Hot answers tagged

19

How to measure things with a ruler: use a ruler Your object is made from squares and circles. Measure the width and height of the object, measure the inner square Measure the distance from the inner square to cut (r). the r is the radius of a circle that create the bows


11

The type of cardboard, thickness, and strength is going to depend on the weight and distribution of the product inside. If you're not a cardboard expert (I'm not either), then I would recommend a little R&D. Head down to a store, find a product with similar weight, quantity, shape, and package design to the one you want, and buy it to keep as a sample. ...


9

Length of a perfect circular fold for 180 degree turn is π × W:           Image 1 Corner shift In practice thus you have some slack to the inner side, so W is actually width of paper plus how much inner radius you use. So W is somewhere between 1-2 times the width of the card stock. and the amount of paper ...


8

There are basically 3 or 4 types of general finishes on stock without getting into texture finishes such as laid or linen... Newsprint/Craft/etc. : These are low-end raw papers used more for utility purposes. Customarily not used for consumer level marketing materials. Newsprint obviously refers to newspapers to give you an idea of quality. Offset : a ...


8

Such a thing does not exist, unfortunately. The sheer number of paper and board suppliers, the vast number of substrates that most of them produce and the constant innovation mean that you could never really have a universal standard set of papers. Even if you were to source something standard (like 150gsm semi gloss coated) from a handful of different ...


7

Overprint preview in Illustrator somewhat works. In Illustrator, you can draw a rectangle which matches your stock color. Place it on a layer below all other layers and lock it. Use the Attributes Panel in Illustrator to set subsequent objects to overprint. Then in the View menu, choose Overprint Preview. Unfortunately, this same method doesn't really ...


7

I somehow agree that this is not entirely a design problem, but a production one... BUT... Designing is knowing some production process, and in my opinion, this is important to optimize costs, which it is also a part of the design. folds tend to tear more This is not an issue for me. If I want something to be everlasting I would recommend synthetic ...


6

Get a sample of the paper and print in color on it. It's the only way either of you will see anything close to what it really looks like. You could try creating a layer in Photoshop which is the color of your paper, and putting your colored photo on top of it with a certain amount of transparency (ETA or blend mode, as Dominic suggests), but those are ...


6

This is a perfect situation for the smart-blur tool since the text information is high-contrast with respect to the background. I have a sample below where I applied a mild smart blur just enough to flatten out the grainy nature of the scan. I then added a layer filled with RGB(128,128,128) and used the noise filter with color on and gaussian distribution. ...


6

You can not "standarize" that much because they refer to diferent things. Let me explain a bit some units. gsm Paper sheets are made of, oh well, paper, and the easiest way to measure biiiiiig chunks of paper (Rools actually) is weight. Weight is the first unit here. If you make a paper twice the thicness you have twice the material. The first formula ...


6

get a piece of millimeter paper, put your shape onto it and scan the pile. Orient the symmetry axles of your shape along the grid as accurately as possible. Add also major diameters as numbers.


5

If your work consists of posters, brochures, business cards that were produced and used, then you should have the paper quality that the client got. Basically you should have in your portfolio some examples of stuff you have done. If you only have your work digitally, I would simply go for the best paper possible, the most expensive and/or best fitted to ...


5

Either scan or photograph the cutout shape next to a ruler. Any designer worth the title will be able to redraw the shape from that and then send you back a file that you can print out at 100% scale to verify the shape. I've had to do similar things in the past and I've been able to get well within a millimetre of the actual shape. A couple of tips: Two ...


5

Attach some tape to the piece of paper and stick it to a sturdy desk so it is oriented upright. Next to it place the following items: Left of piece of paper: Pea Dime (standing) Golf Ball Right of the piece of paper: Tangerine Apple Tennis ball Basketball Cantaloupe melon (or watermelon) Take a high resolution photograph and email it to the designer ...


