32

The easiest way I figured out is probably this: Draw a figure. Select the pattern from Fill and Stroke ("Füllung und Kontur"). Click Extensions > Colour > Replace colour .. (should be something like Erweiterungen > Farbe > Farbe ersetzen in German). Enter the hex code for your desired colour. Another way: Select Edit >> XML Editor. Expand svg:defs >> svg:...


24

Select all Choose Edit > Edit Colors > Recolor Artwork Click the Edit tab at the top Click the Link colors icon in the middle of the window Move the color wheel indicators or.... Set the sliders to Global Adjust and then adjust the sliders


23

Well you can actually make it a pattern in Photoshop. With the tile open, select all and choose Edit > Define Pattern. Then it's a pattern just like all the other built in Photoshop patterns. If you know the tile size you can create a new document the size of 4 tiles, then just apply a pattern fill layer. With a 500x500px tile, create a 1000x1000px ...


22

This is for GIMP Start with something like an A5 canvas size Create a new brush like this Create a new Paint Dynamic preset, and set the matrix as follows Increase the size of the brush as you like, and paint random coloured lines, choosing different colours, on a new transparent layer above a black background layer. Continue until you've built up enough ...


20

With a bit of boolean operation trickery this is a pretty easy process. Just take a set of the hexagons you have there, create a rectangle that matches the orange one I've got in the image above (make sure the corners snap to the appropriate points on the hexagons), and then use the intersection tool to get rid of everything outside of the rectangle. That ...


20

One way is to use the Scale window from Object > Transform > Scale but with only Transform Patterns ticked. If it seems to not work, make sure the selection isn't grouped. To apply this to everything a pattern is applied to, first select something that has the pattern, then Select > Same > Fill color.


20

The closest in Illustrator made with several Pattern Brush Make many pattern brushes with three figures as shown in the gif Press Alt and drag to the brush panel different figures to replace the brush end and start Make short horizontal segments inside the main shape where the figures will be, or make just one segment and after testing it with the brush, ...


19

Select the overlapping shapes and use Divide in the Pathfinder palette to chop the shapes into pieces: That will look something like this: Then select the appropriate pieces and use Unite in the Pathfinder palette to recombine them like this:


18

You could script something to generate these but it's easy enough with a couple of circles, depending on the level of control and precision you need. This is just a bunch of concentric circles with a dashed stroke set with 0.1pt dashes: You can use a width profile to control the size of the dots and simply add a gradient stroke for the color: If you need ...


18

With a pattern. In this case a 3 axis pattern (triangular). Once you know what to draw on each piece, you need to repeat this. You can have and use sub patterns or smaller ones to be more exact. These patterns are pretty easy to draw, and they are used for example in architecture in different cultures. We are used more to a square pattern, but this ...


17

Use the Polar Grid Tool. This is what it's for. Tap the ↑ arrow on the keyboard while dragging to add rings. Tap the ↓ arrow while dragging to remove rings. Tap → or ← arrows to remove or add dividing lines.


17

You can't really have solid shapes like that overlapping above and below different parts of the same shape. What I normally do is simply duplicate the shape. You then have one for the "behind" parts and one for the "in front" parts, and delete, mask or otherwise hide the appropriate areas... So you start with two shapes like this: Duplicate the bottom ...


15

(BTW - nuns also made illuminated manuscripts...) Very interesting question. I have studied old manuscripts for years, and there are a few things to keep in mind; either as explanations or as interesting anomalies. I think a general history of illuminated manuscripts might also be interesting, but that would be a different question. Vellum and parchment ...


15

Photoshop is not in the list, but just in case. Image from unsplash.com: Menu Filter > Noise > Add noise Menu Filter > Blur > Motion Blur Menu Filter > Sharpen > Smart sharpen Select the part of the image you like most and crop it. Adding an Adjustment layer of Hue/Saturation choose the color style: Rotate 90º To increase the image size if it's ...


