Hot answers tagged

96

Parallel Pens with special split nibs or something similar. Sorta like using two pens taped together into one pen with two tips An example can be found on the Scribblers calligraphy website:


26

Airphotos have been the source materials for a lot of maps for a long time. To result in a nice exact machine made look they would use dials to help draw the lines on transparent mylar sheets. The reason those maps had roads that were nice and parallel was the machines and skilled operators. Parallel Pens and parallel ruler are useful for other map making ...


21

Update (2020) So I just got an upvote on this and had an inkling that this might be a tad outdated and turns out it was. As far as I can tell the wizard in my previous answer (↓) has been scrapped and has been replaced with this new Styling Wizard. Here's a link to the API doc, if you want to read a bit more on the coding side of things. And some info ...


18

Assuming there isn't a reason why it has to be the Google-copyrighted maps you use, I'd use OpenStreetMap for this (the open source wikipedia-style Google Maps alternative). They're virtually identical but their license (Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike) explicitly allows this sort of thing including for commercial work, so long as they're credited ...


16

Start with a very loose idea: Marquee tool to quickly go over the High: Add your high color: If I press Cmd/Ctrl+Plataeu thumbnail on Layer Panel it will select it for me. Then do Select → Modify → Expand. I used 15 pixels. Notice the bottom of the Plateau and the Selection now have an offset to it: Create a layer beneath, color it, repeat. Use ...


13

There is always the parallel ruler for lines that are further apart. A more modern version would be those with rollers but that is not as good in accuracy as a fixed mechanical design.


11

I would do the following: Open the bitmap with a raster graphics editor like GIMP. Use a paint bucket tool to fill in the areas so you have solid black shapes, instead of outlines. Clean up any rough edges or gaps in your fill. Use Inkscape to trace the filled in version you just produced, and then delete the bitmap. Style the resulting path with a ...


8

Two other methods: Engineering drawings (e.g. highway plans) usually use curves with defined radii, so drawing those is mostly a matter of using a compass and creating the geometry from the same instructions for both sides. (Edit: I say "same instructions" because roads are first defined by their centerline path, then parallel stuff is based off of that. So ...


7

Get vector data You can download vector data from http://www.openstreetmap.org for free. Choose the region you need and choose 'share' (right side). Then select PDF and download. Recolor Artwork Open the PDF in Illustrator. Use Edit > Edit Color > Recolor Artwork. Trace the course To create a course (two continuing lines along the course): Create a ...


7

Mapmakers use embossing to create the effect from a height map. You can use the emboss filter on a image that represent your height field. If you must use photoshop for this then i would use the: Filter → render → Lighting Effect, rather than emboss. Start with a small white brush, with a very low flow on a black canvas then start drawing out the ...


6

Yes! - Appearance panel to the rescue. You can duplicate the existing stroke by dragging it to the 'new' or paper icon. Then just make the second stroke larger. See my example for you below.


6

If a blur effect is acceptable, duplicate the outline of the state, fill the shape with dark green, send to the bottom of the stack, apply a blur.


6

I agree, for the double line I would use pattern along path. For the waves, I would make an offset object of the coast line, fill it with some color, draw a couple waves of different length, and would use the spray tool (settings: without rotation or scaling, not spraying over transparent areas, not spraying over color boundaries) to put them into place. ...


5

If you'd rather start from scratch, you're talking about cartography with the difficult fact-finding and accuracy stuff cut out. It's not half as daunting a task as it initially looks - the key is in the preparation. Broadly speaking, a typical cartography workflow (minus the research and geolocation) is: Decide what details ('traits') you are including. ...


5

The software to use is Adobe Illustrator. A what I would do is: First of all create a list of cities and give each the desired size (before you start placing them on the map) Find a map with all the cities, paste it on your artboard and lock it there. Start to move your cities and order them around them map, always playing with kerning and the font size ...


