41

It's closest to a view called a three-quarters view, a type of axonometric projection, in between a side view and top down one. It's "[a] method of portraying three dimensional space in a two-dimensional plane ... [very] popular during the 16-bit era for JRPGs." source. It's still used in games today because of the high performance and artistic draw. The ...


26

This is another method to do the job using Illustrator Create a circle and select it Go to Object > Pattern > Make Adjust the spacing between circles in the pattern options panel and press Done Draw a rectangle and fill it with the pattern that you have just made; you may need to scale the pattern a little by choosing effects > distort & ...


22

Use a grid system. Draw the circular shadow on a flat non-distorted grid. Draw the distorted grid, and use the flat grid as a guide, noting where the shadow intersects with the grid lines. For example:


21

To amplify Billy Kerr's excellent response, if you wanted to set your light source in your illustration other than directly overhead (I can see Billy took, as I do, your initial sketched dashed lines running vertically as your intended shadow edge) you would draw vanishing points from the light source past the edges of your sphere to show the shadow path, ...


18

It's not an easy task if you are seeking to be precise. Illustrator won't do this easily. You'd have to manually draw the overall shapes and adjust perspective, size, and value for each element. A mesh in Illustrator fails because it's very difficult to get hard edge conversion areas, in addition, meshes distort the underlying objects based on position of ...


16

It's not truly perspective. It's an artistic interpretation of a 3D element, but not adhering to any mathematical perspective grid. The closest to a true type perspective would be one point perspective. It could also be considered foreshortening outside of the perspective context.


15

hsawires' answer with envelope distort > make with mesh is the best answer, but there are some additional tricks you can use that make it easier to get the "the perspective effect in sharp folds" described (also, four very good answers clearly isn't enough :-D): Prepare your dots, any way you like... the great thing about Envelope Distort is, you can apply ...


13

Disclaimer: I don't own any of these images. I just found them using Google. Please don't sue me. I am poor. I would say, if you want to go for the classic Disney or realistic look, then use perspective for sure. And a bit more than what you should for a portrait. Take a look at these Mickey mouse heads and the placement of the eyes. They are definitely in ...


13

You can actually do this in Illustrator (as per request). The trick is to make sure that once you use mesh tool you drag the along handles back to 1/3 of the way along the edge otherwise it squeezes the image along*. In addition it can help to keep rotating the are back and forth, for easier selection. Image 1: doing the scruple. What i actually do is ...


12

I don't think this illustration follows any of the strict formal Cartesian perspective models. If you try to find a vanishing point using edges that would have been parallel in the "real world" you will notice that there is none. The front of the car seems to follow, loosely, a one point perspective model. The rest of the car, though, follows an isometric ...


12

As an alternative to @Scott's answer you could use Puppet Warp in Photoshop (Edit → Puppet Warp). If you try this, I would suggest a selecting Mode:Rigid and Density:Fewer Points in the options at the top in order to make the surface less pliable, like in your example. Just add pins and move them around until you achieve the desired displacement. You ...


11

Drawing shadows Doing accurate shadows is quite easy, albeit a bit tedious. All you need is to do is to systematically find intersections of lines. Not all that different from drawing (or constructing) the original orthographic or perspective images in the first place. Before we begin lets define two different shadow models: Directional lights, are light ...


11

This is an example of a classic one vanishing point bird's eye perspective, but with a spherical warp in the left-hand side barycentric to the wailing child in the column of walking people. This series of comics, manga and animé seems to frequently use very low eye station point (worm's eye view) or very high eye station point (bird's eye view) to add a ...


9

Perspective or envelope deformation of embedded bitmaps objects is not (yet) defined in the SVG specifications. Therefore we can not do this with Inkscape. To overcome this we have two options only. Deform the bitmap to appropriate geometry prior to embedding using an external bitmap graphics tool. Tracing the bitmap to vector to then be able to use ...


7

I would use a Mesh Envelope Distort. The easiest way to ensure that the text follows the same contours as the sticker is to recreate the sticker shape. In this case, it's very easy since the un-warped dotted-line "shadow" of the sticker will give us a good base line. Step 1: Re-create the Surrounding shape and Group it with Your Text Step 2: Create a Mesh ...


