12

I realize that this answer is coming long after the question was asked, but hopefully, it will help somebody someday... What you can simply do is duplicate the original slide, and place your animated gif ONLY in the second slide. The second slide will appear on a click (anywhere), and the gif will automatically begin playing as that second slide is loaded. ...


11

I've never run into this before, but I did once interview with a firm who asked me to create a PPT on the fly for them during an interview. Maybe they want to see how you construct the work, how you set up animations, etc. I personally have encountered lots of beautifully designed InDesign documents that were difficult, if not impossible to reuse. The ...


11

You can! If you cheat a little... You can make a copy of the chart and enlarge it so it covers all the slide. Then you can change de colors of the copy, to make it more lighter. The trick it's to center both charts so they have the same center point. I have made a sample to show what I mean....


6

Unless your client has explicitly specified a format, you're essentially wide open re: what file format you use. That being said, it's usually best to go with something that is widely recognized/supported, so PPT(X) or PDF is likely the way forward. Your client might be confused if they're expecting a PPT(X) and receive an EXE (self-contained slideshow), for ...


6

You can't. This is —most probably— not an automated effect, this graphic has been designed by hand. In order to find the similar colours, you'd need to dive into colour theory and find out about the HSB / HSV colour model to make lighter shades of a given colour. To make the actual background shapes, you'd have to make those manually in ...


5

As others have suggested in the comments, there might be some phantom traces of Adobe Gothic somewhere in the presentation. You may be able to remove them using the Font Replacement dialog: Go to Home on the ribbon, and in the Editing group click the little triangle next to Replace and select Replace Fonts.... You will then see a dialog box with all of the ...


5

"Presentation" and "Pitch Deck" both mean a slideshow. The most common types are PowerPoint and Google slides, but there are many more presentation programs. I think a PPT file is clunky as a deliverable; it contains the original, editable slides along with the slideshow, and it takes several steps to start the slideshow. Unless your client wants to be ...


5

I've been having a lot of difficulty finding documentation on this myself, so wanted to share the results of my experiments. I would rate my C4D skills as maybe a 4 out of 10, and I've been fumbling in the dark when it comes to bringing 3D models into PPT, so this information may not be 100% accurate. I've gotten the best results exporting to .FBX, with all ...


5

There's a way using a PowerPoint VBA Macro, as all shape objects can be manipulated from there. Below is some sample code that asks for the starting and finishing angle, and creates a partial circle shape sized accordingly. Sub create() Dim startAngle As Double, finishAngle As Double 'Ask the user for values for Start and Finish angles ...


4

Steer clear of the original "safe" fonts: Verdana, Arial, Times, Tahoma, whatever. There are more flexible fonts available now, designed for today's quality display panels. Work smarter and start using Google presentations (via Drive), where you have access to the myriad fonts available on Google fonts. Not only do you get a reliable set of awesome fonts, ...


4

If your powerpoint file is an .pptx you can try this: Rename your samplename.pptx into samplename.zip. Open the zip-file and check all subfolders if there is a pic in it. Hopefully it has its original name. Yes, new powerpoint standard (.pptx) is a zip-file containing xml-files and others.


4

These red dots are called "connection points". I don't know of any way to disable them, but you can override them by holding Alt while you draw.


4

Creating PPT shapes in Illustrator. I do this practically everyday: Create shape in Illustrator, export as .emf from Illustrator. PLACE .emf into PowerPoint. Ungroup .emf. (Answer "Yes" to "do you want to convert to a MS Office drawing object") UNGROUP AGAIN. This reveals an invisible bounding bound on top of your shape. Select the invisible bounding ...


4

If the presentation needs to be done in Powerpoint, I wouldn't try to use a different platform. As you mentioned, your client might want to change things, so the format should be a popular and easy to edit one. Since re-usability seems to be an important point here, I would consider preparing a Powerpoint template for your client. A template contains ...


4

There are a couple of ways to achieve the effect that you are looking for: Add an extra 20 copies of the final frame of the shorter animation to the end of that GIF so that both GIFs have the same number of frames. Change the timing of the last frame in the shorter animation so that it is 21 times the length of all the other frames. How you do that will ...


