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69

I personally don't find this picture suitable for a logo. It has shading, complicated color changes, and tiny detail - it looks around 6x6 cm on my monitor, and has tiny stars which might be a single pixel at that blown-up size. Logos are meant to be used in a lot of different contexts, and instantly recognizable (without change) when printed in reduced ...


36

This kind of depends upon who you ask. Here.... it would never be an option. Much the same way I do not work with a client standing behind me "dictating changes". There is no feasible reason why a client needs to be that close. If they wish to micro-manage to that degree, they need to hire an employee. As a freelancer, it is asking far too much in my ...


29

I've been in and out of the graphic design world over several decades, and have also spent a lot of time in both technical writing / illustration and architectural design & 3D modeling - in all those professional spheres, I've used screen sharing for communicating final presentations or interactive demos, I've used screensharing to teach, and on several ...


27

Many times it happens, and it's very common in questions made here, that what is trying to show is only seen in the explanation and not in the image. In this case neither barley spike nor character Æ are perceived. The question: A very common vice in us, the designers, is to create images from our memory when the logic work should be taking the real object ...


24

The easiest, clearest solution to this problem is to not use figures of any kind in the logo. Stick to symbology and type modification. If the symbology uses some sort of nondescript "stickman-like" figure that may be acceptable. However, color will play a large role there. And one can mistakenly start getting into "cartoon" type of figures which may ...


22

Combination marks According to 99designs there are seven types of logos*: Abstract Emblem Lettermark Mascots Pictorial Wordmark Combination marks A combination mark is a logo comprised of a combined wordmark or lettermark and a pictorial mark, abstract mark, or mascot. The conclusion would be combination mark + slogan. *These names usually vary ...


20

Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) are sold to consumers, and one of the fundamental principles of marketing is the market segmentation. Companies offer various products for the various segments based on their income level. So in order to target a certain audience, you need to know the average income. A premium-looking product will appeal to a different ...


20

Your customers don't have to understand your name. Your customers don't have to understand your logo. Your customers do have to remember both. To make it easier to remember you'll typically make a logo that relates to the name. The most important thing though is that its memorable. Any reasoning behind it quite honestly doesn't matter. A mentor of mine ...


19

Make the character more obscure, since you're trying to represent humans in general. Unless it's a mascot – then using race is OK. It needs to be much simpler. It's not memorable to me, other than it stands out looking like a propaganda piece for some sci-fi dystopia communist movement. No disrespect to the designer. You need to ask the designer to ...


18

Ok. Finally, the postmodern era has reached this forum. I can not fully express my politically incorrect view on the "I am offended" part. But I will address some inconsistencies on the logo itself. That is not a logo, that is an illustration, a mission patch or something similar. It is very nice as such, but as a logo it needs to be simplified. A lot ...


18

People which frequent "Horror" movies are generally not the same people which attend the "Emotional Drama". Both equally viable audiences, but vastly different in terms of what appeals to them. The same general division can be found in financial capabilities. A family bordering on the poverty line are not the people purchasing luxury items. And luxury item ...


16

Is the angles in the "Æ" too sharp? (See α in below image), making it too difficult to read the logo as an "Æ"? Yes, I have a very difficult time reading the logo with the Æ at that angle. It is very important that a logo/wordmark containing letters is instantly legible. if you'd like to include a glyph in your name I suggest playing with the simplest ...


14

I've seen the use of colors which aren't a skin color, such as blue or orange or even gray to fix this problem. You should also consider simplifying the character (and the logo as a whole) Source PragerU sometimes uses a dark blue for people: I've seen others go with a silhouette In all of the above examples, they used one solid color for the skin-tone, ...


13

How can I avoid that the logo be perceived as unfair or racist or whatsoever? Ok, this is a site of questions and answers about graphic design, as you will understand it's impossible that any of those who participate in this site can answer about how your logo will be perceived. Not here or anywhere. We should make a campaign to use the logo and then a ...


13

I see a few issues... Æ is not a commonly known, or pronounced, glyph - at least in the US. Yes, you see it at times, but it's not really that familiar to many people. For a logo which ideally would gain immediate memory traction, it's a hurdle from the start. (Be aware, designers [and Norwegians, Danes, etc] may be more familiar with the glyph than the ...


