46

Yes, simply use "Nearest neighbour" as the resample algorithm in the "image size" dialog (image -> image size) Edit: @CAI gives a nice tip - "It's also worth mentioning, if you don't want any distortion at all, multiply the scale by whole multipliers (so 2x, 3x, 4x or 200%, 300%, 400% etc.)"


28

Here is a somewhat easy method to convert full size images to pixel graphics. Starting image To begin, go to Image -> Image Size. Change the Resample method to Nearest Neighbor, this will keep the hard edges. You can zoom into the preview on the left to get a good idea of what your end result will look like. You can see I'm at 500% in this example. Next ...


27

When you are working with so few pixels you have to make every pixel count. I doubt an automated scaler will achieve that with satisfactory quality. My advice would be to downscale to the size required as normal (or possibly using a nearest-neighbour option), then zoom in, turn on the grid and go over your image pixel by pixel cleaning it up. To enhance the ...


26

(I am answering to the body of your question, please split this question into 2 things) Screens are way better, lets look at things: You can choose colors as you wish (even if you restrict palette). Your colors aren't smudged across 3 pixels* (Like Amiga) and your palette can actually make sense. Old games were designed with shoestring memory budgets** ...


21

I suspect that you are seeing realism by chaos. If you take a good look at, for instance, the radishes in the lower right, you will notice that they differ. In this case, by mirror imaging, and position variation. The two rows of beans sprouts on the left also have two distinct images to start with (but didn't mirror image one of them). One needed trick ...


18

Inkscape This powerful vector graphics application is free, cross-platform, and Open Source. It comes with an inbuilt function to trace vector graphics from bitmaps. These are the steps involved: File - Import...: choose to "embed" the bitmap. Select the embedded bitmap. Choose Path -Trace Bitmap.... This will open the following dialog: Make the ...


12

Not exactly, but... ... there is a way to achieve the effect you describe. Apparently you can change the scaling mode for smart objects, but it's a global setting that takes effect for newly created Smart Objects: Preferences > General > Image Interpolation. So the procedure is like this: Open your background image Set Preferences > General > Image ...


11

No this is not possible. To be entirely sure I went through every option that the layer has. A workaround might be setting up guides with the size you want the pixels to be and then using the Pencil tool to fill them.


11

No. I'd approach it one of these two ways: Use a multiplier for your pixel brush size, and just use nearest neighbour interpolation to resize your image to the correct size without deforming it. (let's say you had to blow up your pixel art 10x, just use a 10px square brush). You can always have a second view zoommed out to simulate the final size. ...


10

pixel2svg has the potential to do this, but it requires some modification of the script. How to do it You need to modify the svgdoc.add call on line 125 of pixel2svg.py to add in opacity attribute. It should look like the following: svgdoc.add(svgdoc.rect(insert = ("{0}px".format(colcount * arguments.squaresize), "{0}px"....


9

Shading isometric pixel art There is no rule for shading isometric pixel art. It's an aesthetic design decision which depends on the vibe you want your artwork to have. Even though pixel art is often highly stylized and mostly doesn't involve realistic lighting, adding shading is an emulation of a light source. It can be helpful to be aware of some of the ...


8

You can set up a a Grid in the Preferences to have a grid line every .5pt (same as px in AI). Then turn on Snap to Grid in the View Menu. This will allow you to snap to .5px increments. However, it is not going to matter. While you can place an object at a 1/2 pixel (or 1/2pt in Illustrator), upon output everything is adjusted (anti-aliased) to full pixels. ...


8

It depends on what results you want. If you want it to look "blocky" (i.e. each pixel in the original becomes a square in the result) then MrMerrick's answer is correct. If you don't want it to look either blurry or blocky then you need a dedicated pixel art scaling algorithm. I'm not sure if such algorithsm are available for photoshop, I did find a plugin ...


8

Another possibility, here; try drawing your images using vector shapes. There is a little time investment, but the potential afterwards could pay dividends. Start by setting your grid size (say grid line every 10 pixels, with only 1 subdivision). Turn on grid snap. Using the pen tool draw your shape. For any parts of the shape that are separated (i.e. on a ...


