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36

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


21

Your customers don't have to understand your name. Your customers don't have to understand your logo. Your customers do have to remember both. To make it easier to remember you'll typically make a logo that relates to the name. The most important thing though is that its memorable. Any reasoning behind it quite honestly doesn't matter. A mentor of mine ...


20

Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) are sold to consumers, and one of the fundamental principles of marketing is the market segmentation. Companies offer various products for the various segments based on their income level. So in order to target a certain audience, you need to know the average income. A premium-looking product will appeal to a different ...


18

People which frequent "Horror" movies are generally not the same people which attend the "Emotional Drama". Both equally viable audiences, but vastly different in terms of what appeals to them. The same general division can be found in financial capabilities. A family bordering on the poverty line are not the people purchasing luxury items. And luxury item ...


13

Overall it's a solid, fairly well defined, image. Even at smaller sizes it holds up for the most part: There is no "F" implied. With a gun to my head I might be able to say there's a reversed "E" in the r, but that's as close as I'd get. (Unless the Danish F is different than the English F) There is no "M" implied. I have no clue where you may be seeing ...


13

Ambiguity or unreadability is not always a bad thing in a logo. Being too literal can, at times, cause a design to suffer. It all inevitably comes down to how a mark is going to be used. An unreadable logo by itself can be detrimental to a startup or a company without a decent marketing budget. If the goal is to just throw the mark on items or good and have ...


12

At first glance, this may look like a typographical overshoot, i.e., round bases and tops of letters extending a bit further up- or downwards than flat ones – which accounts for an optical illusion. However, if you look closely, you will note that the logo and the S already feature an overshoot in the original. Also, in the corrected version, the overshoot ...


11

According to what you describe in the question, I think it's a combination of two logos in a square area rather than a single logo adaptation to a square format. It seems to be a company and its franchisor or representative. In fact, the adaptation to each logo separately has already been done, the first one fits in a square and the other choosing just the ...


11

In typography, this is called an overshoot. And has been a very long-standing practice. In typeface design, the overshoot of a round or pointed letter (like O or A) is the degree to which it extends higher or lower than a comparably sized "flat" letter (like X or H), to achieve an optical effect of being the same size; it compensates for inaccuracies in ...


11

Since I like playing devil's advocate, I'll elaborate on situations where I think that kind of request would make sense. (spoiler: there aren't many) You have a client who has shown to be respectful of your work and time in the past, and the changes are content based, and there is a lot. Example from my experience: I had a client who is a pipe organ ...


10

I think you have a good logo at the conceptual level, but formally can improve. The arcs formed by the colors and their subdivisions create virtual construction axes that are not reflected anywhere in the rest of the logo, there's no any coincidence, which clearly shows that the position is totally arbitrary. This is not wrong, but conceptually shows ...


10

I don't think it's "normal", although there are probably designers who do it. When deadlines have been tight, I've collaborated with clients over the phone while sharing static images with them at the same time using the Adobe Cloud, however I think screen sharing is akin to having the client stand behind you, and it's too invasive. Personally, I wouldn't ...


9

For those of you looking to do this automatically with a CMS or Javascript, there's a short formula I came up with that can take in most all logo sizes and make them visually consistent. Here it is in Javascript: (function() { "use strict"; window.onload = function() { var images = document.querySelectorAll(".media-images.media-images--config-...


9

Do my potential customers need to understand the “meaning” of a logo? If a 100% understanding is not achieved graphically, at least it should have a hint of the meaning. Do my potential customers need to recognize my logo? 100% yes. As in everything, I think it's about reaching a balance, if it turns in favor of one of the two options, much better for ...


8

You could use a pattern along a path effect. Here's an example. The pattern itself was simply a small circle (shown top left), which was copied to the clip board, then applied as a pattern to a larger circle: More info about pattern along a path functionality here


7

The problem is not to align a circle between two others, or maybe you have the alignment to pixels activated ... whatever The problem is you are thinking in technical drawing and not in a vector drawing way Once you have the two circles, make a perpendicular path where the head ends Create a shape using this path as the top side (red in the animation) ...


7

From Flat to Fluid The main improvement is the fluidity in the design, in my opinion a perfect adaptation of Microsoft Fluid Design to the icons of its own applications. While the old logo is 100% flat design, the new one could be flat 2.0 if it were simply this logo, by the shadows and gradients addition: But it's not just that, the new logos are ...


7

Sorry if this comes across a bit harsh. It's honestly not meant to be anything other than helpful. I have no stake in how good or bad your logo may be. I can only offer some suggestions I would follow in my own effort to create a logo for myself, or another designer in general. You are posting this at a design-oriented site asking designers about a logo for ...


7

This is a micromanager. This person is, as Billy Kerr notes, trying to stand over your shoulder and tell you exactly what to do. That is not a client you want to accommodate. Maybe this person doesn't trust you as a designer to execute his or her ideas, or thinks that his/her ideas are better than yours, or whatever the person's problem is. That doesn't ...


7

Optical corrections are a feature of high quality graphic design. What is important is how things are perceived (typically to maintain coherence/alignments, and fulfill the viewers' expectations) The positioning of elements in software is often based on their bounding boxes, which don't account for their more specific shape. Visually, a triangle will be ...


7

Instead of working with circle arcs, do it with complete circles with dashed strokes and change the dash and gap sizes. In this example, starting with two circles blend (left), expanded and ungrouped it, add a dashed stroke and change the dash and gap size individually. Rotate the circles to match the position. Expand appearance when it's ready.


6

You are going to have to simplify the image in some way, such that it looks good and is readable/recognisable at any size. The two examples you posted fail in this regard. This is something you would need to speak to your client about. For example, how much creative licence do you have? Is the Bosch Service logo inviolate? You may even need to check the ...


6

Symbolism: Ordinary people who do not think waves nor communication, probably see a classical auditorium layout, where the committee is in the focus. That also can be an acceptable foundation for your shape. Placements and orientations: Move things to connect the texts and the colored curves, create a wandering route to the eye. Tilted appearance can be ...


6

Redrawing something means you have created derivative work, not original work. (PDF from copyright.gov) Merely "redrawing" something does not, in most instances, grant you an unencumbered copyright. In addition, there is no such thing as "change it by x amount and it's okay". If the original image can be discerned from the copy in any way, it maybe ...


6

You can try to make a brush In the left there's a large horizontal piece of a pattern. It's dragged to the brushes collection and defined to be an artistic brush. A curve has been drawn, the brush is applied to it. The red shape is a random body which follows approximately the curvature of the previous curve. It's used as a clipping mask in the rightmost ...


6

Not normal practice and you probably already know this from the way the question is asked. This is apparently about a logo so it cannot be text revisions, in which case he's probably looking to give you some ideas on revising the shape, the color, the symbol or whatever it is you are working on this logo. So it can't be a large volume of requests, instead ...


5

Polar format will fit inside a square and there's some room even left over. An example (sorry for poor transformation accuracy


5

Answering your question by parts: — I've merged Female symbol and letter H — The female symbol ♀ is the sign of the gender derived from the astrological symbols, which denoted the classic planet Venus. Also the feminine sign represents feminism in philosophy and sociology. This symbol is in use since the Renaissance, denoting alchemical elements, ...


5

You have find an old visual fact. If you carefully check high quality fonts, you see the glyphs are aligned for even subjective appearance, not for strict alignment of the midlines or edges. The fine placement can be switched on or off or adjusted in typesetting software such as Indesign. For that reason the line startings can seem at first slightly ragged, ...


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