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All those logos (size: medium/high) Medium and high is not a measure to measure measurable logos :o) One more adequate is pixels. How many pixels does the logo have? 100x100px? 1000x1000px? More? is the logo on SVG format? are downloaded from the web There is no such thing as "from the web". You could have a repository of high-resolution logos, the ...


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If your banner is to be printed directly on the vinyl, you'll want the highest resolution you can get for the images. Small images when enlarged to the size required for a banner will become pixelated. As Lucian suggests, vector format is preferred, especially if you are going to have the graphics created from adhesive vinyl using a sign cutter or similar ...


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This depends on the size of the banner, but generally, unless they are all in a vector format (AI, EPS, SVG) — which ensures the sharpest quality — they will not be good enough to print. Many times people get logos from the internet and they are low resolution JPG or PNG files which can generally work for a Powerpoint, but not for print. If you're ...


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You can't get that with the Drop Shadow effect, but instead: Select your original T shape Do an offset via Object → Path → Offset Path Create a copy of the offset shape and ALT+SHIFT+Drag diagonally Create an Object → Blend between these 2 offset shapes with 'Specified Distance' set to 0


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Like Luciano said, your shadow and highlight on the main element are too extreme. Inside on the letters, the problem is in the colors. The highlight should be a lighter shade of the object, while the shadow should be a darker shade of whatever is beneath it. I would also recommend blurring them a bit more


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If you look at other neumorphism examples you should quickly notice a few key details: outer highlight and shadow are subtle and have low contrast compared to the background. You could fix yours by just making them transparent. the light and shadow are also very soft, you need to increase the blur on yours. Check also the example below:


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You can probably* use all of the fonts that were pre-installed on your PC/Mac for any purpose - commercial or otherwise. These pre-installed fonts are licensed by Microsoft/Apple for use on computers for any purpose. However, fonts are certainly copyrightable, but that means you can't redistribute the font files in most cases. It doesn't mean you can't use ...


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It's entirely likely that it's a custom design. The giveaways are that there's a gradient fill, two outlines, and an associated graphic element in the same style. There are many "gamer" fonts out there that you can use with free licenses, but a lot of them, including this one from RBLXWARE, breaks many traditional typeface design practices and principles.


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it's useful if you have a sketch which resembles as accurately as possible the objective you seek. "Just like the following picture" is merely a reference and not particularly useful to reach your goal. Can you sketch out with paper and pencil the design you require? If you cannot start with a hand-made work of art, it's going to be nearly impossible to ...


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Personal opinion.... I dislike the thinner font weight. The more open counters are nice, but the thinner stroke weights are contrary to the mark. Kerning is better in the thin type, especially surrounding the "o" and "g". But I'd still prefer a thicker face if it were my brand. In addition, the left angle of the mark's "A" has a "bump" in it. It's not ...


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20 years! This is a very personal opinion which you are free to consider or not :) After using these ultra classic font families myself for a long time, I'm now moving away from these and trying out the new wave of font design. There's alot of crazy fonts out there and these could potentially work for a multimedia business. Also, moving from black to blue ...


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