4

It's not a single click job. The result resembles something which can be made in general purpose graphic programs with a little more than doing something most trivial. In Powerpoint that's reflected as numerous formatting selections. In this case you must make the right Bevel selections. The rectangular shapes have also shadows. And, of course, every item ...


3

Mainly, it depends on the final destination of the presentation, and who will have control over presenting it. That is to say, if only you will be presenting it, and will have control over the viewing device, the choice is yours (although 16:9 gives you more real estate, and is, in fact, the more contemporary proportion). If you will be sending the .ppt/....


3

You will have to make sure you're using the right font type in PowerPoint as not all font types can be embedded. Note You can embed any TrueType font that is included with Microsoft Windows. Other TrueType fonts can be embedded if they do not have license restrictions. Other font types will not embed - How to embed fonts in PowerPoint


3

I don't think there's a direct way. The only method I'm aware of is to select the image and choose Format > Picture... and look at the Alt Text field, specifically the Description. PPT seems to insert the name of the file (without a suffix) as the alt text description. At least in PPT 14.4.8 on the Mac, this is the only location of the actual file name. ...


3

There is no way to convert a PSD, into a PowerPoint. What you do is you export your graphics assets as PNG to use in PowerPoint. Try to actually bring assets such as logos as fonts if possible. Consider that vector content does not always work so well in PP unless it was created in PP*. It is better if you do most of the designing in PowerPoint itself. ...


3

The scriptmasters probably would write it in Sanskrit, but the rest of us must try something simpler. Here's one possiblity: Draw a curve with the paper color. Add a shadow effect to it Send the curve to the background


3

There are a couple of options that you can use. Turn on "View Ruler" (View/Show/Ruler). In addition to the rulers, you will also now see a vertical and horizontal dashed line centered on the slide. These are guidelines, and you can drag them anywhere on the slide you want. To add a new line, place your cursor on whichever line you want to duplicate (...


3

In most cases, you can't easily use anything they are providing. There's no easy conversion given the files you were provided. Powerpoint does not directly transfer to InDesign, in addition Powerpoint typically uses low resolution RGB images. If the PDF was generated from PowerPoint, then odds are the PDF will also have issues with commercial printing. ...


3

To make the interweaved appearance you can divide some shapes to 2 parts: Divided shapes can occur in different levels in the stack. Powerpoint has very poor control for colorings. Your example has carefully adjusted gradient fills to make some 3D appearace. My old Powerpoint doesn't have arbitary gradient fill tools, but there's in the fill effects ...


3

It seems the best workflow is as mentioned by Billy Kerr in comments: Export from Cinema 4D to one of Paint 3D supported formats (3MF, FBX, STL, PLY, OBJ, and GLB) and make any adjustments in Paint 3D (probably materials and light), then export again to Powerpoint as 3MF, OBJ, FBX, PLY, STL or GLB. Check which format produces less issues. More info here.


3

You have already got a suggestion to make a PDF. Illustrator opens and edits PDFs, so at least it works. An unfortunate thing with PDFs is that there can be numerous clipping masks which must be released + deleted and groupings which must be ungrouped. Another possibility is to save the presentation as *.emf (=Enhanced Windows Metafile). Each slide of a ...


2

1280px wide by 720px tall is generally a good size, especially if it will be displayed on an HDTV.


2

I'm fairly certain that Powerpoint Artistic Effects are designed for bitmap images only, whereas shapes will be a vector based format. Other than saving out the shapes as bitmaps and re-importing them like you suggested, I don't think this will be achievable.


2

You can create an oval and add text to it. This will break the text at the edges of the oval. Next you can apply the warp operation Inflate to it. It's not as nice as your rendered output and would not fit my understanding of aesthetics, but it's "something like this".


2

I have seen a lot of presentations created using Prezi that have this sort of functionality. Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that transforms presentations from monologues into conversations: enabling people to see, understand, and remember ideas. To understand complexity, one must zoom out to see the big picture and in to see the details. Prezi’s 3-...


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