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Maintaining a padding within the original file is a good way to make sure every shape gets it’s appropriate margin. Especially when the icon is not symmetrical, simple centering can lead to unbalanced results. When looking at type, the same applies to kerning. While straight lines need more space between them, curvy shapes can remain closer together.


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I think you're right. Classically, inner margins are smaller than outer margins. However, you do need to ensure the inner margins are large enough to keep content out of the gutter. The reason outer margins are larger is due to creep. (which you can calculate). Creep is the slow outward movement of content due to the gutter and binding. Content will move ...


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Crop marks are automatically created during pdf export. You just gotta make sure you enable it in the export settings. Exporting can be found in: File > Export or Ctrl+E ( Cmd+E in mac ) When you are exporting a pdf, you gotta go to Marks and bleeds and select Crop marks. You may also need to select Use document bleed settings.


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There are a few rules of thumb, that i know of: gutter width ≈ line spacing gutter width ≈ width of »mii« Too much is a little bit less problematic than too little spacing between columns. These rules should be seen only as a starting point to a proper solution. Sources: Claudia Runk: Grundkurs Typografie und Layout. 2. Auflage. Galileo Press, Bonn ...


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By baseline, I'm assuming you mean leading or the baseline grid? ...Because the baseline on its own is just where the type sits, there's no measure that I can think of for a single baseline. If you take into account the gestalt principles of proximity, you would want the gutter to look larger than the leading so that people's eye flow to the next line in ...


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Neither. It's not measured from the descender or the baseline. Margins start from the bottom of the element (including any padding and border) regardless of what text is inside of this. You can see this yourself if you use your developer tools built into your browser (F12 or right click + inspect element). The only affect that text has on this is the total ...


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Hi Vincent and welcome! I think Tschichold's Canon works esthetically but yes, depending on your binding, you will have to add to the inner margin. It obviously depends on the kind of binding and also the amount of pages in your book. There are other canons like Van de Graaf and Rosarivo and Bringhurst also has a nice section about page proportions in his ...


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you can make the Bad baseline downshift choice, then select the text frame and press cmd+b, in the second panel choose fixed and change the measure in box (if you have preview activate you can see direct the result). Wrong: Right: English interface:


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Most print is optimised to have a certain amount of characters per line that reads well. Together with font size and leading, line length makes reading the text as easy as possible. When indenting both sides of a bullet list, you clip the line length quite a bit. There's two margins, and you need some space for the bullet character to sit in. This may ...


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No, there is no universal ratio or size for margin and padding. What looks harmonious in design A might be quite peculiar in design B. Off-key elements can be intentional design choices and the intention of the designer. So anything goes. That said... The common idea is that dissonance distract. Therefore most designs require margins and paddings that go ...


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You're asking whether there's a downside to doing what the engineer asked? I sure don't see one. If they make a request to make their job easier and faster, why would you not do that? Maybe you could include a very tiny padding, like one pixel. Or else do as she asks, and if any icons look bad, call it out at that point. When a co-worker asks something ...


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No rules, this is up to the designer. The 12.7mm is a default (not sure why really), however I have designed many printed items and always set custom margins. Many times I also used 10mm since I like to work with simple numbers. For a larger page count and if using "facing pages" you could consider a larger inner (inside) margin, for example make all sides ...


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There's no steadfast rule here. For me, things ultimately amount to visual perception. If the page "feels" cramped due to design elements, then factoring in the elements when considering margins will be beneficial. However if standard margins without considering design elements don't unnecessarily cause any visual "crowdedness" or confusion, then ignoring ...


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I don't know how you did format the text to look like it does in your first screenshot. If I use the paragraph effects defined in Scribus 1.5, I get this: I just had to check the "Auto-Indent" option. Looks like what you would expect. Personally, I'm still using the manual way (defining the indent and adding a tab) but I always do it in a style. If ...