14

I'd start by use the brush to scribble with some different colors that you'd like. Then we can use Filter → Pixelate → Mosaic... to turn it into some nice squares Then we can do a Skew transform (Control + T on Windows) Tweak and crop as necessary to get the size and angle you want


14

Here' my approach for Gimp: Used an interesting photo with colours I liked Source: Wikimedia - New York Times Square Chose a region of interest from this photo Increased saturation, contrast, and (optionally) made an indexed Image Used the inbuilt filter paper tile with broad width and low height Scaled image to desired width The fun part is when only ...


13

OK, I think I know what's the problem here! Some times the handles are out of the document. You should double click the pattern to show all the handles available, then check the two handles attached to the origin point. Normally the origin point is at the center of the shape but sometimes Inkscape save / remember your work-space session preferences. This is ...


12

These images are called illusory motion, and curiously enough, there's still no solid explanation for them (there are strong theories, though). Some visual scientists think it has to do with fixation jitter: involuntary eye movements that give the illusion that objects near what you're fixated on are moving. Others think that when you glance ...


12

Use a pattern... There are a bunch of line patterns loaded with Illustrator by default (Open Swatch Library → Patterns → Basic Graphics → Basic Graphics Lines). You can use them as a second fill using the appearance panel and use blending etc to get the effect you want. You can add a Transform effect to that specific fill (make sure to check ...


11

Create a dashed path and define the stroke weight + dash and gap sizes


10

As you have already selected the correct answer, this is for anyone who want to know the exact steps. Create your smallest circle using the ellipse tool, then create your biggest circle around it (copy the smaller circle then press ctrl+shift+v to paste in place and hold shift to scale up (On PC)); highlight the two and choose Object > Blend > Make ...


10

It is not that hard. And here is how you can make it: 1. Create a desired size rectangle, add a line across it and align them properly to center. Then copy-rotate the line by 10 degrees (or 6, 360 needs to be divisible without remainder). 2. Then select all objects and click on the Divide tool on the Pathfinder Panel. 3. Now easily select every secont ...


10

Use Blend and Clipping Masks! Make a text by text tool and write anything! Press P to select pen tool and draw simple line (you can use line tool too). Remove Fill and Give Stroke to the line eg. 4px. Duplicate your line and drag it down and reduce stroke to very less eg. 1px; Go to Object → Blend → Blend Options and change spacing to Specific Steps and ...


9

A very similar question was asked not long ago: How to recreate this background in photoshop for use in a mobile app? The one you provided is a little different with some wavy lines added. I was able to create something pretty close by doing the following: Step 1: Create a document with the desired size and color Step 2: As per the answer in the linked ...


9

Method one - works with any shape. Create a no-fill, no-stroke rectangle and place a $ sign in the middle of it. $ sign must be on top of the rectangle. The amount of space between the $ sign and the rectangle edges will determine the spacing between the repeated $ signs. Drag all that to the Brush panel and choose Pattern Brush when asked. Then click OK ...


9

You can create your own colorful pattern, but you can also simply change the color of the built-in patterns for your file. For example, starting from a simple shape filled with a built-in pattern: You can change default color (black in the example) using Extensions -> Color -> Replace color command In the pop-up windows you can replace the original ...


9

Create the largest one. Then create the smallest one via Edit > Copy (Ctrl/Option+C) -> Edit > Paste in front (Ctrl/Option+F) -> scale down. Then select both objects, go to Object -> Blend and select specified steps.


8

You need 2 pattern brushes - one for the diamonds and one for the hash marks. When you create the pattern brush for the diamonds you want to ensure you select "Approximate Path" for the fitting method. This will prevent stretching and distorting to fit the path. Fitting method for the hash marks isn't as critical. This is a quick mock up.....


8

The trick is to work with the outer edges of the image so they wrap around. One way is to take your tile and use the Offset filter (under the Filter > Other menu) and offset it by half the tile's pixel dimensions. Once you do this, you can use your clone and touch up tools to eliminate the seams. and either use it as-is or offset it again by half.


8

Open image in Photoshop Go to Filters > Other > Offset Adjust vertical offset so that the image seam is in the middle of the image Use the liquify tool to seamlessly connect the ribbons together Fail miserably Consider trimming all excess whitespace, and use background-size: contain instead More info on the background-size property


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