45

Open up the Pathfinder palette (Window > Pathfinder or Shift+Control+F9). Select one hand and the circle and press the 'subtract' button: Depending on your preferences, the 'Expand' button may become clickable. If it does, click it. Repeat with the other hand. It might be a good idea to make copies of the hand shapes in advance (and paste them in front, ...


27

Keep the number of anchors you place to a minimum, make sure you have placed plenty of guides, and constrain the angle of the Bézier handles vertically by holding down Shift after you begin clicking and dragging with the Pen tool.


23

When exploring things like this it is best to use very rudimentary objects so you can see the differences. I started with the red circle and black rectangle. I then added a green/yellow stroke after the pathfinder operation so you can see edges better. As you'll notice each operation results in different artwork. The only two which are similar are Trim and ...


10

Select both circles and click the Divide button on the Pathfinder Panel. This will create 3 separate shapes. You can also simply grab the Live Paint Bucket Tool and click once on the circles to create a Live Paint Group, then continue clicking areas to fill them with color. When done click the Expand button on the control bar across the top of the screen to ...


9

Assuming the yellow needs to be removed from the mountain. Select the yellow and choose Object > Expand from the menu. This converts the strokes to shapes. Pathfinder doesn't work well with strokes, it needs shapes. Once the strokes are expanded you should be able to use Pathfinder to subtract the yellow shapes from the mountain (or anything else).


9

To create compound paths/shapes, you simply need to select the objects then choose Object > Compound Path > Make from the menu.


9

Sometimes the path direction causes the effect to not be visible. After creating outlines from the text, try selecting the outlined text as well as the rectangle and create a Compound Path via the Object menu.


9

By selecting both shapes and hitting Subtract on the Pathfinder Palette:


9

Illustrator can't do Pathfinder effects on rasterised files it has placed. To achieve this effect, you will indeed have to use a clipping mask: draw a circle snugly around your star; unite all your white lines to a single shape; subtract the lines shape from the circle using the Pathfinder; ungroup the result... ...and make it a compound path: Object > ...


8

I made this in about 3 minutes using the circle tool, direct selection tool and live paint. I don't know if there's a faster way, but this was pretty quick. Basically, draw a circle and a smaller circle inside that circle. Draw a new circle that is the exact width between the left anchor point of the inner circle and the right anchor point of the outer ...


8

This doesn't answer your question specifically (no "cutting" involved), but another less-permanent way to do this is with a clipping mask. Duplicate the circle and make sure it is above the art you want to remove. Then, select both the circle and the art, and do Object → Clipping Mask → Make. This will just "hide" the portion that you don'...


8

One way to go is to select your paths, go to Layer -> Paths -> Join


7

Create the circle shape. Remove the fill. Give it a stroke that is as thick as the width you want. Go to Object → Expand.. in the top horizontal menu. Create a rectangle that's as thick as you want the gaps to be. While you still have the rectangle selected, hold Shift and select the circle. Use the alignment options to center it horizontally and ...


7

This is most effectively achieved by offsetting the path of the front shape, and subtracting the resulting shape from all the shapes in the back, using the Pathfinder. As an example, say I'd like to do the outlining with the blue shape as my front shape: Select the blue shape with the Move tool (V); Choose Object > Path > Offset Path...; Key in an ...


7

An easy way to create things like this is to utilize existing rudimentary options. Draw a Rounded Rectangle using the Rounded Rectangle Tool. While dragging tap the Up Arrow until the sides are completely rounded. Set the shape to have a very thick stroke. If you know they rectangles you need are 20px in height (you can check by selecting one and looking ...


6

You can simply draw a line and use Effect > Distort & Transform > Roughen to create a jagged line. Then copy the line, select both the "rough" lines and choose Object > Expand Appearance. Then select the end points and join them via Object > Path > Join. It's important to draw a separate line and apply the effect to just a line if you don'...


6

Its easy: by using shape builder tool - (Shift+M) step 1- make 2 shapes as shown in the image step 2- keep both objects together and select both the images. step 3- use the shape builder tool(Shift+M) and alt+click on the part of image you want to remove. step 4- the unwanted part of image will be removed....we can just play around with this tool....its ...


6

In Illustrator... Select it all, Pathfinder > Merge, click the red, hit delete. Or Select it all, grab the Shape Builder Tool, Hold down the Option/Alt and click-drag starting below the rings, to the center ring covered by red.


6

For this you first need to select all of the letters and create a compound path. Object>Compound Path>Make THEN do your pathfinder minus front.


6

The easiest method is to change the color of the rectangle to something other than the type color. I'd choose white. Select the (now white) rectangle and the type and use Pathfinder > Merge. Select the white rectangle and choose Select > Same > Fill & Stroke Hit the delete key. Merge combines shapes of similar fills and removes any other ...


6

I think Opacity Masks are the easiest here. They are essentially a one-click method which is non-destructive. If you use 100% solid vector objects for the mask, then there's no concern about half toning either and the mask is just as infinitely scalable as the artwork under it. In addition, this method allows the mask artwork to be scaled, rotated, or ...


6

If the path is a stroke Make a square that cuts off the top part of the V shape. You do not need a fill or stroke for the square. Select both, go to Object -> Clipping Mask -> Make. If the path is expanded You can use the direct select tool and manually move the inner-endpoints down. OR Make a square that cuts off the top part of the V shape. Open the ...


6

Use the Shape Builder Tool. Select both circles and merely drag across the path you don't want.


6

You need to change the fill rule of the compound path. An even-odd fill rule will give you the effect you're seeing whereas a non-zero winding fill rule uses path direction to determine the fill. You can change both fill rule and path direction from the Attributes panel. It's not clear from your screenshot if you have a single path or multiple paths making ...


6

Whenever possible I prefer to work in a non-destructive manner to make future editing much easier. To this end I, personally, would not use Pathfinder here. I'd use a Clipping Mask on the blade. Copy the blade shapes paste the copy on top of everything Draw a new shape which covers the areas of the blade you want to show on top of the snake. Make certain it'...


5

Quick and easy: Put your figure in the back. Set your text in the front. Turn your text into outlines. Select both. Pathfinder→Divide. This breaks the text into pieces using the back figure as the slice point. Use the white arrow to select the pieces of the text which overlay the figure. Color at will.


5

One quick and easy way to do this is with a Clipping Mask: I've got two text layers, one for green and one for purple. I duplicated the silhouette path and used it as a Clipping Mask for the purple text Another way is to use Blending Modes: The top silhouette is filled with blue and the Blending Mode is set to Overlay. Under that is a duplicate of the ...


5

Draw a shape which covers the area you want to remove. Select the new path and the continent. On the Pathfinder Panel (Window > Pathfinder), click the Minus Front button.


5

I managed to find a good solution using Illustrator CS5.5. Like they mentioned earlier in the post, create your filled rectangle. Next place your choice text on top. Then transform text into paths (Type > Create Outlines). Finally select both type and rectangle and Alt+Click 'Minus-Front' command to create a Compound Shape. That should do it! I added a ...


5

It's an extremely simple shape. Why not just draw two rectangles and a triangle, arrange them accordingly and assign them a stroke with “rounded joints”. Then select them all and use Pathfinder's “Add” operation. That's it! This way, you can easily adjust the stroke thickness as required:


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