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Have you tried scanning the picture twice? Before you start the second scan, turn the picture around by 180°. That way, the paper texture will cast its shadows in the opposite direction. Then use an image editor to align the two scans and average their pixel values together (e.g., by changing the opacity of the upper scan to 50%). You'll have to align the ...


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Since you already have G'MIC - might be an idea to look at the smoothing filters listed under the Repair section in the Plugin. This one is the Smooth (Bilateral) filter. Looks quite promising. However as a side note, I feel removing too much of the texture would detract from the look of a watercolour, making it look like it was painted on glass rather than ...


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I'm not an experienced GIMP user so I can't give you an application specific answer. This is perhaps more of a long comment. I do a lot of artwork scanning at work and want to share my experiences. Watercolor is perhaps the hardest media to scan. Often it has many details in the lightest areas which disappear if you try to get a white background. And if the ...


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I'm afraid no program except a well trained AI application can decide which is paper texture and should be removed and which is something painted. Some detail separation and noise smoothing algorithms can get close, but seemingly there's already a good answer (by Mr.Kerr) of it. I suggest you to remove all details on light areas and let the texture stay in ...


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