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Transparent inks can't stick to the surface of metallic inks. We've recently had this problem at the offset print house where I work. We wanted to print a black and white image where all the white areas were silver and for unknown reasons we forgot what we already knew. First we simply printed a solid silver rectangle and printed the black image on top of ...


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Make sure your text is selected and in your attributes panel, select "Overprint Fill".


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Note that your logos are not "disappearing" in Corel. The printer is showing you a screenshot of elements that have incorrect coloring - RGB and Spot colors. What you see in their screenshot is what needs fixing. To correct these you need to select them and change the fill/stroke to correct CMYK colors. By Overprint, the printer is referring to setting ...


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You can achieve this with offset or silk screen or even most other printing methods. You'll need to print the pink as a solid color (eg. Pantone Uncoated, no screen, no cmyk). Usually the printing colors are not opaque, so the cardboard will be 'tinted' not laquered. It's not complicated, but always talk to your printer (the man, not the device) to make sure ...


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It is absolutely normal to print over foilstamp. Moreover: print over the foilstamp is also much easier than to print to match precisely position on the knockouted foil. So don't worry, just prepare files correctly. Most likely printer will want to have foil and print parts as a separate files.


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CMYK ink is thinner and so gets sucked faster, sticks better to the paper without substantially altering the surface of the paper. Spot ink however is more dense and forms a more elastic layer on top of the paper, think of it like kind of a 'rubber' coating, which is more tricky to print on, dries slower, etc. In a more extreme comparison, think of ...


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My guess would be that either it complicates the printing process because it means that black ink will have to be applied after the spot ink (while default is spot inks are last) since the metallic ink is opaque; or a metallic spot ink is a bad surface to print on: the black ink may not stick to the metallic ink layer nearly as well as it does to the bare ...


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Always best to discuss your options with your printer. Printing on foil is common, but then usually a cold foil technique is used. Hotstamp foils create too much relief for a good ink transfer. Often, the printer has the foil unit installed at the end of the press (after the printing stations). In that case, a design like this would require a 2nd print run, ...


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Black is a special swatch in InDesign. It can't be deleted and it can be set to Overprint Black at 100%. Sadly, this is not the case in Illustrator, where Black is just the name of a swatch. Note that only the specific swatch Black can be set to overprint. If you manually make a CMYK(0, 0, 0, 100) swatch, it will knock-out instead. When the Illustrator ...


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The way you'll make sure overprinting is applied is simply by adding your background color to the color recipe of your gray illustration. Background CMYK + Gray CMYK = Fake Overprint of the gray. If the gray is a rich gray, you don't need to literally add the ink; as long the gray contains the same value or more of yellow/cyan/magenta than your background, ...


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Here's the thing - Sizes that big already need a printer that prints things that are larger than usual, which will usually mean that you need some kind of industrial printer that by default will cost more money than regular prints. The cheapest alternative I can think so will not necessarily be relevant for you but it is widely used for decorating walls and ...


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When working with metallics, there are a few rules to keep in mind: Work with a printer who has experience with them. This is not something to embark on with someone just as inexperienced as you are. Although there are cases where you can half-tone black on top of a metallic, such as for specialty photo reproduction, there are some metallics that won't ...


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I think the only way to find out would be run a short test job. Having worked in the printing trade, and having used fluorescent inks from time to time - I have found they can be somewhat problematic even without the addition of overprinting, as can other specialist inks such as metallics. Success might ultimately depend on the press/dampening system, the ...


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Raster images are treated as a whole. You can't specify plate interaction within raster images. If it were me, I'd use the black from Photoshop and set it to overprint, then draw a white shape in Illustrator behinds the raster and group the two.


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There is no universally accepted practice. It is true that the background is not white but transparent. However not all printhouses react the same way. There are at least 3 different ways they can handle this. You need to talk with your printer and ask how they prefer to handle this. Then because even printers are human and more importantly the printer you ...


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I see you have found some plausible images of detoriated painted surfaces. Also the knackered black text is quite plausible except its paint is not at all washed out during the years. If that's wanted, washing the colors by painting over is already presented in another answer. Obviously you have still not tried to erode text RESTRICTED AREA, which is a hole ...


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Very interesting question! But also very impossible to answer I'm afraid. I'm looking forward to see other answers. In the meantime, here are some problems to consider: Separating a given color into to solid inks is not a trivial mathematical task. There might be infinite solutions, or for some colors there might be none. Your main problem is that you need ...


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YES it can be done but it's no easy task. How difficult it would be depends entirely upon the artwork. One would use a multi-channel Photoshop document and create as many spot channels as are necessary. Then, on the channel, you simply paint or create black/grey areas for the color. Or, recreate things in Illustrator assigning spot colors. There's no "...


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My attempts playing with this. Start with a clean image. A. Get a nice texture https://www.texturepalace.com/gallery/metal/0405/8metal_texture_big_100405.jpg and saturate it a bit. B. Extract the green channel, because it has more contrast between the rust and the non-rusted areas. This file will be used in different moments. C. I inverted it and ...


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Overprinting only works on spot colors and (pure) C, M, Y, or K. If you change the color type to spot, you will see the results you expected. Caveat: using spot swatches in conjunction with transparency effects like multiply or <100% opacity levels may cause unexpected output results. The overprinting attribute doesn't cause these issues.


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Or, you could knock out the type (probably the default anyway) and use a CMYK rich black for the logo. Unless it's going to be difficult to print in register, or if this a spot-color-only job (only orange and black).


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Your printer isnt being very helpful by the sound of it, I thought professional Corel use dissolved 10 years ago along with Quark...!! You should be sending them your files as a PDF (they should also supply a spec) not a native format. Along with a .JPG proof for them to check. You must use ONLY CMYK elements within your print design in AI or when you ...


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Gradients of 100-0% will not work well. There will be a point (3-8% where the dot pattern will drop off sharply, leaving a visible line. Best to use a gradient that does not zero out,


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