5

At its heart, this is simply called "line art," and as DA01 states, halftone dots are really just a method to get a continuous tone (photograph etc) into line-art form for printing with a single ink. Map makers are usually free to choose the tones they use, but in some case, such as geological survey, the texture choices are formalized so as to represent ...


5

You can download the OpenStreetMap (OSM) data as svg files. Alternatively you can also download the raw data and generate a vector image if you need more control. There are many ways to do this, of different complexities and some of them are quite convoluted. However the simplest is to just click on the share icon in OSM web interface and download a ...


4

Open Vector Maps In addition to the great suggestions already mentioned take a look at http://openvectormaps.com. I created a library/directory of free, high quality city maps that are editable and layered. Choose from either .SVG or .AI file formats for use in Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape.


4

There are actually online tools that can do this. However, personally, I would start out with a google map screenshot and work from that - in Illustrator. You could take a round on the net and search for brushes and plugins for Illustrator that have ready-made map-elements. Here is but one example of what you can find: symbols ready made. Such as: These ...


4

While seconding Scott's "There's no magic button," what I did when I had to create city and country maps was to find an actual paper map, scan it, and trace it in Illustrator. That gave me a good realistic grid. From there I could simplify the map, pretty it up, tweak streets, add icons, etc. If you want the hand-drawn look, buy the paper map and use ...


4

These are all hand drawn/painted. You won't really find many tutorials on how to draw something as specific as a map. Just look for general drawing tutorials. It's honestly just a matter of picking up a pencil and start drawing it. There are no magic buttons or tutorials to draw something for you.


4

I have discovered another method which achieves the effect I was looking for far better than any other answer I've seen here. It has the added bonus of being 'non-destructive', meaning it can be changed or edited at any time, and does not effect the image beneath. It also very closely resembles satellite imagery of mountains. The drawbacks are that the ...


4

Use a Pattern Brush. Type your label and Convert to Outlines (brushes can't contain type). Drag your outlined type to the Brushes panel and choose Pattern Brush from the New Brush dialog. The text itself isn't editable (creating a new brush is quick enough though) but you can easily change the size, spacing etc. at any time by double clicking the brush in ...


4

Here's an example that uses an opacity mask to create the opening and the inner outline. I'm using a red background just to clearly set apart the other objects that will appear above the background. Create a white fill (no stroke) object. This will be the stand in for a region. Select the white object and copy/paste in front (Cmd-C, Cmd-F), two times. (The ...


4

It's not particularly a technology nor something exclusive to maps. It's essentially doing the same as your 'dots' method--which is screening back a solid color via a pattern. The only difference here is that instead of a dot pattern, they're using lines...what you could consider a modern form of hand-drawn line work referred to as hatching (or the more ...


4

If you'd prefer a fuzzy border inside the land's borders, rather than outside, try this... Create your vector land shape and give it a fill colour and no stroke Duplicate this land shape twice (press Ctrl + D twice) so that you have three copies. One copy will stay as the original land shape, one will create the border, and one will be used for clipping. ...


4

If you want a good product, work with a designer. You could spend hundreds of hours learning how to work with a program and how to optimize the workflow. Just imagine a designer asking how to start doing the backend of the game. Sure It can be done, but I am pretty sure you would think the same recommendation. Look for someone that already knows what needs ...


4

You could copy and paste a rectangular piece of the land from a larger piece of the land mass, create a path over it, and apply that as a vector mask, then add a stroke effect. For example Yes it is also possible to create a custom pattern in Photoshop, but I don't think that's how it was added to the map. Patterns repeat, but the example doesn't show that....


3

I've worked at CBC for a couple of years and there we used a software called Curious and the same company seems to have it called Viz World now.


3

I'd create pattern brush with any type of colors you want. For example, I created 3 rectangles and dropped them to brush panel choosing in popping up panel Pattern Brush. After that you can apply this pattern to any path you want whenever you want without adjusting weights, borders etc: ->


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