13

Overall it's a solid, fairly well defined, image. Even at smaller sizes it holds up for the most part: There is no "F" implied. With a gun to my head I might be able to say there's a reversed "E" in the r, but that's as close as I'd get. (Unless the Danish F is different than the English F) There is no "M" implied. I have no clue where you may be seeing ...


13

Ambiguity or unreadability is not always a bad thing in a logo. Being too literal can, at times, cause a design to suffer. It all inevitably comes down to how a mark is going to be used. An unreadable logo by itself can be detrimental to a startup or a company without a decent marketing budget. If the goal is to just throw the mark on items or good and have ...


11

I post this second answer using translated Spanish words, my apologies if any of them do not match the reader's usual vocabulary or dictionary. This is how I know the definition of a graphic representation as a company image. There are five types: Typogram Monogram Acronym Slogan Pictogram Ideogram Mascots Heraldry Typogram Graphic representation of a ...


11

According to what you describe in the question, I think it's a combination of two logos in a square area rather than a single logo adaptation to a square format. It seems to be a company and its franchisor or representative. In fact, the adaptation to each logo separately has already been done, the first one fits in a square and the other choosing just the ...


11

At first glance, this may look like a typographical overshoot, i.e., round bases and tops of letters extending a bit further up- or downwards than flat ones – which accounts for an optical illusion. However, if you look closely, you will note that the logo and the S already feature an overshoot in the original. Also, in the corrected version, the overshoot ...


11

Since I like playing devil's advocate, I'll elaborate on situations where I think that kind of request would make sense. (spoiler: there aren't many) You have a client who has shown to be respectful of your work and time in the past, and the changes are content based, and there is a lot. Example from my experience: I had a client who is a pipe organ ...


10

In typography, this is called an overshoot. And has been a very long-standing practice. In typeface design, the overshoot of a round or pointed letter (like O or A) is the degree to which it extends higher or lower than a comparably sized "flat" letter (like X or H), to achieve an optical effect of being the same size; it compensates for inaccuracies in ...


10

I don't think it's "normal", although there are probably designers who do it. When deadlines have been tight, I've collaborated with clients over the phone while sharing static images with them at the same time using the Adobe Cloud, however I think screen sharing is akin to having the client stand behind you, and it's too invasive. Personally, I wouldn't ...


9

For those of you looking to do this automatically with a CMS or Javascript, there's a short formula I came up with that can take in most all logo sizes and make them visually consistent. Here it is in Javascript: (function() { "use strict"; window.onload = function() { var images = document.querySelectorAll(".media-images.media-images--config-...


9

Might be worth adding some non letterform elements to reinforce the barley aspect, and contrast natural curvilinear forms with the rigidity of the text... don't take the font in my quickie seriously - I'm at a client site on a client machine without my typical array of fonts available - see the concept rather than the execution: both contrasting with and ...


9

I think you have a good logo at the conceptual level, but formally can improve. The arcs formed by the colors and their subdivisions create virtual construction axes that are not reflected anywhere in the rest of the logo, there's no any coincidence, which clearly shows that the position is totally arbitrary. This is not wrong, but conceptually shows ...


9

Do my potential customers need to understand the “meaning” of a logo? If a 100% understanding is not achieved graphically, at least it should have a hint of the meaning. Do my potential customers need to recognize my logo? 100% yes. As in everything, I think it's about reaching a balance, if it turns in favor of one of the two options, much better for ...


8

You could use a pattern along a path effect. Here's an example. The pattern itself was simply a small circle (shown top left), which was copied to the clip board, then applied as a pattern to a larger circle: More info about pattern along a path functionality here


7

Your grain-AE is solvable. Let it be dominant, not only a letter between the others. It's readable even as distorted if it's seen first. You have also several other possiblities to lift up something traditional. There was an era well before the invention of gunpowder when Norwegians spended glorious days and did what they wanted (see NOTE1). You can ...


7

The problem is not to align a circle between two others, or maybe you have the alignment to pixels activated ... whatever The problem is you are thinking in technical drawing and not in a vector drawing way Once you have the two circles, make a perpendicular path where the head ends Create a shape using this path as the top side (red in the animation) ...


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