19

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


15

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


15

Some of these companies are very old family operated, some even tracing back to the second world war or before. Such 'static' companies that are not sold every 5 years to somebody else in the gulf don't need to update their branding every so often and they're not particularly interested in marketing their business. Transport is a long term solid business and ...


15

Consider folding your paper to create a brochure. image source (public domain) When your single sheet of paper is folded into a brochure, it is clear that there is more information inside it and on the back. People are used to brochures and know to look at all pages and sides. You get to highlight information based on its location: Front panel: very ...


14

Sometimes yes. It so happens that companies sometimes hedge their bets by selling products both in bulk to chains and as premium under their own brand. According to Tim Harford (The undercover economist page 51 second paragraph in particular) the reason for cheap look is to get most out of the customers money. By selling same product at a premium to not so ...


14

No, you don't. I believe that once you see a flyer in your hand, in your mailbox, under the door, etc, the general reaction is to at least flip it over and see if there's anything else on the back. Also, the way you layout the elements on the front can induce the idea that the content extends on the back. For instance, if its a product being sold, the ...


12

I think this is primarily an opinion-based question. Here's mine. Should I use my own name or have a business name for my services? Yes. In other words, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. It may matter to you personally, but not really in any legal or strategic way. Using your personal name may make it a tad harder to form a ...


10

People will naturally try flipping it over if they feel that they are looking at an incomplete part of a larger whole. Ideally, you'd like to take advantage of that -- you want the user to flip the flyer as a natural stage in their discovery process, rather than because they've been explicitly told (i.e. by an icon in the corner) to flip it over. This is the ...


9

De gustibus non est disputandum applies. What is tasteless, like what is humorous (or not), varies with culture, fashion, sensitivities and the prevailing political climate. It is also a personal matter, so my answer is personal. Like anyone, I have my own views on what is acceptable. This isn't a matter of being snobbish; it's that I want to hang onto my ...


9

Obviously the sharper the transition the better - but sometimes compromises are needed. I was working at an organisation that had this exact issue. They were large, very budget-conscious organisation with lots of very varied branded products with very varied stock turnaround, and a new brand that was maybe 40% similar to the old brand. They did it in a ...


9

"e-flier" is a bit of a nonsense term. It means nothing since electronic delivery can be done in so many various ways. If the client wants a file he can email to perspective people when requested, then a PDF is appropriate. You can embed video, audio, and other interactive elements in a PDF. How you generate the PDF really depends upon what software you ...


9

Just raising my rates seems very difficult It's pretty easy. Send out an email to your clients: As of day X my normal hourly rates for work will be increasing from Y to Z. You may lose a few clients, but eventually, you'll gain new ones that appreciate the work they're getting for the price. One reason clients start asking you for all the extras is ...


8

You never communicate that price is negotiable. Sorry. Its bad sales and marketing strategy. Rule #1 Never speak first. If they like your work then they'll either pay the rate or start negotiations and see how flexible you are. You can and should outline what the rate is for. In a bid you would say that this rate is for this exact work. That gives you ...


8

Part of your design should be based on how the brochure/flyer is presented. Will it be hanging on a wall? If so, it's not going to work well if double-sided. If the flyer is in a stack on a surface, one might get away with a less-than-perfectly aligned stack of paper, especially if a few of them are flipped to show the reverse side. Your idea of an arrow-...


7

I second Emilie in saying that everything will offend someone somewhere. Personally, I am pretty sick of people finding offence left right and centre. Some people are looking for things that will get their knickers in a twist, and as Alan so elegantly points out: pleasing everyone ends up in the bland, the invisible and - at best - mediocre work. And ...


7

That said is it bad to assume in re-branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Yes. I have found it a mistake to assume the preferred method of communication from any client. I have clients that I've never personally spoken to and everything is handled via email. I have clients who will send an email then call to see if I got ...


7

I think that in an ideal world you would dispose/recycle the old materials and rollout new ones at once but this isn't an ideal world. I would also say that there's actually three types of companies in this class: Mega corporations Large companies Small businesses I would imagine only the large companies would be able to afford to dispose of their ...


7

Clients expect my input and often leave me with little to nothing to work with so I'm doing basically their sales pitch in addition to their deliverables. This is your problem. Define in your scope of work what exactly you will provide and what exactly the client will provide. If the client is supposed to provide copy, spell out "Client will email a file ...


7

This question has TOP priority also in my mind and I made research for this a lot. Some other benefits: Using a Business name: It gives the opportunity to sell the business later if needed (of course if you know for 100% that you will not sell, then forget about this); Better because if your business doesn't go as you planned, for example, you get some bad ...


7

I responded to a similar question at Freelance.SE. I've actually run all 3 types over the years..... a business name, as myself, and as a business name which included my own name. The gist.... Using a business name: People tend to treat you as an "intern" or some random employee. I often find conversations, at least at the beginning, are very abrupt and ...


7

Blame the grid frameworks like 960.gs and Bootstrap. They made it very easy to build this exact layout: http://getbootstrap.com/examples/carousel/ These frameworks solved a lot of the problems of CSS layout, and made it easy for web developers / designers to create structured, grid based site that were comfortable, familiar and easy to use. Theme sites ...


6

To answer all the individual questions you posed: It depends. In other words, there's no hard and fast rules to this. But, in general, I'd suggest not trying to make the logo do too much. One of the more common mistakes for beginners is trying to make the logo literally describe the company. As your examples show, rarely is that actually what a great logo ...


6

I don't know if I'd call it a disconnect. This is a product of the desktop publishing era. Many small businesses (at least in the US) employ an in-house "marketing" person who does it all. They often learn graphics apps on the job or through some kind of on-line training. I've seen this first hand, coming in as a freelancer. One person who learns web and ...


6

I merely provide pricing and then add "If you have any questions or concerns, I'm always happy to to discuss them." If they take that to mean pricing, they can. It doesn't mean I'll alter pricing, but I want clients to feel free to bring up any topic related to the work.


6

Price is ALWAYS negotiable. But there's no advantage or reason that you need to remind anyone of that.


6

An excellent rule of thumb is to always have a logo and contact information on anything that can be shared individually. Realize people won't take a screenshot of your Facebook page and pass that around, but people might copy the image and pass that around. The only reasons the first image is better are because A) the text is actually readable and B) the ...


5

One way to breakdown and prioritise parts of the service you deliver, as well as leave it clearly open to negotiation, is using a MoSCoW analysis. Basically 'must haves', 'should haves', 'could have if there's time and space in the budget' and finally 'won't have this time but maybe in future'. Just use the must for basic necessities, should for mostly ...


5

It really depends on many factors, such as the industry the company is in, the reason behind the brand refresh and various others. Putting myself in the rather comfortable shoes of a CEO, I would immediately discount Option A for any company with a marketing budget less than at least $20 million, and even then writing it off would cost 5% of the budget. ...


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