14

It is called Vignetting, which, as you described: […] is a reduction of an image's brightness or saturation at the periphery compared to the image center. It can appear as Mechanical (filters used in a shoot, improper lens hood, etc) Optical (lens) Natural (illumination falloff) Pixel (digital sensor's alignment to the scene) Photographic film (the film'...


10

It depends a lot on where you print, what printer will be used for the task and what you need to do with the files. You might want to stay away from anything JPG because of the compression, that's a start. It can work for huge formats but they are used more as a last option; for example, if you cannot upload a banner of 300mb for printing, you might be "...


10

You can not just use pictures from online sources without first looking up the license of each and every picture. No amount of citing the source will make it permissible to use images. Only the licensing condition applies, this is not a fair use condition by any stretch. Manuals don't fall under any of the common exceptions, although legal issues vary based ...


9

Scott is exactly right. This is a photograph and there was no editing done to it to make it look the way it looks -- this is straight out of the camera. When a camera takes a picture it opens its shutter. During the time the shutter is open it absorbs light. The longer you leave the shutter open, the more light comes in. In this particular photo the ...


9

Sorry, but you won't be able to easily replicate the look of that image in Photoshop. It's actually a lighting technique, not a Photoshop technique. This is called backlighting the subject, or sometimes "contre-jour" lighting. In the first photo, the subject has two light sources, left and right, positioned slightly behind the subject. His face is not ...


8

Here are the steps I took: Duplicate the base layer and select the copy. Apply an edge detect filter (Filters -> Edge-Detect -> Edge...) using these settings: My goal here is to get clear contrast between my object and my background. I found Sobel worked the best and simply fiddled until I got this result. Threshold the colors (Colors -> Threshold...) ...


8

It's fairly easy to recreate the bevel effect. The inner swirl is a bit more difficult. I created the swirl with several variations of Filter > Render > Clouds set to Multiply and then merged with a solid color. Then used Filter > Oil Paint... to add some additional swirl variations. And finally Filter > Distort > Twirl and Filter > Blur &...


8

This is a photograph. By leaving a camera shutter open, sitting on a tripod, it's a common effect to use light to create interesting shapes with the long exposure time. A person moved around with a light and the camera picked up the light. There is nothing in that image that is not part of the original photograph. it's a known photography effect ------> ...


7

The colour treatment? You can do most of that with a Gradient Map. In the example below, I'm using a Gradient Map that's set to 80% opacity. With a Gradient Map Without a Gradient Map (Image nabbed from here.)


6

If you don't want something stolen, don't put it online. It's that simple. If you feel you must put it online.... come to terms with the fact it will be stolen. You can't prevent it. If I do put something online, I purposely hide secret codes and items in the artwork - things only I know are there - items which I can point out to clearly indicate how I ...


6

You can use a Photoshop Batch to re-size the images. This is how you do it: Step 1: Create an action for the re-sizing Actions are a great way of saving time when you need to do repetitive tasks in Photoshop. You can record a process, and then 'play' it to repeat it, and you can add as many steps in that process as you like. In your case, the first ...


6

After years of working with clients and bosses I have learned to always ask, "Why?". For instance in your situation I would be asking, "What's the problem you are trying to solve with using a photograph?". This does two things: It reframes the question from design specifics to a language you both speak well It reframes allows your boss to elaborate on his ...


6

You will be best served over the life of your career by knowing both Photoshop and Illustrator. For immediate needs, generally Photoshop knowledge can be slightly more useful out of the gate. But you won't go wrong by learning either. And be aware, merely because an employment position is listed as "Photography" or "Illustration" that does not mean the ...


5

Another avenue would be to contact one of the companies whose products the salon uses. sometimes they have a whole section of marketing materials and the only thing they ask is that you let their logo intact if you use their images.


5

You own the photos, but if you are using photo of trademarked items in commercial projects then yes, you need releases. Photographers can't use photographs of private buildings or structures in commercial work unless they get releases. They can't use automobiles without releases. I can't see how guitars would be any different. You need a release from ...