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There is a way to achieve what you want, but it's a little tricky. Create a document with single pages (disable Facing Pages). Double-click the A-master in the Pages panel. Right-click the A-master in the Pages panel and select Master Options for "A-Master". Set Number of Pages to 2 and click OK. Select the left page of the master with the Page Tool. In the ...


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A minute or so of google-fu leads to: Text layout: 4cm binding margin 2cm head margin (top of page) 2.5cm fore-edge margin (the bit your thumb is against if you're riffling through the pages) 4cm tail margin (bottom of page) Print on one side of the paper. Use no less than 1.5 ...


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If you scale both shapes at the same time, they will stay the same relative distance to each-other. If you don't want the (relative) size of the strokes to change, Open the Transform Panel (Window → Transform or Shift+F8) and check Scale Strokes & Effects


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I'm not sure why this old thread was resurrected, but this may be a new feature since it was originally asked. In the Align panel, there is now a feature called Distribute Spacing. If you select 2 items, check off "Use Spacing" and enter an amount there, then click the distribute icon above for either horizontal or vertical, it will space those 2 elements ...


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This depends on the entire content you are working with, but, since your spread layout is tilted to the bottom right corner, I would find a way to also tilt the right hand side content. Optically, the text box on the right sits too close to the blue triangle. I would leave more white space up there, moving the text box either beneath the main headline on ...


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The height of an display is h(d) = d * cos( tan^-1 ( a / b)) Here, d = 55" is the diagonal of the screen in inches, and a = 1920 and b = 1080 are the horizontal and vertical number of pixels. tan^-1 is the inverse tangens or arctangens. You can use WolframAlpha to calculate this. h(55") = 26.96" h(65") = 31.87" Thus, you get your desired ratio by h(65") /...


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She could be needing the margin removed so she can fit the icons into a specific spot on her page, from there the engineer will be styling the page via CSS. Edit: presuming the phrase "style the page" means a webpage


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Resize to 20 pixels smaller in each direction first. Then expand canvas outwards to the desired size with white background showing


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You could open up 'Canvas size' (Alt + Ctrl/Cmd + C), select 'Pixels' as the unit of measure, and increase width and height by 20px (10px margin on all sides).


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The first and foremost rule of page layout is to forget the rules and do what looks best. Try for pleasing proportions and then take a ruler out when you want to put the actual measurements into the word-processing document values. As far as the top and bottom margin's concern, I use 1:1.62 (Golden Mean) proportions to start. Left and right margin are set ...


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There is no really "standard" margin for the hamburger's margins. It depends on the design and content. However, Google's material design guidelines (like the app you show in the question) recommends 16dp margins. The dp can be calculated using the following formula (pulled from the guidelines): dp = (width in pixels * 160) / screen density Ultimately ...


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Are you trying to print a document the same size as the paper you're printing on? The printer creates these margins so that it can feed the paper through the printer and ink will not print on either side of those margins. Unless your printer offers full-bleed printing or borderless printing. For example if I was printing an 11"x17" document with .125" bleed....


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The concept of a text baseline does not really exist in HTML and CSS. Margin is applied 'outside' the element. An element with text will be (usually) as big as the top of the ascenders down to the bottom of the descenders by default but also may be taller, as it is defined by the bounding 'box' of the individual glyphs in the font, which can be much larger ...


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Open your PDF in Adobe Acrobat, select Tools -> Pages -> Crop Then draw a rectangle around the content you want to keep Then double-click that rectangle Use this dialog to trim the white margins of your pages, then retrying printing.


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Off the top my head I'm pretty sure it's grouped as a guide so you can try command/alt + ; to toggle visibility.


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No, this is quite dependent on what you're trying to accomplish. Personally I try to remain with a minimum of 5px padding and 10px margin. But again its down to how you want the page to look. Sometimes padding will do the job of the margin if the background-color is to touch the neighboring element.. ..where-as the margin would push the two background-...


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