44

Well, the thing is you don't need a whole lot of things in the world. Some food, water, shelter, and that's about it. So you definitely don't need maths, it goes into the same category as you don't need a car either. (In fact, contrary to what others have you believe you don't need money, you can live off the state's generosity in almost every prison known ...


28

High pass is the opposite of gaussian blur If you take an image and blur it you only keep the "low frequencies". High pass makes the opposite, it only lets the "high frequencies" pass, or what most people call "the details". Any image can be deconstructed into these two components. Have you used unsharp mask to sharpen an image? That filter is actually ...


28

Disclaimer: I use questions answered by me as an example for the plain reason that I am familiar with them. As I am almost a professional mathematician┬╣, I hope that my perspective adds to the existing answers. I use graphic design mainly for scientific illustrations and for hobby purposes. When graphic designing, there are essentially three ways in which I ...


10

I studied engineering a couple of years before I swiched to graphic design. There are a lot of differences in the use of mathematics between the two disciplines. You need mathematics? Yes, everyone needs some. What do you need: A lot of logical thinking. You need to think in proportions, percentages, the Rule of Three, conversion of units. Basic ...


9

Amazing answers. I just wanted to add something that has not been mentioned and is essential for a graphic designer: a practical knowledge of probability theory and statistic tools. Notice I qualify it as a "practical knowledge". By this I mean you need to know how to apply probability and statistical tools, not the heavy theory behind them. Without this ...


7

A high pass filter is a fitter that removes low frequency information form a singnal. Now there are many ways to implement a high pass filter, but photoshops high pass filter most likely is the result by subtracting the blurred image from the original (as mentioned by @filip). Simply all of image minus the low frequency is just the high frequency. Now if ...


6

Simply put, math is a tool like any other. If you lack the skill to use the tool, you can make fewer things. So I would judge it in the exact same way. If you can't sketch you will be limited in your work that way, and the same goes for math, as illustrated by @joojaa in his answer about geometry. We all lack in some aspect and it won't stop you from ...


6

As you probably have guessed and at least one long time member has confirmed, Inkscape can be used to make also geometry illustrations. But you have no easy way to input formulas for wanted 3D shapes which you want to see rendered as 2D drawings. Only XY plane shapes can be inputted as parametric curves. Images of 3D compositions must be drawn manually or ...


5

None of the answers so far have touched on the maths behind the filter. Here's a detailed writeup from which I quote: Frequency filters process an image in the frequency domain. The image is Fourier transformed, multiplied with the filter function and then re-transformed into the spatial domain. Attenuating high frequencies results in a smoother image in ...


4

What your essentially asking is a special case of kerning. Systems that do automatic kerning have been done. This is called optical kerning in inDesign, you can find a few other companies have made their own tools. While its true that manual kerning make for better results in many cases than optical kerning there are situations where anything better than ...


4

Very good answers in here. As a graphic designer for 20+ years, here are a few of the more practical, every day uses for math (loosely defined) in design that I've needed: Knowing the decimal equivalent of fractions, and vice-versa. Ability to quickly calculate dimensions, for paper size, folds, die cuts, etc. Basic knowledge of geometry for angles, arcs, ...


4

You need to split the circle into separate objects, then color the separate objects. You can't fill a circle with multiple colors other than using gradients or gradient meshes. The easiest way to spit the circle and color, is to simply draw paths to divide the circle then use the Live Paint Tool to apply color to the separate areas. Expand the Live Paint ...


3

Let me preface this and say that GD.SE is not a site for basic software education or tutorials. The process for creating your example involves a lot of steps. I have briefly went over the process but there are plenty of tutorials that go indepth for each part. Top Curved Shape Choose the Pen tool (p). Start at the left side and make a point. Move to the ...


3

But LaTeX does use math fonts with mathematical symbols. But just using math fonts isn't enough to typeset math. The other answer talks about 200-400 characters. LaTeX easily needs more. For instance, there's a package to use Times and matching math fonts: its glyph table lists around 8 * 128 glyphs for math support (not counting the "used with the varg ...


3

If you start with the disc in the middle, you know its radius in pixels: R_red. The area A of the disc is A=pi*R_red**2. A is also the area of the green and blue area, respectively. Therefore, the outer radius of the green ring belongs to a disc with area 2*A. R_green = sqrt(2*A/pi)), and consequently R_blue=sqrt(3*A/pi)). So, R_green is sqrt(2) ...