5

You always want to go with the fiber, parallel, when going against it is perpendicular. Grain direction is made at production where the fiber set perpendicular to rollers that create the sheet. In hand made paper grain usually don't have direction because there is nothing to push fibers in one drections. When printer set the paper in machine (usually sheet)...


4

Wow, I feel your pain. Been there. Whether you present the additional work depends entirely on the kind of relationship you have with the client. If this is a new or casual client, not someone you can speak with bluntly, just prepare a scope of work and quote to cover the website and stationery and ignore the rest. If you can speak honestly to this ...


4

I think you're right. Classically, inner margins are smaller than outer margins. However, you do need to ensure the inner margins are large enough to keep content out of the gutter. The reason outer margins are larger is due to creep. (which you can calculate). Creep is the slow outward movement of content due to the gutter and binding. Content will move ...


4

In addition to weights and finish there's what tailors call "hand" - how it feels when you're holding it. The weight and finish will contribute to the total feel of the document in your hand as well as how colors appear and the overall look. What look or feel are you going for? There's as much variety in materials and finishes as there are in inks; are you ...


4

The 'pound' of paper (paper weight) refers to (supposedly, though I think this is a loose rule of thumb) the weight of a ream of said paper. The heaver the pound, the denser (typically, thicker) the paper. 20# paper is your typical copier paper. 80# and 100# are thicker/sturdier and (literally) 'heftier'. Most paper above 50# is considered 'card stock' ...


4

It is one of two cellophane lamination applied after print, I comes in a film roll format, in matte and glossy, the matte one is the one that has that waxy feel to it.


3

Multiply will give you an ok feel of how dark the colors will get on non-white cardboard. For prepress you can remove the effect. Also with some cardboard colors might bleed a lot, so fine details might get lost. Discuss your preview with your printer to avoid surprises.


3

First, you should be using overprint preview rather than multiply. Just be sure the overprint settings are correct for each ink. Second, you don't have to do anything. Just print it and the substrate and ink will do the rest ... again, assuming your overprint settings are correct.


3

I'd say 1000 is enough, it's very bright actually. It's similar to normal daylight and that's what is usually recommended for graphic design on computers as well. You can go a bit lower for your own comfort and depending on the style of drawing you do; your eyes are probably the best calibrating tool to evaluate contrasts and colors. Unlike working on ...


3

Hi Vincent and welcome! I think Tschichold's Canon works esthetically but yes, depending on your binding, you will have to add to the inner margin. It obviously depends on the kind of binding and also the amount of pages in your book. There are other canons like Van de Graaf and Rosarivo and Bringhurst also has a nice section about page proportions in his ...


3

I was wondering on what kind of paper should I take the print outs of my work? The kind of paper depends on what you are printing. If you are printing stationary then actually get it printed the card stock they recommend. If you are printing brochures then actually get the printer to fold it for you. Actual demos of your portfolio work gives a better ...


3

Paper determines line quality My first assignment in graphic design class was, "Using a black marker, create a 6" x 6" composition in the centre of a 9" x 12" sheet of bond paper." The lesson helps to demonstrate how paper and ink interact. Some marker-paper combinations allow a thin clean line while others bleed to enable smooth streak-free area coverage. ...


3

This looks very much like it was made from one of the Photoshop mockup templates that have become so abundant on the web since Smart Objects (CS4) arrived on the scene. They make it easy for beginners (and quick for designers) to create sophisticated, highly realistic mockups of designs in context. Even deep debossing and fabric textures are out there in "...


3

This is just how I would do this, maybe it's not an option for you. This is a technique that goes very quick and will not affect the quality of your black text at all. I'd isolate the black text using the levels; the textured background will become white and the black text will remain 100% black. To achieve this, you'll need to use the white color picker ...


3

There are no standard sizes or stocks. A "flier" can be any size on any stock. You can use whatever size and stock you want. The word "flier" on its own designates the intended usage, not the appearance in any way. To relate this to your profession.... this question is similar to asking, "What ethnicity is a patient?" There is no "standard" answer. Use ...


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