7

Because that's the best, most reliable, format for Office. If you're saving something for Office, chances are it is not going to be commercially printed. In that case, 150ppi is plenty for most home/office inkjet printers. In addition, only an RGB image is needed. Of the standard RGB formats, PNG24 supports transparency the best. So, 150ppi, RGB, ...


4

All of these are potentially good points if they're backed up by a valid design reason (as opposed to a personal preference or opinion). I always caution against fixed ideas that might not apply in every circumstance. For long documents, readability, invisibility (making the typography unnoticeable), clarity (chapters, headings, subheads and text clearly ...


4

You cannot, in general, copy the exact same feature behavior from one program into another. Tinkering with settings can sometimes lead to a similar result, but not in this case! InDesign's justification algorithm is influenced by both Donald Knuth's "optimal spacing" as implemented in TeX, and Hermann Zapf's hz-program. It finds the optimal line breaking ...


3

The best way to use graphics for MS office tools is .WMF or .EMF formats. These formats truly supports and gives the freedom to re-edit it in MS office itself. Try to use this by exporting from any Vector tools like Coreldraw or Adobe Illustrator.


3

Typically this is called an accordion effect, but Word still doesn't seem to have them out of box. However, you could achieve this effect in Word 2013 using collapsible headings.


3

moved from comment Microsoft products are notoriously bad where color is concerned. Their support may have been less than forthcoming. You do NOT want to alter Apple profiles to fix some Microsoft Office issue. Everything in Office uses RGB color. RGB has a habit of changing values based upon which computer is opening the document. You simply can't control ...


2

Set up your header and/or footer as desired. Insert a Continuous break on the first line of the document. Create the remainder of your document as desired. Protect the document as a form, making sure that the first section (the part before your Continuous break) is the only section that is protected. Save your document.


2

There are really only 3 solutions.... Client purchases and learns the software you use (InDesign, Illustrator, etc) - Watch font licenses here. You can't legally just give clients fonts you use in many instances.Therefore the client will also need to purchase font licenses for themselves. - In addition, I charge for native files. So there is that added cost ...


2

If by DataStream you mean XML file then the answer is yes, as long as we speak about text. Illustrations are a different subject. The first thing to decide about is network protocol(s) and server. On one hand server should support protocol allowing your OS to incorporate stored documents into your filesystem. In other words, InDesign should allow you to ...


2

Beware, what you're asking about is purely opinion-based, which is rather against the principles of this stackexchange. Flush-left since MS Word doesn't allow the kind of hyphenation/justification adjustments that would eliminate rivers for fully justified text. Bad. Justified text is good as long as people use proper paragraph and sentences that don'...


2

You want to use a technique called Data Merging. In Microsoft Office products there are two options: Mail Merge Catalog Merge Then you'll want to pay special attention, and learn how to Merging Pictures. Essentially, you'll be using your spreadsheet but might need to create a new one (to not ruin your original) and get the formatting right. Typically ...


2

MS Word isn't the best choise to write long documents, I would prefer LaTeX or InDesign. The main reason for this is that in Word the algorithm for justification and hyphenation is not the best. LaTeX and InDesign do not have this problems. To get a readable document in MS Word the user must know a lot of typography (LaTeX not, the build in typography is ...


2

The best solution I found so far is a combination of options 2 (buy fonts individually) and 4 (find free alternatives). I suspect (but haven't confirmed) that current MS Office doesn't include all those fonts (option 1), and that there are no such font packages available (option 3). The details differ for each font: Palatino (or some variation of it) is ...


2

What file format are you using? MS Office products prefer PNG files over all others, even if they aren't using a transparent background. Try saving out as PNG, if you aren't already. I actually think Adobe 1998 is a more widely-used standard for non-Mac, and non-design workflows. It's become much less of an issue over the years, but clearly you're still ...


2

First you have to understand that there may not be an answer to your question in the way you envision it. See a color and numeric value of the color are different things. The numeric value is a device specific instruction, it is literally a different color on every device out there. Therefore to talking about matching color between two applications is ...


