close parenthesis to separate the bullet from the content. 1 ...


1

I've never heard of or thought about spread numbering before, but why not? I see (at least) five different ways to do this. Most of them aren't "dynamic" in the sense that if you start moving spreads around, the numbering won't be correct anymore. Numbering (not dynamic) You can use a paragraph style with Numbering as in the link you've provided, but ...


1

I don't have time to test it right now, but what if you created a new level 2 list with the standard numeral format (not Roman numerals)? Then make your current level 2 list a level 3 list, using the level 2 numbers instead of the roman numerals. You won't ever really see the level 2 list in your document, but you should be able to use it to format your ...


1

If you do not need live numbering, simply add a textbox for the identifier. InDesign allow freeform textboxes. An example: The full display, when writing is this: Construct master pages to keep the common elements such as page numbers in good shape. Create styles for titles, tables and other text types.


1

When I make a list like yours, by default the lines wrap. Check your indent boxes on the top tool bar (circled in red below).


1

You're doing it right, just type this into the NUMBER field: ^#.^t


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