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A heartily recommendation: cairosvg, a python svg converter. cairosvg mySVGinputFile.svg -o outputfile.pdf Advantages: .pdf files have a smaller size as compared to inkscape conversion simpler command line. If you want to perform batch conversions, i.e., to convert many files at once, see this answer.


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Make sure the layer is visible for print. Double-click on the layer to open the Layer Options Make sure there is a checkmark next to "Print". If this option is unchecked, the layer will not be visible in a PDF viewer and will not print. This option is useful when adding notes to an Illustrator file but someone casually viewing the PDF does not ...


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Export to EPS and use a text editor (best: vim) to replace the color. E.g. execute :%s/0 1 0 rgb/0 0.5 0 rgb/ in vim to replace (light) green by a darker one. Afterwards create a PDF from the EPS.


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This workload is too big especially at 200+ collaborators, however, if you need to somehow unify the workflow, they will all need to install and learn the same something app. You could take a look at InCopy, which is a minimized version of InDesign with limited editing capabilities, but especially created for this specific purpose. Otherwise, if the team is ...


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Hard to notice. I can barely see the issue. Hard to fix. Each app (yes, that includes multiple Adobe apps) will always (yes, always) render the same thing in a slightly different way (because of settings and/or just different render algos). Let it go :)


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This looks like an issue caused by the difference between black and rich black (since I can't comment, which I would prefer in this case): follow these steps, applying rich black where you have used black, and then get back to your question, should that not solve your issue. Fingers crossed: https://indesignskills.com/skills/how-to-print-black-black/


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I was struggling with the same issue today and it is totally possible :) After searching I came across this tutorial from Figma: https://help.figma.com/hc/en-us/articles/360045942953-Add-links-to-text I know this is like half a year later and I'm hoping you got sorted before now, but just thought I'd let you know :)


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No This would just be a huge source of confusion because it assumes the person looking at a file knows that bleeds exist and have been hidden by the viewing software or not. This is why printer trim marks exist :) A printer should quote the specs for a job ahead of time (or you should be aware of what print specs you're buying). If the quote says the printer ...


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No, bleeds cannot be disabled from a PDF view. A PDF either has bleed, or it doesn't. There is no "bleed on & off" button when looking at a PDF. First, make sure you discuss this with the printer explicitly and understand what kind of PDF they need. In some cases they do not need a bleed on the PDF, otherwise you need to follow these steps and ...


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Don't do this. ...even if it turns out to be possible. In my opinion, there is never a need to do this, and it even encourages printing errors. First off, I'd like to repeat what Billy says: if you are using the bleed area, fill it up completely. Not doing so defeats the point of using bleed and may end up confusing your printer. Possibly, getting your PDF ...


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If you have been asked to create a 0.125" bleed, then you should make sure the image fits the bleed or overlaps it slightly. If it doesn't extend all the way to the edge, then it will not technically be a 0.125" bleed. If it doesn't quite reach, then enlarge the image slightly so that it does. When you save the PDF, in the export settings, add trim ...


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This is a good solution if you have Actobat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBhbSz4Uhpw


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