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11

At first glance, this may look like a typographical overshoot, i.e., round bases and tops of letters extending a bit further up- or downwards than flat ones – which accounts for an optical illusion. However, if you look closely, you will note that the logo and the S already feature an overshoot in the original. Also, in the corrected version, the overshoot ...


9

In typography, this is called an overshoot. And has been a very long-standing practice. In typeface design, the overshoot of a round or pointed letter (like O or A) is the degree to which it extends higher or lower than a comparably sized "flat" letter (like X or H), to achieve an optical effect of being the same size; it compensates for inaccuracies in ...


5

Inconsistencies kill this for me. One cloud is "overly" puffy with many "poofs". While the other.... has none. This factor is far too distracting overall. Visual consistency should be considered, in my opinion. Solid or hollow makes no difference. I can't get past this discrepancy. It's easy to accept the first image as a cloud.... but then you see the ...


5

You have find an old visual fact. If you carefully check high quality fonts, you see the glyphs are aligned for even subjective appearance, not for strict alignment of the midlines or edges. The fine placement can be switched on or off or adjusted in typesetting software such as Indesign. For that reason the line startings can seem at first slightly ragged, ...


2

Your name says dolphin, but your logo, and particular your icon doesn’t say dolphin. I know there is a tiny fin and waves, but this is more whispering dolphin than saying it. Here are two quick sketches of how you could scream dolphin (if that’s what you want): Another advantage is that it reads more like a D and thus makes your entire name more readable. ...


2

It's olphix + a shape in front of it. Let your name be visible as a whole. It's very difficult to mix an icon and a letter as one symbol without generating reading errors. You haven't succeeded. It's much easier to write Dolphix and insert a separate icon. Another thing: It somehow resembles a text in a medicine or food supplement package, like this: ...


2

Just to add to what's been posted. This is why it's very important to have a contract and to communicate through email. Emails can be tracked back. Including a link to a DropBox for file download of a rendered PDF will not work. When doing logo design the options should be included in the email and I'd advise creating an email template similar to how ...


2

I'm not a lawyer or barrister, and I don't play one on TV; hence any advice I dispense is not legal advice, and is somewhere between suspect, apocryphal and commonsense: take nothing at face value and do your own research in your locale. I am a multi-decade graphic designer and illustrator, and as a result I've been round the roundabout on IP issues - this ...


2

I understand immediately what type of company this logo is for, so well done on that perspective! My main concern is that the character looks so different and almost de-attached from the mountain: You have these thick outlines and bold, harsh lines on the mountain and soft, round lines on the character, so that it almost looks as from a different logo ...


2

The creature with round forms doesn't sit well with the angular mountain. The moustache and the non-fitting form together can rise unwanted ideas like this: If there must be something above the mountain (I guess a little more symmetric mountain alone would be ok), it can well be a hiker or something in the sky like the sun, birds or another, but more ...


1

Looks a bit unfinished: i prefer the non-modified typo bottom left version the mountain is too heavy, too much black fill. add some more white or simplify the mountain shape the weasel thing is kind of cartoonish. simplify the shape, google 'animal icons' and see what that means. not really sure you need the weasel really, but that's your choice


1

In addition to what Scott noted about your clouds not matching, I think you are facing the following dilemma: A cloud shape that can be recognised as such has to have a certain complexity, while still being all round and geometric. By contrast, typefaces that are mostly round and geometric are almost inevitably not complex. So either your clouds stand out as ...


1

I think choosing a design that provides a perfect depiction can be a bit of a drag. I've taking a close look at this design and I believe the solid cloud provides a more accurate representation of "soon" in "monsoon". However, you might wanna consider adding the rain drops beneath the "oo". The overall design is pretty simple and minimal which is a good ...


1

Your swan logo and the typeface only match in one aspect and that is featuring round forms. Your logo is simplistic, while your typeface is ornamental. Your logo features flat solid shapes, while your typeface is more delicate, having a lot of thin strokes. Your logo expresses calmness, while your typeface expresses motion. Your logo says constructed, while ...


1

I don't know if this will answer your question or not.... I'm uncertain if anyone here who is not directly affiliated with NASA or the joint agency could provide any answer. In the past I've worked for the Department of the Army. Not quite NASA, but similar. When joint ventures were undertaken or corporate sponsorship was involved, there was an office ...


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