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17

There are many attributes that define how good a monitor is, but the most important ones for graphics work tend to be: Colour accuracy Gamut Contrast There are others (e.g. response time, refresh, etc. that tend to be relevant more for gamers). IPS is frequently preferred by graphics professionals because it has superior colour accuracy and contrast to TN ...


15

You have to be a little careful with the definitions. 24 bit per pixel and 32 bit per pixel “24 bit” usually means 24 bits total per pixel, with 8 bits per channel for red, green and blue, or 16,777,216 total colours. This is sometimes referred to as 24 bit RGB. “32 bit” also usually means 32 bits total per pixel, and 8 bits per channel, with an ...


12

Regarding the question I reset both of the monitors to their factory defaults, but still, the issue persists. This does not help at all. The basic configuration is not on the monitor but in the graphics card that sends the signal to them. For web could be enough, but for photography or print, you need special hardware. There are some brands, for example, ...


10

You can not compensate. Obsessing about the perfect hue is largely irrelevant for most audiences. All you can really do is make your part and use a monitor that is calibrated or emulating sRGB. Average user does not really have a choice on the color they are displayed. They can have bad, cheap, damaged or old panels. Since the color effects are global no ...


9

Yes, some people (if not most) will definitely see your colors differently. And this is why we use calibrated displays when doing work for print because we can dominate the medium. Now most people will most likely see what your less expensive monitors show you (especially if its a wide gamut color monitor and not calibrated to sRGB!). To harmonize colors ...


7

There's actual studies on this: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/08/technology/for-multitaskers-multiple-monitors-improve-office-efficiency.html?pagewanted=all There's lots of reasons why having more screens can be a benefit to people. Brendan included several. One not mentioned is that the monitors that you can change the orientation to vertical (portrait) ...


6

I use three 17s at work and a single 22 at home (laptop is usually closed under the desk). I'm not sure what you're running, but I find that in most cases a bigger monitor with Spaces on the Mac is just as good as a multiple monitor setup. Your eye can really only look at one monitor anyways, and having Ctrl + left and right as options is only a touch slower ...


5

Any monitor worth the buying price will have a basic ICC color profile which should be downloadable from the manufacturer's website. (True of any device that produces visual output, including printers.) Usually the profile comes on a CD, which seldom escapes from its sleeve, so that the profile never makes it onto the computer. Worse, an ICC profile for the ...


5

I could not manage without a second monitor. I do a lot of production work, and I am constantly flipping between the Adobe and Microsquish suites, with email in the corner. One screen slows me down painfully. But it's a matter of workflow. If your screen is large enough to fit everything comfortably, or you don't mind tabbing, you're fine.


4

I honestly wouldn't worry about colour accuracy for web. Every person in the planet will see the site in a different shade (so to say). One thing is using web safe colours, that will actually make a difference if you have, for example, overlapping layers (like a non-transparent image on the same colour background). But a website will be seen in anything from ...


4

I use 3 monitors (2-30" and 1-27"). I've become so accustomed to this configuration that trying to work on anything less can actually be a hinderance. Although, it's not crippling by any means. I simply work slower with two monitors and even slower still with a single screen. I'm a Mac user, and I do not use the application frame Adobe implemented in recent ...


4

I would love to have 2 monitors at work. I don't do any coding but I do lots of stock images, have to look back and forth at either an e-mail or a company's website when doing an advertisement, look in our database of contact information. A lot of times I end up printing stuff out just so I can see it all while doing the design. Then when we lay books out ...


4

It makes minimal difference in terms of distortion. Unless you do a lot of perspective correction for architectural shots and the like I wouldn't worry about that at all. If you work on critical work though you might want to make sure it is an IPS Panel with AdobeRGB, I don't believe Samsung makes any that are. If you don't work on highly color critical ...


4

Since screen technologies (contains phosphor that gets older), resolutions and configurations are so much different, that's a problem we simply cannot solve completely. If you have personal contact with customers, explain them how to calibrate their screen. And other tips here (help.adobe.com) How I faced this problem before (yes, I know it's very ...


