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The question does not specify what's the product represented by the logo, but I think the name/image conjunction refers to something that has to do with the chosen perspective and the shadow: the cyan angle is suspended in the air. Follow the construction grid will always result in a distorted text, something not very functional for a company image, ...


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This is very crude, and based merely in your posted image..... I'd have a tendency to try and repeat angles and the shading presented by the iconography to be more uniform in the mark overall. The grey would have to be lighten though (as I've done) to make that lighter blue readable. And the angel of the type in my sample is terrible, I know. It's merely ...


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Sorry if this comes across a bit harsh. It's honestly not meant to be anything other than helpful. I have no stake in how good or bad your logo may be. I can only offer some suggestions I would follow in my own effort to create a logo for myself, or another designer in general. You are posting this at a design-oriented site asking designers about a logo for ...


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I can give you some recommendations while creating your logo: While the typographic part seems to be that you already have it resolved, I think you should forget it for now and focus on the image I would also propose to forget the color issue for the time being, color sometimes distracts us from the main idea, at the beginning of the development of a ...


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It's now very formal and angular. The pen nibs probably cannot be recognized as tools because they do nothing but exist. If you see a pen as a good thing to show, put it to draw something that you consider you master. You can for ex. develop a signature mark. You had in your previous attempt one. An abstract, but definitely your own shape will do. Nothing ...


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Here is an explanation of the way I work on this case. It's is simple and effective as you can see.


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Once outlined, it’s down to actually working with the vectors - trimming and shifting snd relayering - one quick trip to speed this up: black fill, white stroke will make the first steps easier.


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Here is what I would suggest as a possible explanation of the logo: The colors represent the Google brand The blue ball represents the world (a la "world" wide web) The colored sections around the blue ball represent the variety and continual movement and exchange of information on the internet, as well as the constant crawling of the internet done by by ...


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There are many things that can be improved on your logo In graphic design there aren't many dogmas, but I dare to say one of them is never present a framed logo unless that frame belongs to the design. The grey frames are destroying your three logos. If this were for a client, he/she would wonder how the logo would look like alone, without the grey frame. ...


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Ask yourself a simple question: What explicit rights are granted (whether by contract or verbal agreement) when you and a client agree to you working on a logo for them? They expect to pay for thinking / process / production design work, and they expect to pay for a logo or logo family, complete with alternate colour treatments (4-colour, duo tone, b&w,...


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Unless they mentioned that in the original briefing or in a contract, presumably they will only pay for the one they selected and that's the only thing they should be getting.


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I personally keep all the unused versions, and don't feel the client has any right to anything except the one they paid for. Unused versions, especially if they are entirely different takes, could apply to a different (future) client and be used later.


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You can try to make a brush In the left there's a large horizontal piece of a pattern. It's dragged to the brushes collection and defined to be an artistic brush. A curve has been drawn, the brush is applied to it. The red shape is a random body which follows approximately the curvature of the previous curve. It's used as a clipping mask in the rightmost ...


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I prefer a more active concept, and one in which the line of action follows the more-typical international graphic language in which the downwards portion of the cigarette is the burning end - makes clear the intended action - stopping. More over, your smoke lines are a bit too happily-jauntily-ongoing - doesn't look like stopping smoking - the position and ...


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The Q is certainly easily seen, especially with the association to the other letters. In short order, the cigarette is also quite clear. This is due to the implied smoke from the tip, but also due to the associated "filter" of the cigarette outside the circle. The ban icon is nearly universal and also easily perceived, perhaps from its simplicity of ...


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Just copy/paste "⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤⬤" as text, select it and your circle (which should be a path), and use Text > Put on Path. Boom! No complicated steps, no changing your circle, no distorted dots (which is what "Pattern along Path" gives you, especially when you have large dots). Plus it works well no matter the shape you're putting the dots on.


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I do not believe there is a "correct" angle for the divider. However most, if not all, governmental or "official" agencies will use the -45° angle on signage.


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I realise this is an old question and I'm very late to the party, but the answer is no. The image is copyright. This is the relevant quote from the Dribble Terms of Service page. It really couldn't be more clear. All Content uploaded are copyright © their respective owners.


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You draw a rectangle (if that's needed) and write a new text object layered above the rectangle. Use what colors you need. Adjust letter spacing. Unfortunately I cannot be sure what font is the original. Your image is so unsharp that numerous grotesque types seem to fit and even more will fit, if you stretch horizontally those which have too narrow letters....


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Set the stroke width and change the Profile type (1) Add a gradient to the stroke and choose Apply Gradient Across Stroke (2)


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Since you stated that you could use either Photoshop or Sketch, I wanted to mimic @Danielillo's answer but using Sketch this time. Disclaimer: The result is far from perfect, I'll just explain the different steps I've taken to almost recreate the Bootstrap logo. 1. Shape First, we'll insert a rounder corner rectangle into our blank Sketch page using ...


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