50

If the 5x5 pixel font suggested by Cai and mayersdesign is still too large, you could try the 4x5 pixel font I made a few years ago for a challenge on another SE site. The original version included only the letters A to Z and the . and ! characters, but I just made an actual TTF version of the font (using an online tile-based font editor) that includes all ...


33

You're going to have trouble with most fonts at that small a size. Some will have better hinting than others and be OK, but you're unlikely to find anything that perfectly works... What you really need is a font designed specifically to work at that size. Bitmap fonts are fonts designed as actual raster images for a specific size; Photoshop has bitmap font ...


25

The font 5x5 which is happily free (for personal use), is made specifically for 5px font heights.


17

Silly me. I found a solution in my bash history. I needed to set -filter point. convert from.png -interpolate Nearest -filter point -resize 800% to.png The default filter appears to be Cubic for me. Interestingly, -interpolate Nearest doesn't seem to affect the output at all and may not be needed above. I'd love to know why and won't accept this as the ...


14

Berkelium 1541 is a TrueType conversion of the proportional pixel font used by the GEOS operating system on the Commodore 64 to label files and other icons on the desktop. The text Berkelium 1541 / ISDN E18 scaled up 4 times in that font:


11

As people have commented, coding would yield the best solution. You can get a good approximation using Image > Adjustments > Gradient Map... Fill a canvas with 400% noise: Filter using Pixelate > Mosaic... Increase the saturation: And re-tone the image with Gradient Map: Result:


9

When evaluating graphics software for pixel art this is the kind of tools I'm looking for: The most well known software that is also great for pixel art is Photoshop. If you don't have access to it and are looking for the next best alternative, look at GIMP. I've been happily using it on Macs since around 2010 and it has everything you need for pixel art. ...


7

PikoPixel is a free pixel-art editor.          Easy to use Unlimited undo Supports multiple layers Customizable canvas background Hotkey-activated popup panels Export upscaled images Runs on OS X 10.4 Tiger & later


7

Short answer: That is impossible. Only media that do not use pixels to be displayed can be unpixelated. Photoshop is, in the end, a raster image program. That means that any file* you make in or export from Photoshop is defined as having pixels. No matter how small those pixels are, you will always see pixels and, thus, pixelation. If you want truly ...


7

Open a photograph in Photoshop Do Image > Adjusments > Desaturate Then Image > Mode > Indexed color, and use the settings shown below. Note: Afterwards, you can switch back to other modes such as RGB for further editing, by using Image > Mode > RGB


6

It's not dot-matrix printing simulation. It's stipple effect - a form of halftoning. It's well possible that some older software could use dot matrix printers this way to make greyshades with halftoning. As far as I know, generally the results of greyscale printing with dot matrix printers resembled much more the computer+hands image that user Danielillo has ...


5

That is not pixelation, that is blurred. Your icon is blurry. The problem is that you made them at different resolution and downscaled it, and the program made a resampling. To simulate the apropiate proportion of the stroke it applied some anti alias. You need to make them: a) pixel perfect at the exact resolution. b) make them in vectors, like svg. c) ...


5

A .png image type is not vector and is a bitmap image. When you save a ai file as an image, it rasterizes it (makes it bitmap). If you want a vector filetype, then you will need to go to File > Save as... and choose .svg, which is vector filetype.


5

It's not all noise. There's a heavy Moire pattern due the fact that you rasterized something already rasterized. One gets the same problem if he scans a printed photo. Digital signal prosessing mathematician would say that you have got a visible difference of the sampling frequencies both in the vertical direction and in the horizontal direction. You ...


4

You can't, at least practically speaking. An image only has so many pixels. To enlarge the photo, you either need to make the individual pixels bigger (it will be noticeably pixelated) or you need to make up extra pixels in between (it will typically be noticeably blurry). For slight enlarging, the latter is usually acceptable--especially with some careful ...