3

It is impossible for the monitor to show things outside your color range. So you either show the closest color in your range or something else. If you draw a graph then the colors you draw on the graph can be scaled to your space. You still dont see those colors on the monitor offcourse, that would be impossible. So the colors you see in the graph represent ...


3

I think what you're referring to is the pixel density and not the resolution (even though they're related). The pixel density can be measured by counting the number of pixels in one inch. Whereas a screen resolution is the number of pixels that a screen can fit in each dimention (horizontal and vertical). On devices with high pixel density, the browser ...


3

This is a pretty long question and I also believe that it is one that could receive several different, opinionated answers. That being said, I'll answer this accordingly, with my opinion and the way I have always worked with dual monitors. Working with two monitors, it's almost inevitable that you will wind up using one as a primary and one as a secondary ...


3

If you're planning to do printing and packaging, you should necessarily get a Spyder5PRO or Spyder5ELITE, as the EXPRESS version won't compensate the ambient light of your room with its ambient light sensor. This is important as the contrast will be adjusted correctly for your working room. Additionally, ensure that you have a constant, darkened room light ...


3

Yes you should calibrate, always. As for what calibration hardware to use, that's largely a matter of preferences. But any calibration hardware is better than none. You really can't go terribly wrong with any of them. I use the Xrite i1, but that's just my preference.


2

The answer is yes. It is also no at the same time. See a monitor is not able to show all the colors humans can sense. Since humans certainly can sometimes see differences between the colors of the 8bit per color palette it means more could be useful. But if you extend the color range and dynamics then you also need to boost the resolution of the color ...


2

I don't do print design Then it doesn't really matter. Since no matter what you do to your monitors, there's no correlation to what everyone else does to their own monitors. As such, I'd say, set it the way you like. Whether that means they are the same or different is really up to you.


2

A pixel is a point sample. A point sample has no size (read a pixel is not a sqare3). The pitch between samples on a digital display device unspecified. When you make a image 800 pixels wide you get a randomly large image. The technical reason is that: Images degrade on anything but 1 pixel = 1 pixel ratio. Beyond this the operating system does not even ...


2

None. What can be making you confuse is that RGB color spaces are defined by three chromaticities of the red, green, and blue additive primaries, and can produce any chromaticity that is the triangle defined by those primary colors. So, given enough color spaces I suppose you can cover the entirety of CIE XYZ. And so different monitors cover different RGB ...


2

In the end, I had to uninstall and install Adobe InDesign. After that, the issue with the colours is gone.


2

We cannot write here something like "Buy Delsungcer 1234 A7, it's the best!!!!!" because only an idiot would believe it and we generally have no intention to push brands. You have two reasonable possiblities. Buy the best you can afford or the cheapest which does the least acceptable minimum of the job. The size: How old you are? Only 20? then you can ...


2

Today, everything destined for the web is best in sRGB. Sure that may change, but it won't next week, month or even year probably. Why? Because most (if not all) displays are set to use sRGB by default from the factory and 95% of users don't know how to alter it and in all probability even if they do... don't care to alter it -- especially merely for your ...


1

No. Unfortunately. The bigger iPad Pro has a really fast connection to your computer. But nobody has seen fit to exploit this for its obvious ability to create a lag free input device for desktop software. Part of this is Apple's fault, they don't make it easy to achieve, on purpose, for reasons probably to do with product line differentiation and a "we ...


1

A pixel is not a fixed size. 800 pixels on one monitor will be a completely different size to 800 pixels on another monitor. There is no way around that, it's just how screens work. If you really need to see things at close to actual size (assuming you're working in physical units) you could do some calculation and view your image at the correct size, but ...


1

Wacon Intuos Pro at least can be configured so that by pressing a button on the tablet you can move between screens. This in many ways better than even having a very wide touch area for the whole two screens: you can move between screens much faster for example.


1

Some of this is subjective, but if you want to make sure you don't cross the line into having text which risks being unreadable, you can use the W3C's AA or AAA accessibility guidelines. The easy way to do this is by plugging the colours you use into a tool like snook.ca's colour contrast checker. According to that, the colours used on the 'grey on grey' ...


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