8

There's no way to know for sure what each individual artist does to make (short of asking them directly) but making something similar is fairly easy. Since you have no reference photo I'll try to replicate Minecraft's grass block texture, but you can scale this up to any size. Create a new image that is 16px X 16px Use Filter > Noise > Add Noise... (I used ...


8

I find using gradients with a bunch of semi-random grey stops can replicate a chrome mirrored effect pretty well. It helps if there’s some lighter points towards the top, but also a nice reflection from the ground. For a bit of fun, you can also overlay another gradient with some colour in it. I’m using a gradient from solid purple at 0% opacity to 100% ...


8

You could do it with GIMP which is free, open source, and works on Mac, Windows, and Linux. Open an image in GIMP, using File > Open In the main menu click Windows > Dockable Dialogs > Histogram Choose the Select by Color tool Shift+C, and set the Threshold to 0, in the Tool Options, under the Toolbox Click on a colour to select it, and the ...


7

You can change the layer boundaries size using the Layer Boundary Size option under the Layer menu. Thank you @johnpharrell for the right term to search by. You can read more about it here.


7

Edit: This answers only to the original question: What makes pixel art look better than simply low resolution images? Later edits of the question have changed the subject. Pixel art objects are created to be presented exactly with zero error on low resolution screens. Convert another image to the same low resolution and so much details can be lost that ...


6

It is probably not satisfying, but the actual answer is: You can't create a layer group in indexed mode because this has not been implemented in GIMP.


6

Browser rendering You can use the CSS property image-rendering to stop browsers from applying anti-aliasing and interpolating your image when resized. Browser support is a bit inconsistent though. Some browsers support the pixelated value while others need the crisp-edges value. Internet Explorer instead uses the non-standard -ms-interpolation-mode: nearest-...


5

What you are looking for is MagicaVoxel It's an 8-bit voxel modeling and animating program that's free and open-source. The software is still in its infancy but there are a small amount of tutorials showing how to create scenes and animate them. Other options: There's also a large list of other free programs here. Notable other options are Aseprite ...


5

Lots of pixel art doesn't 'calculate' any shading or other lighting colours, for they use a fixed palette. Just find the most appropriate colour (or the least unappropriate, in some cases) in the palette you're using and go with that. This palette limitation is to emphasise pixel art's simplicity and it harkens back to the old computer systems the medium ...


5

I'm doing pixel art as a hobby, and I've been very happy with Aseprite. Photoshop is the all-round image editor, but for pixel art I prefer to use Aseprite for the following reasons (among others): The interface The interface is pixel art in itself. At first it feels a bit chunky compared to Photoshop, but it's easy to get used to and after a while it just ...


5

Technology's one aspect, but I'd like to focus on what I think is an even bigger one: experience. The original games you're comparing this to? What experience did its designers have in creating computer graphics gaming - at all? Pretty much everything they were doing was groundbreaking - they didn't have any existing knowledge set to go off on it. But as ...


5

No Illustrator objects are either locked entirely, or not locked entirely. It is not possible to lock only specific aspects of any object within Adobe Illustrator.


5

Use the Eyedropper Tool instead. Make sure everything is unselected (ctrl-shift-A), set the fill/stroke color to what you want, then apply the color to any shapes with the Eyedropper (I to set tool, alt-click to use). This will allow you to quickly click on objects to change the color without the chance of changing position. Just remember that alt key or you'...


5

There's an easier way Create a new image with as many pixels as you need. Choose a new foreground colour, i.e. a green colour for the grass, and fill the canvas with it using Edit > Fill with FG colour Do Filters > Noise > HSV Noise, and move the Value slider until you get the effect you want.


4

Double-headed arrow. 16px version: 100px version for clarity: Different style, 16px: 100px:


4

Why do them put a picture in the center? Because of usability It enables you to see directly for which purpose this QR Code is intended. A QR Code can contian any kind of data,not URL's only! Because of trustability Usually QR Code readers haven't any machanism of pre-check the scanned information. That means scanning an URL directs you insteantly to that ...


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