Hot answers tagged

233

To prevent possible rendering artefacts. Without the notches you're likely to see the edges of the bottom shapes where they meet the edges of the overlaying shapes (on screen anyway, it's not really a problem when printing). You can see examples and explanation of the possible artefacts here: Image looks embossed when converted to SVG How to put one ...


79

The general principle: styles and associations come in and out of fashion - sometimes led by technical limitations changing, often just because of whimseys of fashion. While fashionable, some weaknesses with the design or style pass unnoticed. When a style goes out of fashion, it becomes associated with the era when it was fashionable. So when a design ...


78

I would explain to them that although it is "technically" a font. In this case they should see the logo not as a "word written in a font" but as "typographic word-mark". Ask them to consider the Coca Cola word-mark. Would Coca Cola write body text in that style? No. I think the key terminology for you here is word-mark. A second idea, dodgy at best, is to ...


69

I personally don't find this picture suitable for a logo. It has shading, complicated color changes, and tiny detail - it looks around 6x6 cm on my monitor, and has tiny stars which might be a single pixel at that blown-up size. Logos are meant to be used in a lot of different contexts, and instantly recognizable (without change) when printed in reduced ...


64

No. In case that wasn't clear: don't do this. Never change colours in a logo of a third party yourself. Any good logo has alternatives with less or secondary colours, or even a negative (light for on dark background). Use that. As Billy Kerr suggests, many big companies have dedicated download packs with all kinds of alternatives for you to use. They ...


61

Understanding rasterization and the painter's algorithm might help. One way of rendering vector graphics (graphics defined by polygons, instead of pixels) to pixels is to rasterize the polygons while running the painter's algorithm. The painter's algorithm is a bottom-up process where you first put down the background, then draw on top of that background ...


50

An answer: The bag should output something - the text or something else in a cake. Let the business name be the biggest element.


48

Pretty much all Gen-Y or young "startup" use that "let's see if we're a good fit" catch phrase. And promise "more work coming" blablabla. Seriously. In other words, it means "we have no money and we're still struggling paying off those 200 nice cups and T-Shirts we ordered with our Word logo on them, and fancy photoshoots of our team of 3, etc.". You ...


48

There's many good answers for this. One thing I can suggest is to simply present the logo to the real business by explaining it the same way you did here! The fact that your logo got a lot of attention already is something that might be appealing to that business. This way, you won't feel like you're judging their logo; you're simply presenting them some ...


48

Cai is correct. I thought I'd add a visual answer as well. The reason this happens is that it's an SVG. Unlike a raster image where you control each rendered pixel, the rasterization of the SVG happens in the browser...so the browser makes these decisions. One of the decisions the browser has to make is when to do anti-aliasing. It will typically do this ...


46

It's interesting, but (I assume) It's really the three dots that is the tie into 'TRItium'. As such, I'd consider dumping both the circle and the hexagon. They seem superfluous to the concept. They are nice, but (and this is just my opinion) in the world of software, those tend to give off a bit of a video game vibe--which may or may not be your objective. ...


44

It probably has to do with how we perceive our state of technology and major trends that drive our society. Does it make sense? Sometimes, I suppose ... Look at the evolution of the BP logo. Throughout the year an outline and colour was added. Today it resembles a yellow and green sunflower probably referring to the customer's desire to purchase more ...


43

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


41

Well, I would hate to go against the crowd here, but I totally disagree that you need to rethink your design. In fact, I think the reasoning behind your idea is very solid. The idea of using the fiber optics as a symbol for connectivity is clever without being contrived and most importantly, it gives you a gut feeling of "this is a technology company" while ...


40

If they want to try you out (fair enough), and their budget is $300, offer something else you are willing to do for that price (a business card proposal? A presentation template? a website banner?) that can show off your skills, test your relationship with the client, and give them something of value. It doesn't have to be a logo or nothing. If they're not ...


38

No, not at all. It doesn't have nearly enough similarities to count as plagiarism. Yes, they both feature a tree. As do many, many logos. The style is different, the use of colors, the whole setup is different. However, if the other company is widely known in your field and you are afraid your clients might confuse you with each other, you could consider ...


36

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


35

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


34

The circle (or otherwise white mark) is a meant to be a reflection. The reflection makes it more realistic and understandable as an icon. As seen in a google image search, our eyes are pretty reflective and we often perceive this even if we don't consciously think about it. As Andrew H notes, this reflection is called a catch light. Below is one for example:...


33

It's called a Moiré pattern. It forms when two 'grid' patterns (loose term that could apply to geometric lines, dots, etc.) are overlaid with each other and moved. In this case, the two 'grid patterns' are the image, itself (which is geometric lines) and the pixel based screen-refresh of your screen. A similar effect is when newscasters would wear ...


33

It depends on the logo and how it's done. You should avoid reversing the logo, but it may make sense in rare cases to reverse it. For example, Nike reverses their logo on their high socks when their logo is on the ankle (but PUMA doesn't seem to). As mentioned in the comments, it's pretty common practice for airlines to mirror their logo on their planes as ...


32

I point out to clients that large logos are the equivalent to SCREAMING at customers. When you walk into a store, do you want the sales rep to come up to you and scream, "HI! WHAT CAN I GET FOR YOU TODAY?!" or would you rather have the rep walk up and quietly ask, "Hi, what can I help you with today?" (It carries more weight when spoken :) ) I ask them to ...


32

Is it obsolete to use a floppy disk to represent a "save"? Icons and logos don't need to be literal, the important thing is communication. If a mouse pointer conveys the meaning you want it to then there is nothing wrong with it. Even if mobile web browsing is overtaking desktop browsing, very few people will be unfamiliar with a mouse pointer. Maybe in 10 ...


30

If you want to be sure that the text will have the same appearance in every case - First, you can Expand the text before saving as svg Second, in font part of saving dialog you can press "convert to outline"


30

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, logos, ...


29

Unpopular personal opinion :)) With that being said ( :)) ), let's put things into perspective, ok? You have a contract, in that contract you agreed to supply 3 concept designs out of which they chose only one! That's it! In any such contract, you should also add that if the client should want 2 or all 3 concepts developed and delivered, they agree to pay ...


29

This is a blend between the outer circle and the inner ellipse. Draw both ellipse and circle, both with a stroke colour and no fill. Align their centers so they overlap. Select the 'blend' tool. Click once on the top anchor of the circle. Then click the right-hand anchor of the ellipse. Double-click the blend tool in the toolbox to have a dialog box pop ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


28

Using Illustrator To create those branches of barley like that, you could draw them straight then create an Art Brush out of them: Create a new Art Brush Select your art, then Brushes panel click the New Brush button in the bottom right Apply the art brush to a curve The brush will nicely flow with whatever curves you apply it to


28

The Lowest Common Denominator vs. Highest Common Factor Approach™ Define how much available space you have by creating, placing, and balancing empty elements within your design. I chose to use the Golden Ratio for the above (100px x 161px) because it's better to work with a horizontal rectangle, than it is with a perfect square based on most logos being ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible