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I think this would be easier to draw manually with the Pen tool in Illustrator, or the Bézier tool in Inkscape. At least that way you can get a nice smooth curve. There's nothing automated that will beat the human eye, and a little skill. All you need is a some practice. If you have a lot of these to do, then you'll get better each time.


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Seriously: No automatic tracing can extract the one and only right path under your dot chain. That's because the tracing should know the mathematical criteria for the right path. You may know it but I can only make a guess. Especially ambiquous for automatic methods are the crossings. There's zero information of should it be X or ><. Another difficulty is ...


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It's not doing anything. As this post says, the M just means "move to 10, 10". There are no other commands, so it's not doing anything. Looking at the page, it seems they're setting up the demo for future examples.


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Select the O Choose Object > Compound path > Release from the menu Both shapes are then standard shapes.. fill them however you'd like.


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Yes and no. You can make a bunch of segments where the ends happen to have the same coordinates as the ends of other segments. But you cannot have "a network of nodes", where nodes are connected to more than two other nodes. You cannot have a gradient along the stroke (for exactly the length of the stroke) because there is no API to set this length (aka "...


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I think it's the strokes butting up against the centre line, or protruding over it, that might be interfering with the reflection effect. Illustrator calculates the appearance transform effect from the edge of the artwork upto and including the edge of the stroke (i.e. not the path itself). Here is one way to avoid the problem, although it takes a little ...


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Click on the whole layer (not the sublayer but the main one) and put no stroke and no fill.


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