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38

They are file formats for storing font information. TrueType was invented by Apple as a competition to Adobe's PostScript Type1. Both TrueType and PostScript fonts became the standard file formats for fonts for the past 3 decades or so of desktop publishing. In terms of your average designer, the differences between the two are relatively unimportant. ...


13

Adobe offers some great reading on type formats: See Adobe explanations here Excerpts from the link: WHAT IS TRUETYPE? TrueType is a standard for digital type fonts that was developed by Apple Computer, and subsequently licensed to Microsoft Corporation. Each company has made independent extensions to TrueType, which is used in both Windows and ...


10

OpenType technology doesn't allow randomness so ‘randomness’ must be simulated. OpenType ‘randomness’ can be simulated using groups of letters know as alternates. The idea that you could have 3 groups or more of the same letters that rotate; you’d expect to never see the same letter more than once in a word. Unfortunately due to letter combinations, ...


9

Randomness is possible.* You just have to be really smart and really dedicated to make it happen. Serious programming chops required. Most of the very natural looking handwriting fonts you'll find use contextual alternates and complicated ligature substitution. This actually achieves a more natural result than randomization. Some great examples of ...


6

To add to DA01's excellent answer and to provide additional context, OpenType comes in two flavors: TrueType and PostScript. So way back in the day, when Adobe created PostScript, they defined curves in a certain way mathematically. PostScript became wildly popular because it could accurately take things on screen and print them onto paper and it could ...


6

Tavmjong Bah has implemented the font variants in Inkscape, see http://tavmjong.free.fr/blog/?p=1442. This will be available in the upcoming v0.92, but if you're impatient then you can try the development builds


6

Creating a ligature that actually includes a space isn't ideal since spaces are often handled independently of your font (think word-spacing). The liga feature is for ligatures that should be used in normal conditions too, so what you're doing is a bit of a workaround. A better option is to use contextual ligatures (feature: clig). This means you can design ...


5

The way you authenticate a piece of software (a font is a piece of software) is you have a receipt of purchase and a license agreement on paper stored on file. Without these 2 options its nearly impossible to verify ownership. In case of digital stuff you still need to have a paper copy of the money transaction and the license key. Then the vendor can ...


5

For ligatures to be supported in an OpenType font, two things need to be there: the actual ligature glyphs (which you can check by scrolling through the glyph table with a symbol picker etc.) and a glyph substitution table that tells software to replace a sequence of characters by a ligature. There’s a handy piece of software called DTL OTMaster Light (free,...


4

Some OpenType fonts have several designs for a particular character and randomly show one so the text looks more naturally handwritten. For example http://fontfeed.com/archives/upcoming-fontfont-mister-k-pro/


4

While there are no standards, there are submissions to and recommendations from the World Wide Web Consortium. Fonts at World Wide Web Consortium has further, more technical information. The WOFF FAQ claims that WOFF, as it gains acceptance, allows better typography, accessibility, internationalization and Search Engine Optimization. On a related note that ...


4

What specific advantages or disadvantages can be found in the various font formats in today's technological setting?? As you stated, today's main advantage is with OpenType being able to support a much larger set of glyphs as well as other things like alternate characters and automatic character swapping. Should I be avoiding Type 1 and Type 3 whenever ...


4

Do you own a licence for the fonts? If so, most foundries will let you redownload a fresh, unmodified file that you can be sure is authentic. ;)


4

I haven’t tested this, but I this should be possible with contextual chaining substitutions. You roughly need to do the following (the details probably depend on the program you are using), taking the alternation between vertical and horizontal as an example: Make your default letters vertical. Create a single-substitution feature that replaces each ...


4

No, you don't need and I don't think you can install both anyway, they usually get in conflict. You need to choose one. Which one you choose depends on what you need and prefer. OpenTypes are like an "improved" version of TrueTypes. If you're using an old Windows system, the OpenType might not work unless you tweak the registry. If you do web design and ...


4

The Open Type format is, put simply, a standard "wrapper" for font information. The font information itself, i.e. the font outlines, can be either Truetype or CFF/Postscript, which use different kids of curves (different mathematical ways to define the curves). Truetype flavored means the outlines are in truetype format. More information on the OpenType ...


4

Assuming that your IJ glyph is appropriate to the Dutch eye (which I cannot tell), it should be used as a ligature for I+J by default for Dutch texts. While you can restrict every OpenType feature to specific locales, the arguably best way to do this would be via the feature locl, which is specifically reserved for such purposes. The OpenType cookbook uses ...


3

Short answer: It's specific to the implementation. Long answer: Research the market for your typeface. Look through how Google Webfonts does charsets and the Mac keyboard implementation of accented characters. Google provides some clarification on making charset calls, which is what occurs with websites and webapps. If your target market is something ...


3

As far as I know there is no standard for free fonts. You can release it in ttf format. Other formats (such as eot, woff) are webfont formats.


3

I did this in Word, but you should be able to do it in anything that has a glyph or symbol viewer. Ligatures are unique characters that have to be created, so just view the glyphs and see if the characters are there! If so, then ligatures are supported for that font. Most fonts will have at least 'fi' and 'fl' glyphs; 'ff', 'ffi', and 'ffl' are common as ...


3

In the Character Panel flyout Menu, with the type layer highlighted, Under "Opentype" uncheck "Discretionary Ligatures". Screenshot is from CS5 but it should be in the same location.


3

“Concerned” – not so much… “Aware” – definitely. The fact is that really good fonts should have shapes matched to their physical size. Simple scaling can't always do the trick, or rather: rarely can. Take, for example, Computer Modern. This font has variants intended for use at, among others, 6 and 11 points (AFAICR). Glyph shapes (especially proportion-wise)...


3

While it would be possible to have several styles inside one OpenType font as Stylistic Sets, it is absolutely unrecommended and you would need to do this manually with professional font design software like FontLab, Glyphs or Robofont. What you probably mean is combining special font files like small caps, tabular numerals, alternates or extended ...


3

OpenType Collections are just bundles of multiple font files. Each font within that collection is obviously limited by the maximum glyph limit, but as far as I'm aware there is no limit on the number of fonts contained within a collection. I can't find a defined limit either in any specification or in generators (i.e font editors). Microsoft's OpenType ...


3

It seems the features I need requires to generate an OpenType font, not TrueType. Am I right? Yes and no. The main difference between the otf and ttf file extensions (as usually used) is not the support of OpenType but things like the degree of Bézier curves, hinting information, and so on. Both formats can support OpenType. It seems that this may not be ...


3

PostScript (PS) Outlines are described with Cubic Bézier curves. TrueType (TT) Outlines are described with Quadratic Bézier Curves. Now, a Bézier curve of degree n can be converted into a Bézier curve of degree n+1 with the same shape (see Bézier Curve Degree Elevation). This means you can describe a TT Outline (Degree 2) exactly with a PS Outline (Degree 3)...


3

Form the list of Registered Features, you could choose: Stylistic Alternates (salt): "[...] alternate glyph designs for a purely aesthetic effect.", or Stylistic Sets (ssxx): "In addition to [...] stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (salt), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. ...


3

First not all Google fonts have the same license. A quick search found the following licences (which are listed on attribution page, but there can be more): SIL Open Font License, 1.1 (OFL) Apache License, Version 2.0 Ubuntu Font License, 1.0 Now, obviously all of those have different requirements. OFL fonts have no attribution requirement of downstream ...


2

The above link to Adobe, though helpful, is a bit outdated (makes references to Photoshop 6, for example). Here is the updated link for the Font Formats (True Type, etc): http://www.adobe.com/products/type/adobe-type-references-tips/font-formats.html


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