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22

Clients have the final say. Even if you disagree with it. Disregarding that there maybe technical reasons why uppercase is a bad idea. And disregarding the fact that upper case lowers readability and often has the opposite effect of "emphasis"... Client direction is always the deciding factor. If the client doesn't like it, don't do it. If you are ...


20

There are 3 areas... Trim Safety Bleed Trim is the final delivered size of the piece.If you order an A3 flyer, then the trim is the dimension of the A3 (29.7 x 42.0cm) Safety is the margin inside the trim. The area between the trim and where the actual content (text) starts. In most instances you'll want to leave at least 6 or 7mm between your content ...


19

Yes. If you work on anything for a client it's billable. It doesn't matter if it's an entirely new item or a reformatting of an old/existing item. They all take your time and it's your time you charge for. i.e. The poster may take you 8 hours to design... the social media content may take you an additional 2 hours to reformat the poster art to fit online ...


16

Consider folding your paper to create a brochure. image source (public domain) When your single sheet of paper is folded into a brochure, it is clear that there is more information inside it and on the back. People are used to brochures and know to look at all pages and sides. You get to highlight information based on its location: Front panel: very ...


15

No, you don't. I believe that once you see a flyer in your hand, in your mailbox, under the door, etc, the general reaction is to at least flip it over and see if there's anything else on the back. Also, the way you layout the elements on the front can induce the idea that the content extends on the back. For instance, if its a product being sold, the ...


14

I can't remember a single academic poster, from my 'scientific years', that was (at all) well designed. All I can think of are walls and walls full of text (usually in the same font), and me not reading even 10% of them. But to be honest, most teams wouldn't have the budget for (or the tradition of) hiring designers to do them. Posters usually need to ...


13

HAVING A EMAIL ADDRESS IN UPPER CAPS IS A REALLY BAD IDEA. USING THEM AS "EMPHASIS" IS SOMETHING FROM THE TYPEWRITER ERA WHERE YOU DID NOT HAVE OTHER OPTIONS. Sorry for that. As commented by others, while the user name in an email address is case-insensitive, the domain name is not. In some extreme cases, YouCouldUseCamelCase use of capitals. They are used ...


11

People will naturally try flipping it over if they feel that they are looking at an incomplete part of a larger whole. Ideally, you'd like to take advantage of that -- you want the user to flip the flyer as a natural stage in their discovery process, rather than because they've been explicitly told (i.e. by an icon in the corner) to flip it over. This is the ...


10

That actually looks to be about a 7° angle (although it's not exactly 7°. It's like 7.1° or 7.2°). There are no hard and fast rules on angles I'm aware of. But generally, I try to stick to 5° increments. The real key to using angles which are aesthetically pleasing is to use them repeatedly in the same piece. One element at an angle will almost always ...


10

My advice would be to let it be. The only thing the "copy" has in common with your work is the idea of a noose with a drop of water. The style is different and the context probably also. It's not hard to imagine that someone could come up with this concept without knowing about your artwork. Actually it seems that someone already created a poster with a ...


9

I think the only real con is your limited color space. And that isn't necessarily a huge con... Some great designers have embraced the photocopier. One that comes to mind is Art Chantry who, IMHO, is just as responsible for the Seattle Grunge scene as Nirvana was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Chantry Granted, that's a particular aesthetic that may ...


8

That question is hard to answer in general. I think it depends on your location and what you want do with it. I have found this link, which is about lyrics quoted in books, but I think you can transfer it to your question: Quoting Lyrics and Dodging Copyright Issues by Grant Piercy As suggestet, here are some quotes from the article: Let me make this ...


8

bigger, bolder == more noticeable, more legible. ALLCAPS == shouting & actually harder to read. I sometimes use title case on mine, TxxxxxMedia, which makes it slightly easier to read & my mail server doesn't mind it. Late edit According to the other, later, answers here, no server should mind any type of case differentiation in the domain ...


