38

No, not at all. It doesn't have nearly enough similarities to count as plagiarism. Yes, they both feature a tree. As do many, many logos. The style is different, the use of colors, the whole setup is different. However, if the other company is widely known in your field and you are afraid your clients might confuse you with each other, you could consider ...


14

I was previously familiar with the MDN logo, but no your logo did not come to mind when I saw yours. Is it plagiarism? Yes, if you used the MDN logo for inspiration then yes I'd say that's plagiarism. But not a very serious case of it. Is it highly unethical? It depends, but probably not. A rounded rectangle with a thick black stroke isn't exactly ...


12

There are not that many similarities. Both images are "flat design" and have a white background.(1) Both use a muted color. Both use sans serif fonts. The same is true, more or less, for Windows 10, Mac OS X Yosemite, and Google's UI guidelines. Let's see about the differences then. I think these are the most obvious: (where possibly "different font" ...


10

Personal opinion: I suppose you have not technically stolen it, but you should not use it. It is way too close. You have to tell your client what happened, and that it is in everyones interest to change it. ...and even if you used it, I would be very uncomfortable if my company had a logo that was so easily confused with another company.


9

Artwork is copyrighted when it is created. It doesn't matter if it is a concept or not, it is still copyrighted. If someone were inclined to try and prove you used the Bactolab logo as a basis, they wouldn't have a lot of difficulty. It definitely appears to be at best derivative work. Which can be an infringement on copyrights. However, I'm a designer, ...


9

Delhaize Group owns Food Lion, with corporate headquarters in Brussels Belgium. The red and black logo is typical of their European corporate and store identity. They own dozens of supermarket brands, several in the US. You've likely been to a Delhaize-owned market, and thus no plagiarism. Please visit their website, or read a wikipedia entry here: http://...


7

Looks like an infringement to me. Either conscious or not. They are far too similar with the rotation being the primary difference. However, just because your idea matched a previous idea it doesn't automatically mean there was any malice in the creation. To determine whether or not you can use it legally, you need an attorney specializing in copyright/...


6

There is not nearly enough similarity between both logos. Also by definition you are not plagiarizing, since you are not trying to use someone else's work as if it yours. I don't think there is anything unlawful here.


5

There is no legal threshold that you can go over to be "safe" as the law is interpreted by the judge. In this case I do not see any problems. The greens are different the style is different and even the trees are different. Not to mention the services are different.


4

I would not call this plagiarism. The type treatment and location are completely different. Also the the Penrose Triangle has been a part of popular culture for 80+ Years. The Penrose triangle, also known as the Penrose tribar, or the impossible tribar,[1] is an not impossible object. It was first first created by the Swedish artist Oscar Reutersvärd ...


4

There is a difference between "plagiarism" and "copyright infringement". Plagiarism means pretending that you created something when you didn't. If your graphics designer claims he created your logo, and in reality he paid some art student to create it, that would be plagiarism. Which would be legally totally fine. (Or you claiming that you created the logo ...


4

Further to what @user568458 said in the comment above about my answer on the other question: Try writing it in your contract with the designer. I AM NOT A LAWYER AND THIS IS NOT LEGAL WORDING. This is just a suggestion. You should run this by an actual lawyer, and I have no idea if this will hold up in court. But I think it's a decent start, and as a ...


4

Is it plagiarism? No. Plagiarism is taking another one's work and trying to pass it off as your own. If you really did conceptualize, sketch, and design it from scratch, then you did not plagiarize. However, those two logos are pretty similar, and I can't say you wouldn't get into hot water by releasing it. The fact that you didn't steal the design doesn't ...


4

You should look into asking a trademark lawyer, but for my personal opinion: There is a different usage in color. You are using a stroke to define the B. Yours is slanted. The gap is less in between the separation of the | and 3. The curve of the 3 doesnt match and yours appears to be higher up. You aren't using a pencil. I would suggest maybe: Adjusting ...


4

Try TinEye as well. Other than that there is a hard limit on how accurately an image can be reverse-searched. It sounds like you have a good method in place already but I would also search tutorial sites and the like. Usually people won't go very deep and use the first few things that pop-up on a search.


3

Did you use the MDN-logo as a template? Or does Google suggest the both as similar to each other? I think the probability that people will not perceive it as plagiarism depends on the extent of perceivable differences. So I tried some analysis (as far as it was possible, if the actual logo has to be an absolute mystery): your upper section is definitely ...


3

Extremely similar trademarks are often approved by the USPTO provided they are used in different kinds of business. What is LiveBulb? If it's not very possible for someone to reasonably confuse one party with another, it's probably fine. I would think the presence of the pencil distinguishes the two logos sufficiently. There are many extremely similar (and ...


3

I would tell them that they are plain and simple risking a potential lawsuit that could kill their business. If they dont value your original logo ideas, then maybe you should consider moving on. I wouldnt want any potential legal issues as a result of something I designed.


3

Don't worry. Did NOS invent the Hexagon? No. Did they invent the colours they use? No.


2

Its' not technically stealing because you did not know that there was another company with a similar logo. However it could easily be perceived as stealing due to the similarity so I would say that to avoid legal troubles, you should tell your client the research error you have made and come up with a new logo :)


2

In my opinion the logo is not really good, because it just seems quite generic, but if you are the only company on the specific market that uses a coloured hexagon it doesn't matter as much. Considering that Lucenticity sells colourful kitchens, the logo actually reminds you of it, but without research on the name you wont know what Lucencity sells. (I ...


2

Just to add, No it doesn't. Think of it this way You have some letters in your logo, doesn't mean you can file lawsuit against others too on a copyright charge. If your tree looked the same, had the same apples on it as the horticultural one then someone might have a case. However I'm not sure how far "he copied my tree" would stand up in court


2

The only answer is: Not If anyone has a different opinion, he/she has to explain it. Over and out. It is not your job. BTW: I like your logo :)


2

If the molecule can be found from elsewhere as public domain stuff and you are sure it's older than the work you show as source of your derivative, then feel free. Otherwise you take a risk to lose your reputation and be forced to pay Even if the molecule is free, never claim it's your original creation. Who pays to you must know the truth. He definitely ...


1

There are two creators whose copyright you have to consider here: The person who conceived the symbol itself. They are probably dead since hundreds of years and thus their copyright, trademarks, and whatever have long expired. The person who draw that diagram in your question. Their copyright is almost certainly not expired, but if you redraw whatever ...


1

It depends. If you are asking if you can use it as a logo for a company or product—no. They are essentially identical. If you are asking if you can put it on a t-shirt—you can do whatever you like. I see t-shirts with parodies of big brand's logos on a daily basis. But remember the company can still sue you. Wether they do and wether or not a court would ...


1

My first question is either a registered trademark? My second are the companies even remotely in the same business? Good example Obama has a campaign logo is well known and I assume is registered. A Texas Republican use a markedly similar logo in his campaign. Obviously both are in the same 'trade'. Once the second logo surfaced it took only 24 hours ...


1

What are the reasons for the shapes / colors / fonts you used in the logo? Can you defend the process of your design and how you came up with the elements? If your process validates the design, because it relates to the ethos of the business then it should be okay to use. If you choose the design because it looks pretty, then I would say move on to another ...


1

Does NOS and LUCENTICITY operate in the same fields or the same area? If fields of operations/communications of both companies overlap each other; if in any way one can prove the other is creating a threat to its business, then you might have legal issues. If business matter and operations zones are distinct, then the only thing that might be affected is ...


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