Hot answers tagged

46

Yes, simply use "Nearest neighbour" as the resample algorithm in the "image size" dialog (image -> image size) Edit: @CAI gives a nice tip - "It's also worth mentioning, if you don't want any distortion at all, multiply the scale by whole multipliers (so 2x, 3x, 4x or 200%, 300%, 400% etc.)"


28

Just think of pixel like an atom. The atom is a smallest particle of matter. Where as a pixel is a smallest particle of digital image. An atom has neutron, proton & electron whereas a pixel has red, green & blue values :) The number of pixels per inches or centimeter (cm) etc. is called the "resolution". A higher resolution means more pixels per ...


21

A pixel is a pixel is a pixel. Resolution (as in PPI/DPI) is meaningless* in a digital context, the only time it is meaningful is when you are printing (or otherwise transferring to a physical medium) your image. A 100 × 100 pixel image saved at 72PPI will show on your screen exactly the same as the same as a 100 × 100 pixel image saved ...


19

You'll want to use the Pencil tool instead of Brush tool. It allows you to do pixel level edits without any anti-aliasing (the fuzzy area). It's located below the Brush tool or can be accessed by repeatedly pressingShift+B until it cycles around.


17

On a normal monitor imaging element is in a square matrix. We then call the aspect ratio of that pixel 1. Aspect ratio is just the width/height. A aspect ratio of 1 is a square and a aspect of 16/9 is elongated. In the case of monitors we have 2 separate aspect ratios the ratio of the monitor and the shape of each pixel, called pixel aspect ratio. These two ...


16

Sadly, menu Extensions -> Render -> Grids > Grid... does only take pixels as the measurement. So I am pretty sure conversion is the way to do it. I find the easiest, most accurate way to do conversion calculations for Inkscape is to do it in Inkscape. Use the rectangle tool to draw a rectangle on the canvas, then in the tools control bar for the rectangle ...


16

After a few minutes more of poking around in Gimp I finally noticed that the selection tool had an anti-aliasing option, that was turned on. If this is not selected you get hard edged fills.


16

In simple, rudimentary, terms... A dot is the smallest possible spot of ink on paper. A pixel is the smallest possible spot of light on a screen. Dots are never on a screen and pixels are never on paper. This does not cover how pixels are made. Nor does it cover how ink is made. If you care about construction of either, then a rudimentary explanation is ...


14

I prefer to use Inkscape's built-in document grid option. Press Shift+Ctrl+D or navigate to File→Document Properties→Grids Select Rectangular Grid and hit the New button. You can then edit the properties (and units) of the created grid in the same dialog.


14

As of GIMP 2.8, the way to paint with a 1 pixel brush using the pencil tool is setting the brush size to "1" in the Pencil tool options, when painting, regardless of Brush's shape or native size. In previous GIMP versions, the "pixel" Brush which was an image one pixel in size was available in the UI. It is currently hidden, and available only for scripts ...


14

(It's clear now that a simple answer to this question doesn't exist. Our language simply isn't precise enough. I like the two other answers, but would still like to give an answer seen more from the viewpoint of a graphic designer.) A pixel is simply the smallest unit of an image. An image file is a collection of pixels. Nothing more than colored squares in ...


13

If a client of mine asked for a 1920x1080px image, the first thing I need to know the intended use. Is it for the web, print, or both? In the print world, a pixel (or picture element - [pict-el]) has no meaning or definition. Pixels can not be measured in any way. They have no predefined size or unit in order to calculate their size. Therefore are not a "...


12

Not exactly, but... ... there is a way to achieve the effect you describe. Apparently you can change the scaling mode for smart objects, but it's a global setting that takes effect for newly created Smart Objects: Preferences > General > Image Interpolation. So the procedure is like this: Open your background image Set Preferences > General > Image ...


11

As people have commented, coding would yield the best solution. You can get a good approximation using Image > Adjustments > Gradient Map... Fill a canvas with 400% noise: Filter using Pixelate > Mosaic... Increase the saturation: And re-tone the image with Gradient Map: Result:


11

No this is not possible. To be entirely sure I went through every option that the layer has. A workaround might be setting up guides with the size you want the pixels to be and then using the Pencil tool to fill them.


