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0

Try exporting the PDF using the PDF/X-4:2010 standard. If possible, use a postscript driver to print. If these two elements are in place, you may not need to convert the PNGs to CMYK at all.


0

Ok, maybe I have got the solution. I have read a bit more about PDF/X and found that PDX-1a just allows CMYK. Thats what the printing company asked for...but looks like this is the issue as the PNG file is RGB. So I used PDF/X-3:2002 and that worked as it allows RGB too. Funny enough PDF/X-4 does not work...funny


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If you want to make super sure, open up your PNG's in Photoshop, save each one as PSD in CMYK, relink the PSD's into the INDD file and export using the Press Quality PDF export preset.


1

shows everything converted to RGB (as the PNG File is RGB). Looks like PNG will not get converted to CMYK, instead the whole file will be converted to RGB. Two parts here. A raster image inside PNG is no more PNG or JPG or whatever... It is a raster image inside a PDF. The real problem here is that you are not using the correct PDF export setting. A PDF ...


2

I'll try to make it more clear: PNG format supports a lot of different combinations of channels: if you want, you can read more in depths in the format description. Generally people care about two types: PNG8 (8bit per pixel, 256 colors) and PNG24 (24bit bit per pixel, Truecolor). Note that when you have a document in Photoshop that says 8bit, it's 8bit ...


0

The issue has not a thing to do with color spaces. It is about transparency...or alpha. Use BMP format. You cannot readily composite using chromakey or alpha blending with any other format on Windows based machines.


15

Broadly speaking there are two schools of thought on file-format design. One is that you should have lots of options to give lots of different users what they want. The problem with this approach is that compatibility becomes a problem. Just because a program advertises support for tiff files doesn't mean it can open your particular tiff file. The other is ...


35

Why? Because PNG is a lossless raster image format developed for the web, and ultimately for display screens which are RGB. However the format was never intended or designed to be a print format, and therefore doesn't need to support CMYK colour, and so it's entirely the wrong format to use for CMYK printing - i.e printing where separations are required ...


1

Look at it this way: PNG was developed as a replacement for GIF and so generally to be used in digital work, which means RGB (screens use RGB). And yes PNG is limited to RGB. While CMYK is a print-specific model available in JPG**, TIFF, PSD and some other formats. Read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Network_Graphics https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


5

Simply, the PNG format has no support for any other color mode than RGB. There is no way around this. Use TIFF


1

I don't see how anyone could come up with a solution to this. Even if you export in black and white, this may still be a huge file, as PNG is not a practical format at this file size. I'd look at ways to break up the artwork into numbered tiles. Every game, every brochure, every product catalogue, every magazine, etc in the world is made up of pieces which ...


0

I will answer this quikly before it gets closed. The answer is simply: Implementation details count. So even if the math is the same. Processing might not be the same. Math and images themselves do not have a straight forward enough interpretation. Think: How do you do the math in integer arithmetic How do you round numbers? Do you implement it all in ...


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Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign both handle vector art, so does Sketch app (though it's more of a UI design tool now), so do Affinity Designer and Affinity Publisher - all of which are available for Mac - I also use Inkscape (on occasion) on a Mac, and as long as you've an X11 instance, it works fine. For myself, I'd do this work in Affinity Designer ...


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Different algorithms produces different result and both software handle interpolation differently. Looking at your code gives a hint that you’re using catmull-rom algorithm for bicubic interpolation in image magic. It gives the smooth result but can’t be compared pixel to pixel with a different algorithm (matlab)


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