5

You need to uncheck the "Resample" checkbox before you change the ppi number. That leaves the image unchanged. To be sure, ppi and number-of-pixels are related, but they are not the same. (PPI is the correct term for an image. DPI has to do with dots on a piece of paper, and may not have any relationship with the PPI of the image being printed.) An image ...


5

In my opinion, anything which the clients sees in relation to the photography and its business should be branded. Stationery (card, letterhead, envelope) Web Site Photographic prints Invoices Quotes Receipts Model Releases Call sheets Buildings (signage if there is a building) Equipment (could just be stickers) The more places you can get your brand in the ...


5

A celebrity is a brand. That brand is marketed to generate revenue, by using that brand to endorse products or services. By providing royalty-free, commercial use, photography you are asking that a celebrity grant the right to use their likeness to promote anything anyone wants. They don't do that for very good reasons. Suppose the celebrity has publicly ...


5

First question. Print where? 1) If you are printing from home use the same application you are working in. 2) To print photos. The first option is to print from the original jpg extracted from your camera. If you are shooting in raw, do the processing you need and generate your jpg, the less compression you put, the less the artifacts will show. That also ...


5

Make your picture a square file > Convert it into a layer > Increase the canvas size (on the picture the gray area) Activate the picture layer > Go to Menu Filter > Lens Correction


4

It would appear you are looking for the image processor within Photoshop. To find it go to File > Scripts > Image Processor Select the desired folder Input the destination. If you dont do this step I believe it just saves it over the files. Its been awhile since I have used it. add your settings Here is a video on it that uses CS6.


4

As Scott mentions indirectly, this is what is usually called an HDR photo. The idea is you take a series of photos by bracketing: you take a single good photo and then 2 or more by altering the exposure (time or aperture) in both "directions" (lighter and darker). HDR requires a minimum of three I think. The overexposed ones give you more detail in the ...


4

The viewing distance of an image is somehow proportional to the size of the print. For example you normally do not see a magazine from across the street, and you do not see a billboard very close. That means that you can use the same photo on a magazine and on a billboard. If you have a 10Mpx photo, guess what? You use your 10Mpx photo. (These imagee ...


4

OK, You have a 20Mpx image. Lets do some math. 18" at 300 ppi 54" at 100 ppi 108" at 50 ppi 50 ppi is TOTALLY FINE for a photo that big. That is a pixel arround of half a milimeter. If you are really paranoid Xo) you could double the resolution with a bicubic Sharper option on Photoshop. I mean 200% (Not 123.456% or anithing else) Perhaphs you can aply ...


4

According to this answer on Quora, all you need to do is change the EXIF data of the image. You'll need to download ExifToolGUI v5.16 and Download ExifTool to do the job (Windows only). Using those tools Facebook will recognize your image as an interactive panorama.


4

Some reasons why an illustration can be the choice: Illustrations can filter out unessentials. A photo can have something that is unintentionally interesting and causes distraction. If you have a model that does or is something, at least somebody recalls "The same model was..." You cannot have photos of immaterial quantities. How you can take a photo of ...


4

Although there is no substitute for a real watercolour illustration, it is possible to get a similar look, or as you say, à la Ludwig Hohlwein. Clearly the choice of photograph will play it's part. Something with defined shadows and highlights, costume from that era, a background which can be easily removed, etc. Here I used a combination of an image with ...


4

A quick sketch can give the photographer a 'better than guesswork' chance of supplying the images you need. So, you need a girl on a bridge by a river, with some tall buildings in the background. You need it, for your main image, to be 4:3 portrait, but you also need to be able to re-crop for a banner... 'scuse the 'fine art' [I'm a photographer not an ...


4

University of Design and Art / Poster by C2F It looks like bags of a gel-like liquid that has been melted in places and/or had glue from a glue gun applied. However, this could also be a 3D image effect. Probably the best way to find out is to ask the creator C2F C2F is a swiss communication design studio founded 2006 by Cybu Richli and Fabienne Burri....


3

As it is easy to produce a soft-focus effect as seen around bright parts in the example photo it is very hard to get rid of it if it was an artifact. In this case they probably come from light scattering within the camera lens, or from dust on the optics. We can see this as a soft glow around bright lit areas, most prominent on the "enchanted" blue lab coat ...


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