16

Consider folding your paper to create a brochure. image source (public domain) When your single sheet of paper is folded into a brochure, it is clear that there is more information inside it and on the back. People are used to brochures and know to look at all pages and sides. You get to highlight information based on its location: Front panel: very ...


15

Some of these companies are very old family operated, some even tracing back to the second world war or before. Such 'static' companies that are not sold every 5 years to somebody else in the gulf don't need to update their branding every so often and they're not particularly interested in marketing their business. Transport is a long term solid business and ...


15

No, you don't. I believe that once you see a flyer in your hand, in your mailbox, under the door, etc, the general reaction is to at least flip it over and see if there's anything else on the back. Also, the way you layout the elements on the front can induce the idea that the content extends on the back. For instance, if its a product being sold, the ...


11

People will naturally try flipping it over if they feel that they are looking at an incomplete part of a larger whole. Ideally, you'd like to take advantage of that -- you want the user to flip the flyer as a natural stage in their discovery process, rather than because they've been explicitly told (i.e. by an icon in the corner) to flip it over. This is the ...


8

Part of your design should be based on how the brochure/flyer is presented. Will it be hanging on a wall? If so, it's not going to work well if double-sided. If the flyer is in a stack on a surface, one might get away with a less-than-perfectly aligned stack of paper, especially if a few of them are flipped to show the reverse side. Your idea of an arrow-...


4

I would suggest that the question here is more a matter of opinion than anything objective. To go through the list: "low readability, either due to the chosen typeface or backgrounds;" With the exception of the first example (text too small) and Waberer's (difficult to read typeface), they all look perfectly readable to be. But note that more than being ...


3

My best answer.... possibly. :) For most sales-oriented pieces, such as a flyer, one would use the content to promote discovery. There are subtle things within a design that can be done to try and entice the reader into "wanting more". These methods work for practically anything designed to "pull" readers. Sometimes they may require the design to be less-...


3

Not only the design, also the material on which it is printed is used as long as possible. In contrast to marketing consumer products, there is not much money left to waste on unnecessary expenses.


3

Most rebranding is just shown when it happens. Unless clients have a specific interest in this information and need to somehow participate in the process, this should not be of interest to clients before it happens. However, there might be specific business reasons for shareholders and people involved in running the company in having this announced ...


2

From the experience of the person working for the company making the tarpaulin (among other things printed on those type of materials): I was responsible for the graphic of those “other” prints. For the tarpaulin it was the printer who created the graphic. They usually get the project delivered by the client in some form (typically Word or clipart). Because ...


2

Left one Why I prefer the left.... It's clear in message placement is interesting at a glance (because it's not all centered) The concept of a magnifying glass and search is instantly perceived What I'd do to alter the left one... Consider placement a bit more. There doesn't seem to be any direct thought as to why elements are placed where they are. By ...


1

The one on the right definitely, but needs more tweaking I'd say: remove the eyes from the OO, there is too much information already and you may have heard this before, but simple things are generally better make every font bolder and in the same weight and also the circle having the same weight just a random example of how everything looks optically ...


1

That is rather marketing decision than graphic design. And you won't get a solid conclusion. Some companies might want to announce rebranding. Allowing customer to adjust to change, this assume that customers use is so periodicall that the gap beetwen must be filled with remainder (and it's not the only reason). Some companies might want to make an event ...


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