6

One good trick is to use the same spiral/shape over and over again. Then mirror, rotate and cut it about. You want the same after all, then use the same. Image 1: Spirals for the same stock. The magenta one is rotated and mirrored segment of the blue one. In practice make one bigger master spiral and replicate that. Since the spiral is also invariant in ...


6

As of Inkscape 0.91, yes you can copy and paste path effects. Apply whatever path effects you want to one path. Copy that path Ctrl+C. Select the path(s) to which you want to apply the copied path's effects. Click Path > Paste Path Effect Ctrl+7. This will preserve any settings you have on the path effects as well.


5

First create a diagonal line with the pen tool. Use the type on path text tool and type your text. Select the Path Type object and go Type > Type on a Path > Type on a Path Options to bring up the Type on a Path dialog. Chose Stair Step and Gravity to control the orientation of the type relative to the path.


3

Arrows can only go from one edge of the path to the other, consider making each arrowhead it's own individual shape and just placing them along the points of the path/stroke where you want them. If the arrowhead was it's own shape, you can just place it how you'd like along the path (which would just be a standard stroke) You could also use this script ...


3

You could try drawing it manually, by using the Pen Tool, and enabling the Grid, and Snap to Grid.


3

In the future you maybe really need cutting in Illustrator. You can use Clipping Masks (this is non-destructive), Pathfinder panel operations or you can use Object > Path > Divide Objects Below. Only one example. It's of the Pathfinder panel: Step 1: Fix the effect on your zigzagged rectangle. Select it and goto Object > Expand Appearance which returns ...


3

I wanted to add a illustrator method that gives you a lot more artistic control. make a sequence of straight wiggly curves, this should be easy. At least much easier than moving the curved shape. Make an art brushes out of the wiggly shapes and then assign those wiggly curve brushes to the object in question in sequence. (this step is easy to script, as ...


3

One option (without seeing the video) is: Make two layers. In the superior layer put the white part of the road, let's say you use a width of 1mm. Copy the layer and put it below the previous one and on this layer use a black stroke of 2 mm.


3

Quickly applied pseudo-3D effects for tubes or cables are the inbuilt bevel effects of Inkscape. After selecting an object or group of objects these can be accessed by Filters > Bevels. Below I used Deep Color Plastic effect:


3

You must make a Compound Path for the selected paths and use the Appearance panel to assign additional strokes and fills. Do not use black for the color of an end point on the gradient. Additional help image. Appearance panel settings.


2

I found that if you work at too small of a size, the threshold is too small so the inset starts to lose detail. However, if you make your part larger, you can use the tool more effectively and resize your work afterwards. This is just what worked for me when I had the same problem.


2

Try with a much smaller shape and it should work... http://svgshare.com/s/12z Additionally, add some extra notes to the path you're bending. This allows Inksccape to 'shape' the object more easily.


2

You can drag a shape to your brushes panel and make it new pattern brush. After that select a line. Then click the new brush in your brush collection. Make one horizontal line and apply the new brush. You will make the pattern overlapping itself by expanding the appearance and adding a stroke. Rotate & copy the new-shape lines as will. An example: a ...


2

Just save your shape as an art brush / pattern brush (depends on what are you trying to achieve)


2

I am a 3D generalist as well as an illustrator user, and I’ll say for just this I’d stay in illustrator. Yup, the mesh tool, yup patience when first trying. I did a slightly more complex but similar thing to this, with depth to the baseplane shown at the edge, ground colour there, dark green substrate and green gooey wireframes above, mountains and valleys, ...


2

In newer version(s), you can direct-select the path and then double click the Live Corners widget that should appear near the corner. Without live corners you can try: (after you set the roundness) select the corner anchor points individually, and then rotate them. Upper left: 90, lower left, -90 etc


2

This is best done at the After-Effects stage. Inside AE you can use the displacement effects and various techniques to make your single Illustrator-exported path to take on various appearances. Take a look at this link and be aware that what any one tutorial video for certain AE techniques could contain just the one detail which could super-charge your ...


2

I've a far easier solution for you: select your linework, duplicate it, then apply Effects>Tweak with a very low percentage set, and iterate till you get what you want. Starting sketch: Tweaked once @ 1%: And if you like this idea well enough, you can then apply this effect to your items through the appearance palette, which then allows you both to keep ...


2

If you want perfectly smooth curves, then auto tracing a poor quality bitmap is probably not the best way to do it. Instead, you could manually trace over the lines of the bitmap with the Bézier tool set to apply an ellipse as the Shape in the tool options. This creates a Path Effect. Then you could alter the thickness of the Path Effect by clicking and ...


2

After applying the Effect, chose Object > Expand Appearance and the effect will be "baked In" making the path actually look like the effect. You can then use the Type On A Path feature to add text.


2

The easiest way is probably to group the artwork, then draw a path with the Pen Tool to define the area you want to cut out, then select both artwork and path, and do Object > Clipping Mask > Make. If you want to retain the outline, copy it before applying the clipping mask, then apply the clipping mask, then do Edit > Paste in Place to get the ...


1

I agree with everyone saying to do this in 3D. But if you really want to do it without digging into 3D then I'll offer a completely different solution at least for the ground work. My old love, Photoshop. Let's make a base: Start by creating a grid pattern Now make a rectangular selection and fill with the grid pattern (on a new layer) Use perspective ...


1

I wouldn't try to draw it in Illustrator. It's much easier to make a 3D terrain in a polygon mesh modelling program and export it as a wireframe with no hidden lines. Here's a plane which has got some random bumps by dragging some surface faces(=squares) upwards and then applying polygon subdivision and smoothing. Total creation time = 2 minutes. This is ...


1

Your image is a static trajectory of an electron. You obviously try to show the route and all places where the electron has been lived a while as a part of some material structure. The three darker areas obviously have something which makes those areas a little more attractive and the electron has been felt the possible landing points in them comfortable a ...


1

Clipping Paths explained for dummies? sure! Cut a hole in a piece of paper with some scissors. Place the paper over another piece of paper with a drawing or picture on it. That's what a clipping path does. You can see the drawing through the hole. Release it, and you take away top piece of paper, and you can now see the entire drawing again.


1

This is not practical in Photoshop or other raster image programs. Illustrator gives some results easily: The original text Outlined, fill removed, added thin stroke and added 2 offset paths; The lower row is not united to one shape => not full-length lines Outlined, stretched the characters to overlap, United to one shape, removed fill, added thin stroke, ...


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