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2

In the beginning, there was no difference between a dot and a pixel - the two terms were interchangeable. That's why you still encounter the term DPI in contexts where they're clearly referring to PPI. Even on a CRT where it was clear that a single pixel lit up a varying amount of phosphor dots, nobody bothered to draw the distinction. As technology ...


1

Some units are very precisely defined. Others much less. And you'll learn that some can have very different definitions depending on context or whoever you're talking to. Supposedly, a pixel (picture element) is the smallest addressable unit on a screen. So your screen may have 1920 x 1080 pixels ("full HD"), with each pixel being able to have a ...


3

"Dot pitch," when used as a term of art¹ related to CRT monitors, is the pitch of (i.e., distance between) the holes in the shadow mask. It has no relation to the pixels as displayed by the computer's graphics system (or the resolution of any other video source). Think of it as a grid of dots overlaid on top of the pixels generated by the computer. ...


14

(It's clear now that a simple answer to this question doesn't exist. Our language simply isn't precise enough. I like the two other answers, but would still like to give an answer seen more from the viewpoint of a graphic designer.) A pixel is simply the smallest unit of an image. An image file is a collection of pixels. Nothing more than colored squares in ...


6

This is more like a long comment than a answer. The reason why you fail to get this is simply you have no need for this information. The only way you can ever understand this is if you care about the actual technical implementation details of the underlying system. In this case a printer and a screen. Since you most likely live in a all digital world you ...


16

In simple, rudimentary, terms... A dot is the smallest possible spot of ink on paper. A pixel is the smallest possible spot of light on a screen. Dots are never on a screen and pixels are never on paper. This does not cover how pixels are made. Nor does it cover how ink is made. If you care about construction of either, then a rudimentary explanation is ...


1

you have to disable Show Pixels on Zoom


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