3

Some one did ask a similar question on Mathematics SE -> How to divide a circle into 9 rings / 1 inner circle with the same area? You will have to adjust the equation a bit.


3

Type designer Hermann Zapf created a typeface specifically for this purpose: AMS Euler. I guess it is both easily comprehensible and readable, if it is also beautiful to look at, you will have to decide for yourself. Read more about it on the Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMS_Euler


3

You must know the centerpoint of the circle. Otherwise there's infinite number of possible circles common for A and B. Think the points as complex numbers A=x1+iY1, B=x2+iY2. In the same way let the centerpoint of the circle be C=x3+iy3 radius B-C = (A-C)exp(iD) where D=the needed rotation from A to B in radians. Thus you calculate (B-C)/(A-C), convert the ...


2

The (La)TeX community does more math fonts than most, and most of their stuff is freely available (opensource). With the transition to OpenType, platform is pretty much irrelevant: Lucida: https://tug.org/store/lucida/opentype.html Stix: http://www.stixfonts.com/ --- see also: http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/stix/ Euler: https://github.com/khaledhosny/...


2

Rounding error at low pixel rates Especially when drawing in the low pixel range there always is a considerable rounding error which then will become visible. In the example below I drawed a circle with 4 px radius (grey), a rectangle with 4 px radius reounded corners (black), and a rectancle where the rounded corners were manually made from circles with a 4 ...


2

Okay I did some digging and it sounds like the company is in fact out of business. Here are a few alternatives people have suggested: http://www.gaehrken.de/tex/ http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/utopia/ http://www.tug.dk/FontCatalogue/utopia-md/ If those won't work the only thing it appears might get the original Baskerville Math Font is contacting Michael ...


2

Assuming that you've drawn the circles and lines using the Ellipse and Line Segment tools (or the Pen, etc.), the colouring is relatively simple using the Live Paint Bucket or the Live Paint Selection Tool (Illustrator CS4 and newer). These tools require that the shapes and lines are not grouped or placed in different layers (if they are grouped, ungroup ...


2

It is bit of everything combined. Most users do not need a font that covers all the possible use cases. Typing text is much more common than doing mathematical notation, thus a widely useful font only requires a few hundreds glyphs to share. So for the average western European it takes about 50 characterss for most tasks. By doing 200, you can cover 95% of ...


2

I personally like to use LibreOffice Draw. It's not quite as advanced as something like Illustrator, but it's easy to use, and it offers important basics such as grids and individual vertex manipulation. Here's some examples I did with it: (only the logo of the second, not the background)


2

Yes it's certainly possible with LibreOffice. In LibreOffice Writer, click Insert > Object > Formula In the window that opens at the bottom type in the formula as follows %PI^1_1 Here's a screen shot LibreOffice also comes with a separate Math application, which can also be used to create formulas. There's further documentation here on the using ...


2

typography itself has its rules to balance the types, ascendents, descendents, width, height, center, etc. balancing text is kinda about grasping the right spot to use as your reference frame for balancing. As in: if you're gonna use the center, the border, a special midpoint of the type, etc.


2

Your surface already has a 2D parametrisation, also known as a uv map. So all you really need to do is drop the function into any 3D app out there assign the texture on the surface and render. For practical purposes it may be good to use something like Mathematica see this manual entry (last basic entry is the same case just different parametric surface). ...


2

Try the Character Palette If you can insert it via the OS X character palette, you're good. Other than that, I'm not aware of any math plug-ins for Sketch. Roll your own One of Sketch's most lovable features is that you can write plug-ins to do most of what you can dream up. Given math symbol support at the OS level, it seems feasible that a UI could be ...


2

The utility Grapher on Mac OS can handle analyzing and displaying most of this sort of stuff out-of-the-box, but as the easiest output is then raster instead of vector, I agree with the earlier post by @2287001 that Scilab is a high powered tool which would get you a lot of what you need. Also worth mentioning GeoGebra 3D, an online 3D grapher, which will ...


2

Select the inline graphic by highlighting it, right click it, and choose Properties Click the Text tab, then Advanced Settings tab, then change the Baseline Offset setting to a negative value.


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