4

The viewing distance of an image is somehow proportional to the size of the print. For example you normally do not see a magazine from across the street, and you do not see a billboard very close. That means that you can use the same photo on a magazine and on a billboard. If you have a 10Mpx photo, guess what? You use your 10Mpx photo. (These imagee ...


4

GIF format does not support partial transparency, so it's not possible to create smooth, antialiased text on transparent background. If you know in what color will be the background used under the GIF, you can set this background for the GIF, write your text and then change background color to transparent. It will leave one or two pixels around the text for ...


4

Start with a Base image layer. Copy base image layer and choose Filter > Pixelate > Mosaic set it to some middle value and hit OK. Add a Layer Mask and draw a black to white gradient on the mask to hide a portion of the filter and show the base image below it. Copy the base image layer again and move it above all other layers. Choose Filter > ...


4

I know this post is a little bit late, but I just thought that this might help anyone out that just happens to be looking for a 5 by 3 pixel font. The Terminal font has really good 5 by 3 uppercase letters and numbers, however the lowercase letters are not all 5 by 3 pixels (shown with the red line in the image.)


3

Nope. As they say, "crap in, crap out". With a low resolution file, there just isn't any more information the application can use, so it's basically enlarging with very little pixel info, hence the pixelation. Now there is software like OnOne's "Perfect Resize" that uses Genuine Fractals to UpRes photos but even that can only do so much because it still has ...


3

You often need to set the Document Raster Effects Settings (DRES) in the Effects Menu to work correctly if you are using effects which are raster based, such as glows and shadows. Even if you are creating artwork for screen output it can help to increase the DRES setting. However, be aware, a higher DRES means slower screen redrawing for raster effects.


3

The issue is pretty much as you state in the question. A pixel-sharp image requires that your drawing aligns with the pixel grid. If your original was 30x30, any multiple of that will produce a pixel-sharp image as 1px will be converted to exactly 2px, or 3px, or 4, etc. 128, however, is 4.26 times as large as 30. So 1 px in your original is now 4 and one ...


3

Take a look at Sketch. It has made big strides toward being your next favorite UI tool. It's vector based but supports raster export. It supports a pixel preview mode similar to Illustrator but I think it does a better job with the vector to pixel output conversion overall.


3

There is many ways to accomplish that dept of field effect you are looking for, so I'll just link you to some of the tutorials I found: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/creating-shallow-depth-of-field-using-gimp-9722 http://tutorialgeek.blogspot.com.ar/2011/02/fake-depth-of-field-in-gimp-dof.html http://gimpguru.org/tutorials/simulateddof/ http://www....


3

Looks like your design is not aligning to the pixel grid properly. This creates all sorts of artifacts that are very difficult to control. I would suggest to set the dimensions of your canvas to 24px x 24px and zoom in enough that you can see the pixel grid. Then nudge and/or resize your icons until they align with the specific pixels. This will minimize ...


3

Rasterization turns your vector artwork in to a raster image. A raster image is made up of pixels. Ergo pixelation. There's no way around that. Either your Illustrator document is too small (Illustrator defaults to 1pt = 1px, i.e 72PPI) or you chose too low a resolution in the rasterize dialog. To get a higher resolution image (i.e less pixelation), simply ...


3

What a mess, to lift ourselves out of the rabbit hole we need to a bit of a lengthy explanation. Warning wall of text! TL:DR Pixelation is not defined so it descries many unrelated/related problems, so explanations vary. On pixelation People see different things for different terms for multiple overlapping things. When people use the term "pixelated" ...


3

That is not pixelation, thoose are "saw" edges. Basicly the transparency on a GIF file is rudimentary, so either you have transparency or not. (The first example is aliased, the second has saw edges.) Possible solutions are: 1) Make a gif non transparent with aliased edges. 2) Use another method to animate the text like CSS sprites on a transparent PNG. ...


3

Open Character panel and check Sharpness options:


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