New answers tagged

3

The font is called "Slant" on FontZillion.


2

Font engines dont work in way that allow you to predict the width of the object, because it varies for each combination of letters. There is thus no way to calculate the width in advance from the size metric.* What you do is you type out the value measure the result then scale the graphic propotionally. Now one of the defiencies of Word and inddeed most ...


2

I've worked as an executive creative director, art director and creative busines realtionship developer since 1997. Including just over a year long stint at Stack Exchange (when stack overflow got too big for its britches) as it's first actual art director... so the citations will be how my businesses or the expectations of the businesses I worked at handled ...


11

The main aspect of this logo that confused me is the similarity of the first symbol to an at sign. For example, look at the logo compared to the primary image on the Wikipedia page for an at sign: vs This similarity led me to consider the names Athua, Atlhua, and Alhua. However, the name Dahua never crossed my mind. Additionally, if I had previously been ...


24

I somewhat disagree with the existing answers and think the fundamental problems are these: The d has lost too many properties fundamental to a d and the Latin alphabet in general: The bowl is too big and too thin in comparison to the stem. Usually, strokes going in the same direction should have the same width. The bowl goes below the baseline – which is ...


43

Eye movement Regardless of whether a language employs left-to-right or right-to-left reading, in order for a word, any word, to be comprehended easily you can't ask the reader to "zig zag" mid-word. While I would have never deciphered the actual name from this mark... once I know it's supposed to be "dahua", it's clear the designer is ...


11

Personally, I feel the major fail is not fully comprehending the western left to right reading bias. Left to right reading is a stronger influence than 'read the red letter first, then the black ones'. So, reading left to right you get… an a in a circle, followed by a red j, then hua. Breaking the circle where technology is written reinforces the j over l ...


0

I am not a pro just giving my opinion,to me at the first glance, it looks like a car wash logo. also if they try to embroider logos with outline , it will be nightmare to keep the two colors register. Imagine everything needs to fit in 3.5"-4" wide area and still be legible.


2

When you ask for manufacturing of something then odds are they need a vector image. Its not so much about what they want. An ai file, pdf maybe a dxf or a svg should all be fine. Why? Well, the contractor wants 2 things Make his life easy Ensuring a satisfied client who pays the bill A jpeg file makes 1. work hard and 2. less likely. So he does the sane ...


1

I do not want to be rude, but really trying to help you to get your things done, and done right. I'm technophobe, cyberphobe. No. You want to be cheap. Reading this and the other question, You are trying to "save some dollars" but this will cost money to someone else. This is costing money to your contractor to find the font, recreate a poorly ...


0

Opinions: The original idea of bubbles was fine. The original 1st version was simple enough, the original 2nd and 3rd versions are too complex for this purpose, no matter how fine drawings they are. The problem in the original 1st version is the visibility of the business name. It should be the biggest item. The additional slogan can be smaller, but the ...


0

"Backgrounds" should really never be part of a logo. A logo should stand on its own without any "background". Traditionally logos are not "customized according to packaging" to any degree. There may be a few variations of a logo to accommodate usage, but any further degree of customization would be cumbersome and unwieldy. For ...


7

Simply opinion... I don't think color is your friend here. Not yet anyway. I think color may be distracting from the forms. I prefer to focus on the form first and deal with color later. If I focus on both color and form simultaneously, more often than not, the mark will suffer in one aspect. It's very easy to rebalance bad forms by using colors to correct ...


7

The little star at the start of the word is is a nice touch. Control the spacing between the letters. If you reduce it between some letters, the brand will look a bit more solid. You are relying TOO much on the outlines. When the logo is reduced in the size you have a problem. As you can see the additional text is NOT part of the logo. It is a description,...


1

Nice work! I love the white line from #1, makes the word "Brilliance" pop off the background a bit better. I would add that to the other designs. I prefer the bubble from #2 best, with #3 also really nice. But #3 probably needs a lighter background so the bubble pops out from it more: you want the company name to really jump out at the viewer. With ...


0

Colours are not harmonious, seem a bit randomly picked and also they are way outside the CMYK spectrum which is not ideal for printing. Bee seems to be in between about 4 graphic styles. Eyes look like from a manga, back wing looks like a calligraphy stroke gone wrong, head like clipart and front wing like a form made in ms paint. Also first look I thought ...


Top 50 recent answers are included