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32

This might not answer your question completely, but as part of my workflow, I use this technique sometimes. When trying to pick a colour palette (at the very beginning of the creative process), I try to recall from my memory an image or painting that fits the "mood" or "content" of the project. Then I take that image and, using Photoshop, I apply a Pixelate-...


24

This is for GIMP Start with something like an A5 canvas size Create a new brush like this Create a new Paint Dynamic preset, and set the matrix as follows Increase the size of the brush as you like, and paint random coloured lines, choosing different colours, on a new transparent layer above a black background layer. Continue until you've built up enough ...


16

This actually sounds like a question more about creativity and getting out of a comfort-zone than about technique but I will answer the technical side. How do you determine what colors work well for what objects? (i.e. "bright red on a canary yellow is too bright for good readability", etc.) This question is a little general, but to address your example: ...


14

I would judge by the company and its existence. If the company is a well established brand, like Coke Cola, Pepsi, Red Bull then an expectation of the brand's color scheme would be expected in your design and judged with a fine tooth comb. Also, depending on the company they may have a campaign they're trying to stick with that should be defined in the ...


14

Here' my approach for Gimp: Used an interesting photo with colours I liked Source: Wikimedia - New York Times Square Chose a region of interest from this photo Increased saturation, contrast, and (optionally) made an indexed Image Used the inbuilt filter paper tile with broad width and low height Scaled image to desired width The fun part is when only ...


13

It is not possible to copyright a color or even a combination of colors. It is possible to copyright the way a palette is presented. i.e. the images on that web site are copyrighted, not the colors themselves. For example.. this.. .. is copyrighted and requires the attribution to Aaron Burden on Unsplash, since it's his photo in the image. But.. I can use #...


11

Color Theory is a really vast area of expertise; I had entire classes on that subject alone when studying Creative arts and Graphic design. To give you the short answer, there are 2 things you should learn in order to argue colors intelligently: The basics of color theory The psychological meanings of colors. For the fundamentals of color theory, start ...


10

When I pick a color palette I narrow my selection to a max of 3-5 colors but I expand on those colors. For example, I usually run a script in Illustrator that will allow me to place each color in its own master palette and a variation of the color based from highlights and shadows I've used throughout the year help produce a HEX and RGB output in CSS. This ...


8

You have the Blue (B) modifier activated. Switch it back to Hue (H) for the familiar default. The purpose of these is to allow you to modify the individual components and (H, S, B, R, G, B, L a, or b) and provide visualization for the range. With the blue modifier active, you can quickly adjust the amount of blue in the color (0-255) by dragging along the ...


8

There's an art to it In visual perception a color is almost never seen as it really is — as it physically is. This fact makes color the most relative medium in art. // Josef Albers Color theory is where the physics of light and the psychology of color become much more than their scientific parts. Like choosing and setting type well, using color well ...


8

There's no exact value that says, "this is muted" but "this is not muted." If I were to come up with one on the spot as a general starting point I'd say use the HSB color spectrum and lower your colors S (saturation) to less than 50. Or using your example image all I did was lower the Saturation which brought the S value of all of them down to around 52%: ...


8

I think your initial process for trying to analyse this colour palette was inherently flawed since it seems to assume that selecting and using colour schemes is generally model based. As others have noted it certainly doesn't have to be and the selection process can often seem entirely random. Without knowing anything of the project or audience, not to ...


7

In GIMP 2.8 for an indexed image you can use the Colormap dialog, which is very simple to activate (see the provided link): In this dialog the entire palette is shown and you can edit each color by right clicking on it: Choosing Edit color, a color editor appears: And the effect is immediate:


6

Colour Psychology Colours mean different things to different people. It's caused by the fact that we all live different lives, with different outlooks, and that we're all unique. Some say the beauty of humanity is in such differences. Trying to perceive the differences through your own biases is an exercise in futility. You can try to be fair, but it's ...


6

It is arbitrary. Color selection is like any design process. Yes, there are some predefined methods which may work well for many, many things. But there's no rule, law, or statute which states you must adhere to those conventional methods. Many designers may stick to templates or predefined methods due to ease and speed they can provide. However, as a ...


6

My question to you: Why is your color palette better (or good)? I'm not meaning to imply that it's not. Your design may be objectively better for a number of reasons: better match existing branding desirable usability features (to help users distinguish important vs secondary information) better contrast between colors (vs conflict; this is a concept many ...


6

Some basic Python knowledge and a quick look at pyPNG Code Examples quickly lead to this: import png import sys def makeRamp (input_name, output_name): source = png.Reader(input_name) width, height, pixels, metadata = source.read() if metadata['bitdepth'] == 8 and metadata['planes'] == 1 and 'palette' in metadata: print ('processing 8-...


5

An interesting concept I first learned about on a male fashion advice page is to pick color combinations that occur in nature. For example, browns, light greens, and dark greens (forest); grays, light blues, and white (sky with clouds); etc. Obviously this isn't the be all and end all of color choice and combinations, but it might be a helpful thing to keep ...


5

I have struggled with this topic throughout my career. I really admire designers who are gifted when it comes to color. I have a dribbble bucket devoted just to color palettes that I admire. Text Contast I use the WCAG color contrast checker to check text and background color contrast. I will only use combos that pass Level AA; this will soon be required ...


5

Do 3 transitions, and discard the colours you don't need. For the sake of an example, here I have chosen MidnightBlue at one end, and a Yellow colour for the other transitions at either side:


5

On recent Ubuntu (since 18.04 at least, may be earlier) they made the Python support in Gimp optional. You can tell if your Gimp has Python support by looking at the bottom of the Filters menu that should have a Python-fu submenu alongside the Script-fu one. If it's not there you are missing Python. You can install the Gimp python support using sudo apt ...


5

All that coloring scheme is distracting and you need to keep people's focus on the content, not the random candy rainbow thing. Reduce the color scheme to a single color, in my example below, 8% of "C" blue, set everything to multiply, and play with something like this. The graphic needs to support, but not take over, the content. That, or try a ...


5

My two cents. A. Keep the palette monochromatic unless you want some other meaning than "Deep". You could use any color, but normally, a warm color will give you the additional meaning of "Hot", green of nature. Using blue could reference the sea, where darker blue means "deeper". B. Keep the colors, either light enough or dark ...


4

If it is not a Branding Color Scheme, I don't think the customer should know what colors you are using. but you can present the colors you use in an applicable way, not just dummy colors block beside the desig. what I mean If you are using a yellow for example, you should present the yellow in an applicable way, yellow in background banner, yellow in ...


4

I have also been met with looks of bewilderment or incomprehension in the past, and to combat this I now include a style guide which elaborates either on the use of existing color standards or new ones along with the type fonts, etc., etc. I explain that one great way to keep customers is to keep the brand consistent across all media - thus the need for the ...


4

This is exactly what the HSB colour model is for. HSB splits the colour into the values Hue (H), or colour type; Saturation (S), or (inverse) amount of white in the colour; and Brightness (B), (inverse) amount of black. Hue is expressed in degrees, with 0° being red, and 180° being cyan. Saturation and Brightness are expressed in precentages. 0% ...


4

Because the nearest color isn't universally accepted concept, I give my own formula. The problematic color is in the bottom layer and the palette is above it. The palette layer has blending mode = difference. Find the darkest piece in the palette. That's the nearest color. Use the color picker and watch the brightness values. In this case the nearest color ...


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