11

No. I'd approach it one of these two ways: Use a multiplier for your pixel brush size, and just use nearest neighbour interpolation to resize your image to the correct size without deforming it. (let's say you had to blow up your pixel art 10x, just use a 10px square brush). You can always have a second view zoommed out to simulate the final size. ...


11

Compression efficiency A naive bitmap encoding stores all the pixel values directly. However, since there almost always is some redundancy in the image data, compression can be applied to reduce the file size. For example, intuitively, "640x400 white pixels" is a sufficient description to exactly encode all the pixel values that takes only 20 bytes ...


8

It depends on what results you want. If you want it to look "blocky" (i.e. each pixel in the original becomes a square in the result) then MrMerrick's answer is correct. If you don't want it to look either blurry or blocky then you need a dedicated pixel art scaling algorithm. I'm not sure if such algorithsm are available for photoshop, I did find a plugin ...


8

Another possibility, here; try drawing your images using vector shapes. There is a little time investment, but the potential afterwards could pay dividends. Start by setting your grid size (say grid line every 10 pixels, with only 1 subdivision). Turn on grid snap. Using the pen tool draw your shape. For any parts of the shape that are separated (i.e. on a ...


8

You could do it with GIMP which is free, open source, and works on Mac, Windows, and Linux. Open an image in GIMP, using File > Open In the main menu click Windows > Dockable Dialogs > Histogram Choose the Select by Color tool Shift+C, and set the Threshold to 0, in the Tool Options, under the Toolbox Click on a colour to select it, and the ...


7

Ok turns out that the 'Hardness' setting of 1 was the problem... I thought that hardness would affect antialiasing of the edge of the brush, and that a one pixel brush would need to have a hard edge or it would be invisible. It seems that the edge is not within the brush width, but around it, so that a one pixel brush with an edge is three pixels wide ...


7

I don't know if the answer is to specific, but since their is no general solution to this problem, I cloned Inkscape and patched the grid functionality. I'll try to improve my patch, so it will be maybe in a release version one day (so please don't down-vote instantly). Until then, one has to clone my repository and build it. My solution is as follows: ...


7

Your layer has no transparency or mask. That's why Ctrl+clicking the layer thumbnail isn't working. I don't have a copy of CC 2015 to go through the background removal tools that were available back then. It's outdated. If you already have Photoshop CC, it's free to update to the latest version. It has some additional tools that make selecting the subject ...


6

"Pixel Hinting" is a bit of a contrived term by the author of that article. Nothing wrong with it, but the term is typically reserved for type design. Traditionally, font hinting was the process of manually creating raster images of each vector glyph for each particular screen size deemed necessary. So, for example, at 9px on screen, the default vectors may ...


6

There is a computer science paper (really, fun memo) titled, "A pixel is not a little square" by Alvoy Ray Smith. A pixel is a point sample. It exists only at a point. For a color picture, a pixel might actually contain three samples, one for each primary color contributing to the picture at the sampling point. We can still think of this as a point ...


6

As you put it, vectorizing every pixel makes no sense. Imagine you vectorize every pixel and then resize it. You simply have bigger squares. The exact same thing happens if you change the ppi on an output, you have bigger pixels. You do not need to resample it. You want to get rid of the blurriness. That is a totally different issue. That happens when the ...


6

The View → Pixel Aspect Ratio setting in Photoshop simulates non-square (elongated, rectangular) pixels on a square-pixel screen, primarily for preview purposes. Photoshop does this simply by scaling the work area along one of the axes to get the desired, simulated pixel shape. The scaling takes place for display purposes only; when you change the pixel ...


6

It's only for print/manufacturing conversions. The operating system does not, most of the time, know what kind of screen is attached to the computer. So it does not even try to guess. Because it can not know it can not scale to physical size. But even in cases where it does, it does not even try because that would be even worse. DPI/PPI/LPI and physical ...


6

This is more like a long comment than a answer. The reason why you fail to get this is simply you have no need for this information. The only way you can ever understand this is if you care about the actual technical implementation details of the underlying system. In this case a printer and a screen. Since you most likely live in a all digital world you ...


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