2

If the email footer is embedded in through individual user Microsoft Outlook preference panel the user has a setting that can render the quality of the image you are placing. The following link describes the problem and the solution to fix this issue by using an image editor - Outlook blurry or fuzzy images Hope this helps Another way around is to get your ...


2

That's the expected behavior of a break in Word. Breaks are treated like character, and move with the text. You actually see the location of the break by pressing Ctrl + Shift + *. What you are trying to do—having a different header for first page—is actually built into the header footer settings. Double click in the header to edit it. In the ...


2

MS Office users can live without quides. They can switch on the grid that has easily customizable horizontal and vertical spacings. Alternatively they can easily draw colored lines that can be used as quides and deleted when not any more needed. This would be impractical in Photoshop because every line needs a layer and some coloring, too. In Office: ...


2

The font American Scribe is made to resemble the handwriting in the constitution, and in fact P22 Declaration was conceived to be an absolute copy, including the sizes etc. The problem is both of those are commercial fonts, and I understand that budget is a concern. The good news is that US Declaration (see below) is free (like speech I guess haha) So I ...


1

A better way to do this, which doesn't involve 'teaching your client', is to add empty text boxes (no fill, no line) into the header and footer on p1. Make these boxes the full height you want for the larger header & footer, then move the vertical margin bars to where you need them for the smaller p2 header & footer. On p1, the body text will not go ...


1

I just ran into this problem myself. As Scribblemacher says, the size of the header is fixed within each section. So, in order to define different header sizes for the first page vs. subsequent pages, you will want to insert Section break. After that, put your cursor in the header pane for Section 2 (make sure that you have correctly created a new ...


1

The continuation sheets which I've worked on have primarily only had a reduced header, like the one you describe, and no footer at all. It depends on what the client wants, but I wouldn't be opposed to a discreet footer with just the address and phone (in case the pages get separated). You don't need all the information from the front page, but some ...


1

Same problem for me. I use Inkscape to draw and coworkers integrate them in Microsoft Office documents. PDF conversion is ugly, coworkers say it's Inkscape fault (of course!). The solution : In Inkscape, save your file as *.emf, and use this file in Microsoft Office, pdf will be beautiful.


1

Three ideas here: 1) Don't use word I am asuming you are using word as a midle step fo generate a pdf. So if that is the case don't use it. Word is a realy bad option to handle raster images. It process the inserted images compressing them and resampling them. Instead Save a copy of your work directly as pdf. File > Save as > Choose pdf as the output ...


1

Word is a bit quirky. In anycase you can get perfect quality pictures from word. There are 2 options as I see it. If you have a PostScript printer then you can embed EPS with all photoshop print goodies like color correction and priner calibrations. For this to work: both your printer and monitor need to be profiled, or better yet calibrated. Otherwise ...


1

It's normal that the colors on the screen are always brighter than the ones on paper. There's also other factors like the type of paper you use and the printer itself. And as it was mentioned in the other answers, Microsoft Words is a text editing software and doesn't have much accuracy for color management. I don't know with the new versions of Words but it'...


1

I'm not a Microsoft Word expert but the text stylesheet I use are in the "Toolbox", and if you click on each style, you will see that you can add it to the template. My screenshot is with the "legacy" style (I prefer it) but I guess you can figure out where that toolbox on the recent interface instead!


1

In Word, it is not possible to use Fill to change an imported image's color like you can with Word's native shapes, BUT you can tint them to more than just a handful of colors. Note: There's a discrepancy between the "Format Picture" sidebar (where there are only a handful of recolor options, as you've mentioned), and the similarly named "Picture Format" tab ...


1

Set up a Cell Style with the options you want, if you don't already have one created.... Then Double click the default [Basic Table] Style in that panel. Set the appropriate rows to use your Cell Style: Then when you import the Excel table, be certain to check the Import Options item and set the import to use the Basic Table style. Caveat: In many cases ...


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