41

LaTeX is meant exactly for stuff like this. LaTeX is a programming language of sorts, designed with the explicit purpose of typesetting documents... like, say, an essay template. It spits out nice, vectorized PDFs across Windows, OSX, and Linux, and it's also possible to define your own custom formats and commands. There's a wealth of documentation ...


18

You are correct. This is the way these things are done: only the paragraphs following the first are indented.      I can little hope to better express why we do this than Robert Bringhurst does when he explains in his widely acclaimed “typographer’s bible”, The Elements of Typographic Style: 2.3 Blocks and Paragraphs 2.3.1 ...


16

The style of embedding illustrations within a text block or floating on a page of a book surrounded by text or other design items is not a characteristic of the illustration itself. The illustrations themselves simply have no background. The images "float" on a featureless background. You might say they are "in limbo." Often, normal square framed ...


15

Ignoring the how old the onlooker might be, how high up, low down, indoors, artificial light or not, dark train stations, weather, is it a print sign or a screen, reflective road sign etc etc. There are a few tools that will help you calculate this, and there are some best practices. If you really want to get into this, your keyword will be signage. ...


14

This is a small item, so avoid filling precious whitespace by containing every element into its own separate box. Instead, break the design down into 2 sections for better separation between the top part (general overview) and bottom part (detailed 'specs'). For instance, you could leave the top against a white background, and only use the yellowish ...


12

There are a few issues here. Not everyone uses a grid system and even if they do there's no guarantee the grids are consistent. Maybe your example uses a four column grid with a wider left column. Grids are a tool. A guideline. They don't necessarily mean you are bound to your grid 100% of the time. Often, if people are designing using a pre-baked framework ...


12

Based upon zero information abut the actual process involved.... I would simplify a great deal. All that's needed is a single arrow path. This shows boxes 1-6 must go to LOREM, then IPSUM, then on to A B C D ... The key being that IPSUM distributes to all boxes below it, so you don't need to indicate that 6 boxes connected to LOREM, or IPSUM, before the ...


12

I don't think any of this has anything to do with Illustrator specifically. Illustrator is a fine tool for business cards just as InDesign, QuarkXpress, etc would be. 9pt type is small. Using Illustrator has nothing to do with that. For good readability using around 11pt type may be better. I do not think 9pt type is too small. It is generally fine for ...


11

Pull quote, Lift out, or Callouts are common terms. Which term is most fitting is somewhat dependent upon the content of the "box". A pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key ...


11

To answer your question, yes, Illustrator is accurate for the size of a business card, or any print document. The problem: 100% zoom is not the physical size of your document on-screen. Selecting that zoom level will not display the physical size, and even the "Actual size" zoom will not display the right size. The reason for this is that Illustrator knows ...


11

This is an opinion based answer, and there is no right or wrong here. Generally, I quite like the basic style of it. It's very traditional in a kind of educational establishment way. However in my opinion the main problem here is the way you have listed the various features centred on two lines. I don't think there's anything wrong with the fonts. It's just ...


10

I've used a method where the boxes are actually pieces of post-it notes. Today I use cellphone sized ones because they are usually big enough. You can cut them in shape put text on them. But the best function is that you can move them about. Even better your client can move them about. The thing is the mockup stage can not look too finished. People who are ...


10

I totally understand the frustration of being in weak in grids and typography, specially if you are a self taught graphic designer. To me this is very open ended question and that there is no right answer to point out for you. In my personal experience, it is how you train your eyes and get feedback from your fellow designers would certainly improve your ...


10

I'll start off by pointing out that fitting a 5x7 box into a 2x3 area (plus some gutters (which will only make the area thinner rather than fatter). You may find those horizontal guides very restrictive here. You can't even fit 7 into 5 anyway; they're both primes. What we can do, however, is to at least get those horizontal guides to line up with the ...


10

This is a common approach, but amounts to a stylistic choice. A quick, random check through my library found five books with every paragraph of a chapter indented but the first, one with every paragraph indented, and two with no indentation at all. What you are seeing may have originated with using drop cap lettering: It is easy to imagine as one evolves ...


10

From my own experience in broadcase, we often refered to these as "cut-out" and refered to the process of making a cut-out as "close-cutting". If you go on stock photography sites, you will find this term often returns the kind of image you are looking for. Also, "isolated" is a keyword often used to describe these.


10

This is merely my opinion... take it all with a grain of salt. Realize that I know nothing about your company, it's audience, the target market, the nature of the trade show. What you sell, what you profit from, who your owners are.. etc.... all of this helps target a design. I have merely focused on visual elements in your given image. This is a visual ...


9

I am amazed that not one of the responses gave the ACTUAL reason which is that it is far easier to work with shorter line lengths when it comes to the type set. This is especially true with the Linotype machine which revolutionized the newspaper industry. These devices actually formed the type set plates as they went along, line by line, creating molds that ...


9

Photoshop is probably the last choice for this type of work. InDesign could work better as it can natively create a 'facing pages' document, meaning left & right page templates and yes with the proper formatting everything can be vector in your template which will result in minimal file size. Since you appear to also need to typeset math into your ...


9

Vignette. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vignette (by extension) Any small borderless picture in a book, especially an engraving, photograph, or the like, which vanishes gradually at the edge. This is what I was looking for, for anyone who ends up looking for the same term. The problem appears to be that it's obscure enough that most modern ...


8

The problem with your link is proximity and emphasis. If you want people to notice it you need to add design to the entire page such as background colors to direct the user to different parts. That is a starting point for adding emphasis to the Upload Prenda. Depending on what you do with backgrounds, graphics, and the design you may also need to adjust ...


8

Please look at these resources Distance Legibility Chart additional explanation crazy resource also, you probably want to learn what the visual acuity is... If you want to calculate the proper 20/20 letter size based on distance you can use this formula: tan(5 minutes) = distance in feet/20 but it is not the BEST letter size, only the size that a ...


8

There are too many variables for one answer. The first thing to evaluate is the typeface. If you are using a face designed for signage, the general references Ilan provided are probably roughly accurate. On the other hand, if you're working on a branded piece where the typography is part of a larger brand standard, you'll have to do your own research. The x-...


8

In the US, the standard manual for all of this is The Chicago Manual of Style, published by the University of Chicago Press. It defines the order of front matter, back matter, the things that are necessary and those that are optional. The front matter begins with the first page inside the cover. In a book, that is the "half title" page. An epigraph or a ...


8

While changing orientation isn't unheard of (indeed, sometimes it can be used to striking affect), it's worth pointing out the full range of options available to you, obvious though they may be: Crop the image to a portrait format. Insert it as a landscape image despite the white space: too much white space is rarely an issue in an aesthetic sense. Insert ...


8

What I sometimes do is just place some very light gradients where the folds are going to be, on top of all the artwork and set these to 'multiply'. This kind of simulates the folded object while keeping it flat and helps people visualize page margins and the whitespace between folds. Make it a PDF without any printer marks so it renders nicely in Acrobat ...


8

Designing how a page should look is usually called layout and is not usually considered a part of typography but typography is often considered a necessary skill to do a good page layout. Page layout requires a good sense of composition. Normally one would be required to compose not just text but also graphics, photographs, background color and/or images ...


8

12 point text on A1 paper is the same size as 12 point text on A4 (or Letter) Try holding up a printed sample and see at what distance you can read it. Then imagine the same A4 paper tiled in a 2x4 matrix - do you need to see/read all the corners at once? That should give you a practical example of how big it will be and how readable the fonts are at that ...


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