7

Its is not so easy using Illustrator, but definitely it is easier using one of the 3D environment packages using the "Camera Match" feature. It is harder in illustrator because: The cup is not a perfect cylinder. When extruding a cylinder in Illustrator you have to match it with the cylinder on the Lego guy manually. anyway here what you have to do. First ...


7

Create something like this: The black lines on the left are your axes. The cyan object on the left is a perfect rhombus that is parallel to your bottom axes. The red object on the right is a perfect square. The rectangles on the right are what I understand that you want to put into perspective with the black spot marking the intersection of the axes. Apply ...


7

You'd be better off using a transform effect (Effect → Distort & Transform → Transform...) on a single line. Just set a number of copies, some vertical movement and use vertical scale to create the change in spacing:


6

Layers Magazine had a good article on this a long time ago when I wondered the same question. Step 1 Begin with the Product Art For this tutorial, we created the artwork for the box in Photoshop that we’ll apply to a 3D object in Illustrator. The art consists of three separate flattened PSD files that we’ll place in Illustrator. The file for the front of ...


6

It's an animation combining two separate images that you'd typically see with a Stereoscopic drawing In this particular example, it's likely one source image that was modified to create the second image by shifting things around a bit. Things that you want to appear further out in space would shift further than those that you don't.


6

I'm thinking Google SketchUp might be perfect for that. [PRO] Export PDF and EPS: 2D vector images With the Pro version of Google SketchUp, you can export views of your models in PDF and EPS format, allowing you to continue to work on them in vector editing programs like Illustrator and Freehand. For 2D images that need to be resolution-...


6

I'm unclear if [a] includes the entire side or just the top path of that side. Reflect [a] on a vertical axis, from the left side, this provides [b]. Rotate [a] (or [b]) to a 90° vertical, this provides [c] Then simply duplicate, move, and align these segments to form the cube. Let's assume that [a] includes that entire side and not a single path. The ...


6

Add an Envelope Mesh. Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Mesh and choose 1 row and 1 column and click OK. Then you can distort the envelope (which contains the raster image). Alternatively, for simpler and symmetric perspective distorts you can use Make with Warp and select any warp. If you then adjust Bend to 0 %, you can use the Horizontal and ...


6

I am not an Affinity Photo user. However, I should imagine like most image editors it has a distort transform tool. What I would do is begin with a curved railway track in 2 dimensions, then distort it for perspective, and rotate as required. This example was first made in Inkscape. Where I made a pattern for one railway segment then repeated it as a ...


6

Curvilinear perspective [1], but many people would also call it fisheye perspective. A very good example of how to draw can be found on research gate, describing it here would make for a monster answer that would take a very long time to write*. Albert Flocon and André Barre, La Perspective curviligne, Flammarion, Éditeur, Paris, 1968 * Well I have been ...


5

You are doing wrong, That's why its not going the way you want to. you have to group/link both to get the desired effect What you have to do is : You have to write your code in your layer which you want to skew. After that link both text(you can rasterize text layer its not necessary when using skew) and background layer (select both layer and press link ...


5

An easy way is to redraw your arrow and use Illustrators 3D-Tools to do the perspective parts. You start by redrawing your arrow in 2D like this: Next up, apply your brick pattern to your arrow. Then you use Effect > 3D > Rotate Check the preview box and adjust the settings to your liking. (To bring in the perspective you need to adjust the perspective-...


5

To draw a sphere inside a cube, you first need to find its center. This is indeed quite simple: just draw a straight line from each corner of the cube to the opposite corner. The point where the lines intersect is the midpoint of the cube, and thus also the center of the sphere drawn inside the cube: (If these lines don't all intersect at the same point, ...


5

Distortion happens. :) Escher made a career out of playing with the natural distortion which happens in perspective. Based on question title -- No. Based on question in your post --- Yes (they are opposite questions :) ) For a natural appearance in 2 point perspective all items must fall between the 2 vanishing points. Any object which falls outside either ...


5

Your road is 100 meters long and you want to find 50 metres, so we are basically looking for a way to divide the road in half. That's quite easy. Just draw in the diagonals of a rectangle and they should intersect in the center, in perspective as well as in plan: There is also a neat trick to divide the depth of a rectangle by projecting the divided width ...


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