8

Part of your design should be based on how the brochure/flyer is presented. Will it be hanging on a wall? If so, it's not going to work well if double-sided. If the flyer is in a stack on a surface, one might get away with a less-than-perfectly aligned stack of paper, especially if a few of them are flipped to show the reverse side. Your idea of an arrow-...


6

The mail standard says that what is before the @ could be case-sensitive and is under control of the host system, and what is after @ is case insensitive as it is under the control of the mail delivery system. In practice the prefix is very rarely considered as case sensitive (I've never encountered any such system), so you can use any casing you want and ...


6

An A4 sized paper is 1/4 the size of an A0 poster. Work on a a4 paper, print it and view it. Calculate that it will look the same as an A0 poster viewed at 4 times the distance. If you can see it ok at 1 m, the poster will look the same at 4 m. Make decisions based on that. P.S. The font size you are using, for example, 28 pts, will be 7 pts... too small....


5

For printing a poster, should I go for 8 or 16-Bit mode? 16-bit color is usually overkill for most any project. Professional photographers will often use it for the flexibility it provides when editing RAW imagery, but beyond that, it's not usually something you'd need to deal with. For putting my poster on web, what should be the ppi because I think ...


5

Depends on the mail system. Many mail systems do not actually care, but they could be configured to care. Some systems also allow you to have extra stuff in mail addresses, ask your mail provider for documentation.


5

A big, bold and uppercase YES. The whole purpose of an hourly rate is for it to be applied to everything you produce for the client. You just count the time for every request sent you get, and yes that includes adaptations of existing artwork. Also.. The hourly rate should also be applied to writing email, phone calls, taking a taxi to join their meeting, ...


4

Obviously you're limited by the equipment you have at your disposal, but have you considered CMYK screen printing? You will need a 4 color press with precise registration, but it is entirely possible to do: CMYK Screen Printing Consumer level wide format inkjet printers are available if you're looking to buy one, in my experience Epson is generally regarded ...


4

I wouldn't use that feature. It's far too complicated. To create the layout, you could simply make one group of two text boxes. Setting up the correct size fonts and changing the leading are as complicated as it needs to get. Then you could simply Alt+drag then hold down Shift to duplicate the group, and edit the text in the duplicate. Then nudge it into ...


4

A reverse image search brings up the design archive this came from, as well as some details. It's CS Beta Bold https://www.experimentaljetset.nl/archive/comingsoon Judging from the details provided by the archive, you likely won't be able to obtain a license for this family.


3

iTunes has a similar feature that sums up genres nicely:


3

"Most attractive" is a pretty hard question to answer, but if you want to emulate a range of styles in a movie poster, you're in luck because movie posters tend to follow a range of clichés. FontShop has a blog called the FontFeed, and they have a large archive of posts where they review movie posters. Read ten of 'em in succession and you'll start to see ...


3

Whether or not this approach is appropriate is going to depend entirely on who your organization is. Assuming it's not a total branding miss ... I've done some very low budget black and white work (offset and digital) for commercial clients and cause-based events. You can achieve great impact if you design for the limited palette* and choose your paper well....


3

To me (a designer), a company (non-profit or otherwise) using b&w photocopies as their unique print communication comes across as on a shoestring or no budget, amateurist, college-back-room and underground, maybe even semi-legal. I can't really call this a pro or con -- If these are associations your company and your target audience and benefactors will ...


3

My advice is: visualize as much as possible. Posters live from being easy to digest. If people see clutters of headings, paragraphs and some images randomly thrown in they usually get lost and bored. I once was told that a person in a crowd is not willing to spend more than five minutes looking at the poster, the very first seconds decide if a closer looks ...


3

As others have noted, buying more RAM is rarely a bad idea when working with images, particularly very large ones. However, another way to approach the problem would be to design your poster in a vector graphics editor such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape. As vector graphics are scalable, they can be rendered at any size or resolution without suffering ...


3

150 ppi is plenty of resolution if you're printing on canvas. If you expect your piece to be viewed from a few inches away (less than 16), then 300 ppi is more than sufficient. Beyond that point you're just adding to the file size without adding visible image information in the final product. On high-grade art paper, you can go as high as 600 ppi. Beyond ...


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